• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Waffle Iron Blues
0

16 posts in this topic

So, I wanted to make gluten-free waffles from scratch. Looked around for a nice electric waffle maker without chemical coatings, aluminum, or any other unsafe material for the grids/plates, and have come up empty :(

Why oh why can't we have an electric waffle maker with cast iron, stainless steel, or other safe grids/plates? All I can find in cast iron is a thing which you basically heat on the stove top, pour the batter into, and flip over repeatedly to keep both sides hot until the batter is cooked. I don't mind a bit of work, but this sounds messy, time-consuming, and prone to hit-n-miss results. The iron is also a bit on the expensive side too.

Anyone use the cast iron thing with relative success?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:

Never tried it, but perhaps you could bake it in the oven instead?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never tried it, but perhaps you could bake it in the oven instead?

Interesting idea. I'm not sure, but it sounds like it may work, at least as well as on the stove. Although certainly more energy intensive, heating up the kitchen a lot more. Guess I'll do some searching on that to see if anyone has tried, and any pitfalls, pros and cons there might be.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen a cast iron stovetop version that has a bottom plate (like a simmer plate) that stays on the stove while you flip the waffle part. Not quite as messy as the camping versions...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen a cast iron stovetop version that has a bottom plate (like a simmer plate) that stays on the stove while you flip the waffle part. Not quite as messy as the camping versions...

If I understand your description correctly, I've seen electric ones like that, but not cast iron. Do you know what brand it was?

Here's one of those flip ones which I've seen:

main_view_1_331x285.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Lehman's has a round cast iron stove top version on sale that sounds like it needs a bit of tinkering with before it makes the waffle- the reviews are interesting, alternating between "can't figure it out" to "wonderful waffles."

http://www.lehmans.com/store/Kitchen___Cookware___Cast_Iron_Cookware___Round_Cast_Iron_Waffle_Iron___1100865?Args=

I tried searching pizzelle irons, which are sort of like a mini waffle iron that makes a big crispy cookie, and that might be an option if you don't want to mess with a full fledged size waffle iron at first.

However, searching pizzelle irons also brought up a LOT of long handled, small cast iron waffle irons for home/camping use that make only one or two waffles.... they aren't that expensive and might be a better thing to experiment with.

Check this out: Rome brand Chuck Wagon Waffle Iron

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___80335?cm_vc=PDPZ1

Is that cute, or what ? More adorable small cast iron handled things from Rome (Campmor catalog) see page two http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/SubCategory___40000000228_200368816

I wish I had seen this catalog earlier this year because we were looking all over for some of this stuff to do outdoor cooking with, and I could not find any of it locally - they also have a hot dog cornbread cast iron thing that looks like it would be perfect to make a few corndogs in, without deep frying.

According to google "product search" this is also available at places like Sear, BedBathBeyond, etc.

With cast iron, you don't flip it back and forth continuously, you heat it up with the oil on both plates, put the batter in, and then cook it on the bottom (goes faster than you'd think) and flip it once to finish.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Takala, that's the cast iron one I referred to, only I found it on Amazon. Reviews there are mixed as well. Guess I'll have to take the plunge and hope for the best.

Sure wish cast iron could be reliably and easily cleaned of all gluten, as I did find a used electric waffle maker with cast iron plates. Looked nice, and would make 4 waffles at once. Oh well. Wishful thinking...

Glad to know it shouldn't require repeated flipping. Figured it'd cool down too much while waiting for one side to finish.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Takala, that's the cast iron one I referred to, only I found it on Amazon. Reviews there are mixed as well. Guess I'll have to take the plunge and hope for the best.

Sure wish cast iron could be reliably and easily cleaned of all gluten, as I did find a used electric waffle maker with cast iron plates. Looked nice, and would make 4 waffles at once. Oh well. Wishful thinking...

Glad to know it shouldn't require repeated flipping. Figured it'd cool down too much while waiting for one side to finish.

Could you "clean" the iron of gluten by making several batches of gluten-free waffles and throwing them away....and by the 3rd batch or so, the next batch would be safe? Sounds reasonable...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could you "clean" the iron of gluten by making several batches of gluten-free waffles and throwing them away....and by the 3rd batch or so, the next batch would be safe? Sounds reasonable...

I wish it were that easy. But the seasoning of cast iron tends to form layers such that it could harbor gluten for who-knows-how-long. The only way I'd trust it is to "sand-blast" the grids down to bare metal, and season them again.

I did find a cast iron waffle maker made in Belgium, for professional chefs, but of course it's brutally expensive.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't you use the typical electric ones? I have a cuisinart one that is amazing. I got it brand new and have only used gluten-free bisquick in it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't you use the typical electric ones? I have a cuisinart one that is amazing. I got it brand new and have only used gluten-free bisquick in it.

I'm with Rice Guy here - I haven't used any cookware with teflon or other chemical based non-stick coating for over ten years, long before I had to go gluten free, ever since I read about one minute scratch and the toxin slowly and systematically releases into your food. There are enough toxins around that are hard to avoid but this is something I can control. One day I believe science will understand that it's the synergy of chemicals in food, plastics leaching into bottled water, mercury in tooth fillings, fire retardants on airplanes, etc., that permeate us and (sneakily) cause a good number of diseases and disorders.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't you use the typical electric ones? I have a cuisinart one that is amazing. I got it brand new and have only used gluten-free bisquick in it.

As I mentioned in the first post, all the typical ones on the market today have chemical-based non-stick coatings. These contain BPA and/or other toxic substances.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure wish cast iron could be reliably and easily cleaned of all gluten, as I did find a used electric waffle maker with cast iron plates. Looked nice, and would make 4 waffles at once. Oh well. Wishful thinking...

Were the plates removable? If they were then what about reseasoning it? There are people on here that say they have put their cast iron pans in the oven on the cleaning cycle to remove the gluten and then reseason.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's this one: http://www.texsport.net/cast-iron-waffle-maker-p-466.html

I think the brand is texport...

Oh, yes. I did find that one on Amazon too, but the vague description leaves me wondering if it's worth the extra cost. The reviews are less than encouraging, apparently due largely to very poor quality.

Were the plates removable? If they were then what about reseasoning it? There are people on here that say they have put their cast iron pans in the oven on the cleaning cycle to remove the gluten and then reseason.

Yeah, the grids/plates were removable, and believe me I did consider ways to clean them effectively. However, given the uneven surfaces, it'd really take some doing to get them to the point where I'd feel confident that there isn't any gluten remaining. My oven doesn't have a "cleaning cycle" anyway. It can't get that hot.

I don't know. I'm wondering if maybe a wire brush - the sort used on an electric drill that spins at high speed, thereby scouring the grids down to bare metal, might just work. But this whole endeavor would cost quite a bit more than the stove top waffle iron.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thought I'd update this...

So, I did end up purchasing the cast iron one which can be used on the stove top. It actually works better than I had anticipated. The batter doesn't run out unless I overfill it, which I have admittedly done a few times, as I figure out just how much is needed. But thankfully it doesn't really drip out. The excess generally oozes out slowly, cooking as it emerges, so it doesn't usually mess up the stove. The more effectively the batter can expand, the less is required to fully fill the grid as it cooks. Working out the recipe for just the right texture is the tricky part, given my particular dietary restrictions.

Too much oil will cause it to drip out as you open it, so brushing on a minimal amount is important. Count on using a basting/pastry brush. You'll never regret the investment if you don't already have one. I chose one with natural bristles of course.

Once the waffle is done on both sides, I lift off the top half of the iron, and turn out the finished waffle onto a plate or cooling rack. The cooking rack is a nice way to do it, because otherwise, steam can collect under the hot waffle, which could obviously make that side soggy.

However, removing the protective wax coating which the manufacturer puts on to prevent rust before it sells was a messy and time-consuming process. Seasoning it went easy, and didn't smoke or smell up the place, since I didn't follow any of the poor recommendations given by numerous people all over the Internet. I used a very minimal amount of high temp cooking oil (safflower), and just kept it on the burner for about 90 minutes, on a low enough setting so as to not smoke. Did that separately for each side, with the two sides assembled. The seasoning has continued to develop with each use, which is expected of course.

I hope this helps others enjoy homemade gluten-free waffles!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,124
    • Total Posts
      929,060
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      63,536
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    MissingPizza
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I actually looked into growing my own, I hear they grow GREAT on coffee grounds. Issues is all starting seeds, and spore batches EVERYWHERE are on rye, wheat, and barely seeds. LITERALLY, the standard for growing them is planting the spores on gluten containing grains. Check yourself on this, while mentioned in several articles the gluten protein is not in the grown mushroom cap/plant. If anything I might have issues with gluten at the base or stalk in which case playing it safe by just harvesting the caps and washing them would be good. I just wish they would use something like buckwheat, rice, sorgum, etc for a seed to put the spores on........I know it is paranoia just saying. Side note I have had no issues with the last 7 batches of mushrooms I have purchased, I even tried the overly sensitive nima on a batch of them blended with a smiley, and these where unwashed ones. SO yes it is a hit and miss thing. I found some brands have never given me issues like a few local portabellos, and polar canned. While others from a local farm got me twice with the bella mushrooms.   As to Gemini response, yes I have the same issues with certain foods always making me sick......olives, peanuts, pork, few others, No logical reason I just very sick and start puking violently when I eat them.    I will admit sometimes things make me sick in weird ways almost like gluten but not. Hell last time I spent 4 days on a elimination diet just ot learn it was the oddest things, a batch of rancid almond butter was doing it. I thought it was just overly roasted but fact was it was just starting to go rancid. I know this was not gluten by day 2 as I analyzed the effects which were a little different.  
    • Hi Mermaid's Mom I used to always feel very hot and found it very difficult living in a hot country, which I did a few years ago.   Since my diagnosis and adopting a gluten free diet I've felt cold in a way I never have before.  I don't know if it is a coincidence, but it seems to me a bit too much of a coincidence! I think the first port of call is to check if your daughter has a thyroid issue.   I assumed that was my problem but the TSH and T4 tests say things are good, but my friends on this forum say I need to have other levels looked at so possibly I do have a problem lurking. Problem is that here in the UK it is difficult to have 'a full thyroid panel' under the National Health Service.  If you can get one for your daughter it would be worth a try, I'm sure.    
    • So 3+ weeks gluten-free.  She is on B12 weekly injections, iron and magnesium supplements. She has ALWAYS run hot.  Never - literally never cold. I noticed that she is now sleeping in socks and a hoodie.  Every night. Now during the day she has more than a few times said she is freezing. Now I have ALWAYS been a freezing person.  The only one -everyone else in the family runs hot but me.  I am abnormally cold.  But even I am not cold when she says she is?? Any thoughts?
    • Knowing my luck, the fish would get Celiac disease and I'd have to stop eating them too!!! lolol   Thanks.......
    • You can try some basic tips: Eat a high-protein breakfast. Avoid sugary drinks and fruit juice. Drink water a half hour before meals. Choose weight loss-friendly foods. Eat soluble fiber. Drink tea. Eat mostly whole, unprocessed foods. Eat your food slowly. Don't be so upset. A lot of people don't receive results when they just start their diet. As for that was the same when I started my diet, I start losing weight on the third month. I try to avoid some food and especially coffee I threw away coffee from my life. So I drink only tea, I bought special Tea here. I think you can try it too. Keep going!
  • Upcoming Events