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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

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Thoughts On BHT And Gluten Free Chex Cereals
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Well, after eating some Chex cereals a couple of weeks ago and getting what I called severely glutened I posted on here a thread "Man, have I been glutened."

well, in the discussions something was brought up if it might have been the possibility that it might have been BHT instead of the Gluten free cereal. HI Irishheart! :P:D

Well, I finally got to test the theory. I found a rice cereal at walmart that is made with nothing but rice. It's called Great Value Toasted Rice in the plain white and blue boxes.

These are the ingredients:

Rice, Sugar, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Molasses, Reduced Iron and Zinc

oxzide plus a bunch of Vitamins that I'm not gonna list. Too long. :D

Thankfully it does not have any gluten, malt, soy, or dairy. But it does have the BHT added. Oh, it also states that it may contain traces of Almonds and Wheat.

So, I have ate it for 2 days straight and I have had at least 2 bowls a day. So far so good. No gassiness, no cramps, nothing. No problems at all.

Whereas the Chex cereals hit me within a couple of hours every time with D, and just downhill from there.

So, I have to say it's because of the gluten in the gluten-free Chex that does it to me.

That's my story and i'm stickin to it.

I guess I can say I have finally found a cereal I can eat for breakfast in the mornings if I want, yahoooo! :D

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I get a gluten reaction to "gluten free" Chex cereal as well, for what it's worth. I think they just have a low level in it, I had to eat it more than once before I built up a reaction. However, when my gluten-induced vertigo suddenly came back... I knew it was gluten! Got better as soon as I stopped having the Chex. There seems to be a LOT of "gluten free" products that I can't tolerate the teesy weensy levels of gluten in. I guess that's why I'm posting on the Super Sensitive Celiacs board. :D

BTW, hello all, new here!

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Do you notice this reaction with all gluten-free Chex cereals or just the rice one? I feed my 1 year old the gluten-free Corn Chex cereal every morning.

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I am still new to this, but....

I've only had the gluten-free Chex cereals twice. It was the cinnamon one. I don't know about a reaction but I can say it is delicious.

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Do you notice this reaction with all gluten-free Chex cereals or just the rice one? I feed my 1 year old the gluten-free Corn Chex cereal every morning.

Hi Suziq, I get a reaction from all of them. I react to almost all the gluten free processed foods, that's why I post in the Super sensitive forum also.

Also, Welcome to the forum Deinanth!

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Does the walmart brand contain mixed tocopherols? I know that Rice Chex does. Those can be derivied from soy or from other sources. Perhaps you are reacting to the soy in Rice Chex? I'm super sensitive to gluten but I'm not super sensitive to soy. I can eat things with mixed tocopherols as long as I know the source is NOT gluten and I only eat them once in a while. But if I ate rice chex everyday the soy would build up and get me eventually. So could you be super sensitive to soy?

I'm not doubting your reaction at all but the reason I'm asking is that I thought the gluten-free Chex cereals were made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. Please let me know if I'm wrong about this because I don't like to take risks with things not made in gluten-free facilities. Thanks for sharing your experiences!

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Does the walmart brand contain mixed tocopherols? I know that Rice Chex does. Those can be derivied from soy or from other sources. Perhaps you are reacting to the soy in Rice Chex? I'm super sensitive to gluten but I'm not super sensitive to soy. I can eat things with mixed tocopherols as long as I know the source is NOT gluten and I only eat them once in a while. But if I ate rice chex everyday the soy would build up and get me eventually. So could you be super sensitive to soy?

I'm not doubting your reaction at all but the reason I'm asking is that I thought the gluten-free Chex cereals were made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. Please let me know if I'm wrong about this because I don't like to take risks with things not made in gluten-free facilities. Thanks for sharing your experiences!

Hi GFmanna, The Walmart brand does not have mixed tocopherols or soy. I react to all of the gluten free chex cereals not just the gluten free rice chex. All of the gluten-free chex does not have soy in them. But, to answer your question, yes, I have to avoid all soy products too.

And yes, the gluten-free cereals are made in a gluten free facility. That's what makes this so frustrating to me.

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I have noticed a big difference in degree of sensitivity even among those who call themselves super sensitive. It makes things so much more difficult and confusing. If you can eat Chex cereals maybe you are super sensitive, and maybe those of us who can't are super duper sensitive. Just be glad about what you can eat.

I never did find a cereal I could eat. I gave up trying. Maybe I could this one, but I've gone to fruit and yogurt in the morning anyways. I'm tired of trying things and having them make me sick.

I need to buy my gluten free grains whole and very carefully sourced and then sort and wash. I often find gluten grains mixed in. I can't imagine any gluten free cereal maker is going to go to all that trouble. It doesn't make a difference if the facility is dedicated or not if the grain is contaminated before it gets there.

I'm happy to see more super sensitives posting here.

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Does the walmart brand contain mixed tocopherols? I know that Rice Chex does. Those can be derivied from soy or from other sources. Perhaps you are reacting to the soy in Rice Chex? I'm super sensitive to gluten but I'm not super sensitive to soy. I can eat things with mixed tocopherols as long as I know the source is NOT gluten and I only eat them once in a while. But if I ate rice chex everyday the soy would build up and get me eventually. So could you be super sensitive to soy?

I'm not doubting your reaction at all but the reason I'm asking is that I thought the gluten-free Chex cereals were made in a dedicated gluten-free facility. Please let me know if I'm wrong about this because I don't like to take risks with things not made in gluten-free facilities. Thanks for sharing your experiences!

Wow...your post just made this big light bulb go off!!!! My son had severe vomitting after eating Gerber baby rice cereal...there are no gluten ingredients and when I contacted the company they said the rice cereal is processed on lines that could process gluten foods but they are cleaned well. So I figured it was just contaminated. But I remembered the cereal contained mixed tocopherals so I just called the company and it's made from soy! I've been wondering about soy issues lately too and this makes me wonder even more if there's a soy issue too. I never knew it could be made from soy so thanks for posting that!

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Hi GFmanna, The Walmart brand does not have mixed tocopherols or soy. I react to all of the gluten free chex cereals not just the gluten free rice chex. All of the gluten-free chex does not have soy in them. But, to answer your question, yes, I have to avoid all soy products too.

And yes, the gluten-free cereals are made in a gluten free facility. That's what makes this so frustrating to me.

Oh, I did not realized that not all the Chex had mixed tocopherols or vitamin E (things that can be sourced from soy). I have only tried the Rice chex and Corn chex and don't eat them very often (maybe once every two months I feel like some cold cereal). Sorry for your frustration. :(

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I need to buy my gluten free grains whole and very carefully sourced and then sort and wash. I often find gluten grains mixed in. I can't imagine any gluten free cereal maker is going to go to all that trouble. It doesn't make a difference if the facility is dedicated or not if the grain is contaminated before it gets there.

I'm happy to see more super sensitives posting here.

This is a good point. I would hope that gluten-free cereal makers would go to some trouble to make sure the grains were not contaminated in order to avoid lawsuits and such but since there are no industry standards or laws we really have no way of knowing what they do or don't do within the "gluten-free" factory. Even if they tell us the upmost care is taken we have to take them at their word. That's why 90% of my diet is not processed food. I may not react to the occaisional bowl of Chex cereal but it's not a good idea to have it everyday, IMO.

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Wow...your post just made this big light bulb go off!!!! My son had severe vomitting after eating Gerber baby rice cereal...there are no gluten ingredients and when I contacted the company they said the rice cereal is processed on lines that could process gluten foods but they are cleaned well. So I figured it was just contaminated. But I remembered the cereal contained mixed tocopherals so I just called the company and it's made from soy! I've been wondering about soy issues lately too and this makes me wonder even more if there's a soy issue too. I never knew it could be made from soy so thanks for posting that!

It really could be either one (another intolerance or cc). I try to avoid things processed on the same lines as gluten. Even if they clean it really well it just makes me uneasy. Soy is sneaky however too and can be hidden in things like mixed tocopherals, Vitamin E or soybean oil in the form of "vegetable broth" and does not have to be declared as containing soy on the label in the US under the allergen laws. I hope you can figure out which it is!

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Thanks for the welcomes, although I admit I've been lurking for quite some time :)

For me, I am very confident it was a gluten reaction when my vertigo appeared, as I only get vertigo when I get into gluten. No gluten = no vertigo. Whenever I try a new processed food, I try to give it a full month or until I hit a reaction and have to stop. On several occasions, it's taken several weeks to get a really definitive reaction. From my understanding, that's a very celiac kind of thing, as it can take time to do noticeable intestinal damage. It was like that with the Chex. I was on it for a little while, feeling a bit worse for wear and was just starting to notice that my head had been feeling funny, then one day I was standing at a table, turned to walk away, spun hard and fell over. LOL. Vertigo! When I stopped the Chex, it went right away.

My understanding with processed foods... and correct me if I'm wrong... but gluten free only means tested down to 20 parts per million or lower, doesn't it? So not really free of gluten in the strictest sense of the word. I think my tolerance is simply lower than that, and of course everyone's is different as has been said. I can't have King Arthur gluten free products either. I'm currently testing Jules gluten free flour mix and it seems like a winner, fingers crossed. But I also just bought a mill and some whole grains, and that seems the safest way to go for the future.

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I'm super sensitive too. I was reading through this thread and thought about the food fights we used to have as teens. We're in full tilt food war now. :ph34r:

I gave up on Chex about six months ago, and I've gradually given up on most grains and proceesed foods. I'll have rice about once a week. I rinse it well and inspect in, then cook it.

I love crispy fried Hormel Corned Beef Hash with a fried egg on the weekend, but I can't eat the yolk. Most days my breakfast is fruit salad or a piece of fruit or a smoothie.

I ordered some almond flour from nuts on line because the other flours weren't agreeing with me. I'm looking forward to experimenting with that.

Good luck with the food wars, everyone. :D

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My understanding with processed foods... and correct me if I'm wrong... but gluten free only means tested down to 20 parts per million or lower, doesn't it? So not really free of gluten in the strictest sense of the word. I think my tolerance is simply lower than that, and of course everyone's is different as has been said.

That's just how I see it. (And also my GI).

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I need to buy my gluten free grains whole and very carefully sourced and then sort and wash. I often find gluten grains mixed in. I can't imagine any gluten free cereal maker is going to go to all that trouble. It doesn't make a difference if the facility is dedicated or not if the grain is contaminated before it gets there.

+1 to this - do companies even bother to test their "naturally gluten free" products, especially if they're made in a gluten-free facility? Why bother if there's "no risk of contamination". Add to that the below 20ppm rule, and it's makes for some very confused sensitive celiacs :/ I can't eat any of the sorghum flour brands, tried everything I could get my hands on, every time a distinct gluten reaction. So I pretty much can't trust anything with sorghum flour either...

I can eat certain Nature's Path cereals (The eco-friendly, support endangered animals line of cereals), but only the very plain ones without soy added to them.

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I have severe neurological and immune reactions to wheat, but I'm not allergic, I have a rarer form of celiacs and MCS which did not pass the genetic test, which still does affect any tissue with inflammation. I also have a similar reaction to a variety of foods. Consider that celiacs may just be the first in a long line of immune sensitive food diseases, celiacs is just the worst I think. I know because I can differentiate 15 foods, oils, and spices as hazardous to my immune system on top of my 'celiacs.' I basically go blind temporarily now. I even sneeze upon entering a bakery because of my multiple chemical sensitivity and wheat sensitivities. Basically my crazy allergies and food sensitivies and chemical sensitivity have made me just super sensitive.

Good news is once I avoid all that stuff, I can feel just dandy for a time.

Currently wondering if I ate a bread crumb off the household butter. Blood pressure up, feel like puking.

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I have severe neurological and immune reactions to wheat, but I'm not allergic, I have a rarer form of celiacs and MCS which did not pass the genetic test, which still does affect any tissue with inflammation. I also have a similar reaction to a variety of foods. Consider that celiacs may just be the first in a long line of immune sensitive food diseases, celiacs is just the worst I think. I know because I can differentiate 15 foods, oils, and spices as hazardous to my immune system on top of my 'celiacs.' I basically go blind temporarily now. I even sneeze upon entering a bakery because of my multiple chemical sensitivity and wheat sensitivities. Basically my crazy allergies and food sensitivies and chemical sensitivity have made me just super sensitive.

Good news is once I avoid all that stuff, I can feel just dandy for a time.

Currently wondering if I ate a bread crumb off the household butter. Blood pressure up, feel like puking.

Hi. Sorry you are feeling so punk. You can get excellent info on MCS from TheCanaryReport.com Lots of good threads there.

I don't go in bakeries any more. Too much wheat dust in the air.

Our sensitivity to gluten is a different mechanism than the MCS, which is triggered by a nitric oxide irregularity. Dr. Martin Pall has studied this and a number of doctors are studying Dr. Pall's work.

I have quit eating any "community" food. Quit eating most gluten-free foods and anything prepared in a factory that processes gluten.

Hope you feel better soon.

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