• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
heyteacher

Spouse Is Nonsupportive

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I don't know where to put this so I guess this is as good as any??? I don't have an official diagnosis, so I am in limbo so to speak.

However, my husband is not supportive of me trying to go gluten free. He isn't supportive of any health issue that I have. The diarrhea, nausea, not being able to eat without being VERY close to a bathroom, the migraines. I believe all of these things (and more) could be caused by either a gluten sensitivity, or celiac. But I need his support to try and go gluten-free. We have 4 children ages 18, down to 12. One being a special needs child that has Down Syndrome. We are very busy, like most families, and I need him to help me so that I can start to hopefully feel better. I also think he feels that Gluten-Free food will be quite expensive, and it will be--I think--my son was on a Gluten-Free diet for about a year. The food was very pricey, and hard to find in our area (very rural)

I have had a colonoscopy a few years ago, and doc diagnosed IBS. SO husband wants that to be the end of the discussion and I just live this way forever. Well, I've tried for 3 years. I'm tired, feel awful, and need to get something figured out.

I have shown him things on-line to try and show him that my symptoms are very simliar to people that have celiac disease. He still thinks it's all in my head. Even though I have to run to the bathroom after eating some (most) meals. I can't eat if we are in the car or at one of my kids ballgames for fear that I won't be able to get to a bathroom. Crazy way to live if you ask me.....

I welcome any suggestions that you have for me. He isn't a terrible person. He has strong opinions. He tends to think if we don't deal with it I will just get better as fast as I got "sick" He gets upset when I go to a Dr. mostly due to the $. He tends to think I am fine since there is no fever or visible signs for him to see. I have no rash. It's all intestinal--for lack of a better word--although I do get sores in my mouth, like a canker sore. Unrelated???

Thanks so much for any advice you can give me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


I'm so sorry you're going through this, and that you don't have the support of your family. And I promise I won't think negatively of your husband. I had a lot of trouble getting my mother to understand and it didn't make me love her any less, it's just hard. I hope he comes around for you. It's tough because it sounds like a lot of his concerns are financial? I'm going to offer up a few ideas that might help, indirectly.

Do you think it would help him understand if you were able to be diagnosed? I get that if you went through testing and it was negative that might cause some problems with him...but perhaps if you got a doctor to back you up, it might help. Canker sores, by the way, are VERY common in celiac disease patients. I get them too. There are also many experts who have found correlations between Down Syndrome and celiac. You don't say why your son was on a gluten-free diet (is it the same child who has Down?), but for some reason, rates of celiac have been found to be higher among people with Down. You might want to consider having your children tested as well as yourself.

A colonoscopy would not have been able to tell your doctor anything about celiac. Celiac patients are commonly diagnosed with IBS before they get the real answer, because IBS is a kind of diagnosis where the doctors think "I don't know what's wrong with you, so we'll call it IBS and call it a day." If you wanted to me tested, you would need to find a willing doctor, who would first run a blood antibody test and then usually an endoscopy with intestinal biopsies afterwards. Some people stop after a blood test if it's positive, but many do the biopsies then to evaluate the villi damage.

I know this will probably not help you convince your husband, but if it makes you fell any better...gluten-free does not have to be as expensive as some people make it. It is expensive if you simply replace all the foods you normally eat with gluten-free packaged versions, and if some people have money to do that then it's their choice, but many of us (including myself) don't. I eat lots of fruits and vegetables, and I buy things like beans (dry), nuts, rice, millet, etc. in bulk to save money. I try not to eat too many baked goods because it's just not good for you, but I occasionally treat myself with a loaf of homemade bread or a batch of cookies or cupcakes. Since I make them myself, I get a lot more mileage out of the money I spend on special flours. And I make them last by baking sparingly. It's something to get used to, but it's healthier and cheaper that way. There are many, many foods that are naturally gluten-free.

All in all...I really hope you are able to get things sorted out and get yourself healthy. Almost all of us on here know what it's like to be sick for a long time and be longing for an answer...then you finally find an inkling and it can be very frustrating when you cannot get support from your family. We're here for you, though, whatever that's worth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help you with regard to the unsupportive husband, but I can help you with eating gluten free. Many people feel that they need to have gluten-free substitutes for all of their favorite foods--you know, the foods that make them sick. It's much easier to eat natural whole foods than to buy gluten-free processed foods, frozen foods, and special breads, cookies, etc. You can still eat eggs, dairy (unless it's an issue, too), meat, nuts, vegetables, beans, and fruits. The gluten-free pasta isn't too expensive, in my opinion, and Tinkiyada is the best--chances are good that your whole family won't notice the difference. Bread can be expensive, but if everyone else is eating a sandwich, you can always eat something else. Be careful about eating soy--many of us can't tolerate it. Also, soy sauce has gluten in it, but you can always use wheat-free Tamari sauce. Your husband, even if not supportive, doesn't have to play any role in your diet whatsoever. If you cook the food, you can decide that it will be natural whole foods...and if the family wants to use condiments that contain gluten, that's fine. Your husband shouldn't be impacted very much by your change in diet...and, hopefully, when he sees how much better you feel, he will begin to see the light. Also, if you want to start feeling well ASAP, try eliminating all grains, including rice, and begin adding them back into your diet one by one. Once you know that you can tolerate them, you'll have more ingredients to work with. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry you are not getting the support you need right now at home. If you haven't gone gluten free then if you want you could request the blood work: IgA/IgG tissue transglutaminase(tTG), IgA/IgG deamidated gliadin peptide(DGP), and total IgA. You could also do a scope/biopsy. If you want testing, and after you exhaust all the testing you want, do a good three montht trial of the gluten free diet. Testing doesn't always give us all the answers and can have about a 30% false negative rate. Also I think there is a increased risk for celiac disease in people with down syndrome. Here are a few links for you to review. Feel free to ask questions. There are a lot of good people on here to help!

http://www.celiac.com/categories/Celiac-Disease-Research%3A-Associated-Diseases-and-Disorders/Down-Syndrome-and-Celiac-Disease/

http://www.ds-health.com/celiac.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh no! It is so frustrating when people just don't get it! Everything said so far is totally right, eating gluten-free doesn't have to break the bank. Hopefully, it will make you feel so much better that your husband will have no choice but to agree. I agree than an actual do diagnosis from the doc would help immensely too, some people are just really black and white about the whole thing and need the diagnosis. Also, try to think that it's really hard for him to see you so uncomfortable. I remember my husband being so frustrated because he wanted to fix it for me, and for a husband, it's hard when they can't. Be patient, it sounds like he loves you a lot so he will come around expecially if you start feeling WAY better! Best of Luck - A Freaking Celiac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


HeyTeacher,

I am a bit in the same situation than you and I wonder if there is anyone here who could share about how supportive their husband/wife are? I am questionning myself right now on what I should expect from my spouse, like what would be a'normal' level of attention from him regarding this matter? Any concrete examples of support?

Personnally, I would need some help with the cooking. I feel right now it is overwhelming to cook new recipies all the time and look for gluten free ingredients at the store, or supply with alternative ingredients. I am reallly doing my best to making it a project, but sometimes lack motivation. I would like him to take over sometimes and of course to feel like I am not inventing all of this to grab attention.

Any role model here to share?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is hard when we don't have the support from the ones we love. However, we also have to do what is best for ourselves at the same time. I also have a teen at home and wondered how I was going to change things so that the family wasn't inconvenienced but it never became an issue. They eat my gluten-free pasta and cannot tell the difference. If I make a gluten-free cake they like it. I know my husband does not totally understand and keeps forgetting that I cannot have gluten which I find kind of amazing since I have been gluten-free for 5 months. Focus on yourself. Focus on what your body needs to get well. I know you said you were trying this and by the symptoms listed I would definately try my best to follow a strict gluten-free diet (read labels). It might not hurt to stop dairy for a couple months too. That might sound like alot but if you are having stomach issues dairy very easily could be tearing you up. When my gastro suggested I go off dairy I was already on a gluten-free diet and I was thinking that I would have nothing left to eat. It is a mazing how creative we become. As it turned out for me not only do I have celiac but I am dairy intolerant, high fructose intolerant and salicylate sensative.

I was pretty darn sick before I went off glutens and dairy and hubby knew that. My brain was a continual "fry" zone, my stomach was a wreck, I had lost part of my taste, I was dizzy, my vision was messed up and I shared all this with him. I was always the energertic type, always had everything done and always organized and that all kind of went in the toilet. I was not the one to be making regualr doc visits and here I was going on a regualr basic......so much so the receptionist asked me if I worked somewhere in the hospital, lol!

Big difference was when I started feeling better and he could see it. Not long afterward he had problems with gout, doc wanted to up his meds. Get this, he told her that he had seen what I was doing to change my diet and saw the improvements in my health and wanted to try and control his gout thru diet as well. He was set up witha nutritionist and he has taken it seriously.

Eventhough we feel weak and want to crawl in bed and want someone there to lean on, sometimes we have to be the strong one and set the example. You can do this!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only advice I would give you is to seek a counselor on how to deal with the "unsupportive" husband. If you think you "need" his support to go gluten free, you will never go gluten free. Like I don't "need" my spouse's "support" to use my inhaler during an asthma attack - my need to use a medical treatment to save my life is independent of his feelings about it. If he ever tried to belittle that need, he would be shown the door. Quickly.

I mean, really, the absurdity of it - if he wanted the economy model wife with no special dietary needs because of an autoimmune problem, and able to subsist on really cheap food, he should have selected that one during the courting phase.... what was that phrase again, in sickness and in health? This is the only autoimmune disease which can mostly be relieved of symptoms just by changing one's diet. Most of the others are real roller coasters of (oftentimes expensive $$$) treatments with bad side effects or very deteriorating conditions. This is the hand I was dealt. Other people have other problems.

When both spouses are healthy, the household tends to run better. The one thing you really don't want to happen is to be approaching old age and be in poor health, if you have the power to change it, it's bad enough to be approaching old age and be in mediocre or even good health. I can't imagine doing this with a spouse who would blow off my health needs, especially if it were approaching any sort of crisis situation. And I was bad - we thought I was going to not be able to do steps, and deliberately went to a one story ranch house a dozen years ago, before I did the diet change, because I was getting such bad neurological symptoms and having arthritic flares.

I also live in a rural area, so it's a bit of a drive to find the specialty ingredients I use for baking. But this is a good state and area compared to some others (we make jokes about the area about 90 miles north of here, which is this wasteland of store/restaurant options - yeesh. Take a cooler or starve. ) I tend to stock up when I find something on sale, and we have an extra, small refrigerator in the garage for storing things that don't fit into the freezer. I tend to freeze anything like nuts that might go buggy, because we live in a warmer climate, and this keeps things from going rancid more quickly or getting infested. It's a lot easier to go to the fridge for a bag of something gluten free, than to drive 30 - 70 miles roundtrip to get it or having to mail order it. I end up doing baking more for him than for me, since he may want a sandwich more often than I do, as I don't actually eat as much "bread" as a regular person, and hardly ever do cereal, and when I do bake, it's with high protein things like seed, bean, and nut meals because I am relatively carbohydrate intolerant. We have discovered that while I am able to function on a high protein/fat diet, he will crash and splat metabolically if he mimics me completely, and therefore the "safe snacks" lunchbox we tend to take with us will have some carbs for him, and I will make sure he EATS some before we do an outdoor activity. My spouse decided to go gluten free at home after seeing what happens when I get cross contaminated accidentally, but still eats gluten out if he wants to. We actually did not have that much of a transition other than changing some cookware, now cereal brands and a few other food item brands are different because they are gluten-free, we subbed rice pastas for wheat pastas, we keep ricecakes and corn tortillas as staples, and we don't eat out as much and baked things tend to be homemade.... and I store more dry goods than the normal person and play around with recipes a bit more.

So I can do this or be an invalid..... wasn't really much of a question which option was better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a bit in the same situation than you and I wonder if there is anyone here who could share about how supportive their husband/wife are? I am questionning myself right now on what I should expect from my spouse, like what would be a'normal' level of attention from him regarding this matter? Any concrete examples of support?

I guess I'm very fortunate as my husband is beyond supportive. His attitude is 'we'll do whatever it takes to get you feeling better. All I want is for you to be better.' I'm in the process of doing an elimination diet and we're working through the kitchen (he's working on eating all of the gluten-containing foods in the pantry and as he finishes those, we're switching it all over to gluten-free foods). We will eventually have a totally gluten-free house, though he may eat other things when he's away from home. He's one of my biggest advocates when we are out somewhere to make sure I stay as far away from gluten as possible.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sores in your mouth can definitely be related. I had them all the time and they disappeared after I went gluten-free.

As someone else said, it doesn't have to be expensive as long as you don't try to replace bread, cakes, muffins, etc. Just make regular food that's naturally gluten-free.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I don't know where to put this so I guess this is as good as any??? I don't have an official diagnosis, so I am in limbo so to speak.

However, my husband is not supportive of me trying to go gluten free. He isn't supportive of any health issue that I have. The diarrhea, nausea, not being able to eat without being VERY close to a bathroom, the migraines. I believe all of these things (and more) could be caused by either a gluten sensitivity, or celiac. But I need his support to try and go gluten-free. We have 4 children ages 18, down to 12. One being a special needs child that has Down Syndrome. We are very busy, like most families, and I need him to help me so that I can start to hopefully feel better. I also think he feels that Gluten-Free food will be quite expensive, and it will be--I think--my son was on a Gluten-Free diet for about a year. The food was very pricey, and hard to find in our area (very rural)

I have had a colonoscopy a few years ago, and doc diagnosed IBS. SO husband wants that to be the end of the discussion and I just live this way forever. Well, I've tried for 3 years. I'm tired, feel awful, and need to get something figured out.

I have shown him things on-line to try and show him that my symptoms are very simliar to people that have celiac disease. He still thinks it's all in my head. Even though I have to run to the bathroom after eating some (most) meals. I can't eat if we are in the car or at one of my kids ballgames for fear that I won't be able to get to a bathroom. Crazy way to live if you ask me.....

I welcome any suggestions that you have for me. He isn't a terrible person. He has strong opinions. He tends to think if we don't deal with it I will just get better as fast as I got "sick" He gets upset when I go to a Dr. mostly due to the $. He tends to think I am fine since there is no fever or visible signs for him to see. I have no rash. It's all intestinal--for lack of a better word--although I do get sores in my mouth, like a canker sore. Unrelated???

Thanks so much for any advice you can give me.

Before you try to go gluten-free, get to the dr and get blood tests for celiac. Do not tell your husband about the tests if they are negative. But if they are positvie you will need to have your doctor talk to your husband and explain this is not in your head. If the test are negative you will need to convince you husband you are truely very sick. If this means you need to "forget" to flush the toilet a few times, so be it. Or if this means you need to be curled up in a fetal position unable to do the dishes or take care of the kids sometimes, so be it. He needs to SEE the signs that something is really wrong and that may mean you stop pushing through your suffering in order to seem "normal".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before you try to go gluten-free, get to the dr and get blood tests for celiac. Do not tell your husband about the tests if they are negative. But if they are positvie you will need to have your doctor talk to your husband and explain this is not in your head. If the test are negative you will need to convince you husband you are truely very sick. If this means you need to "forget" to flush the toilet a few times, so be it. Or if this means you need to be curled up in a fetal position unable to do the dishes or take care of the kids sometimes, so be it. He needs to SEE the signs that something is really wrong and that may mean you stop pushing through your suffering in order to seem "normal".

Thanks everyone for your responses. I appreciate it so very much :D I know I have to do something about this mess, I hate feeling crappy. I know it's up to me to get things going with my doctor. I have to get over my "fear" and just make the call and get an appointment.

GlutenFreeManna--I think you are on to something. I keep pluggin away even when I feel absolutely awful. It may take me actually retreating to bed (more often) or being forgetful with the toilet in order for him to actually see what is happening with me. I work incredibly hard to go to work, attend my kids sporting activities, basically keep the house going even on my bad days. Maybe I need to let some things go and he will get a better picture of how I feel. Or maybe he will get mad that things aren't done around the house. I don't know how he will react, but it's a place to start. I have NEVER, EVER been one to "rock the boat" but my health has got to improve.

Thanks again everyone, it is beyond wonderful to have some support. Something that I have not had since these symptoms started 3 years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your responses. I appreciate it so very much :D I know I have to do something about this mess, I hate feeling crappy. I know it's up to me to get things going with my doctor. I have to get over my "fear" and just make the call and get an appointment.

GlutenFreeManna--I think you are on to something. I keep pluggin away even when I feel absolutely awful. It may take me actually retreating to bed (more often) or being forgetful with the toilet in order for him to actually see what is happening with me. I work incredibly hard to go to work, attend my kids sporting activities, basically keep the house going even on my bad days. Maybe I need to let some things go and he will get a better picture of how I feel. Or maybe he will get mad that things aren't done around the house. I don't know how he will react, but it's a place to start. I have NEVER, EVER been one to "rock the boat" but my health has got to improve.

Thanks again everyone, it is beyond wonderful to have some support. Something that I have not had since these symptoms started 3 years ago.

I'm in the "mom martyr" club too. We work through flu, cold, headache and are just generally tough. Maybe time to give that a rest when you are legitimately feeling bad. Good luck!

My other suggestion is to go to this gluten-free crockpot website. Free recipes. Great for families and could end up reducing your food budget even. http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/ The author's daughter has celiac. It doesn't use many specialty items and your whole family would have a good, gluten-free meal. Her instructions talk about what products are ok or need to be replaced with a gluten-free version.

Regular ingredients that are naturally gluten-free are not too expensive. Potatoes, rice, veggies, meat, chicken, beans. Use the crockpot to make gluten-free meals while you're at work.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Before you try to go gluten-free, get to the dr and get blood tests for celiac. Do not tell your husband about the tests if they are negative. But if they are positvie you will need to have your doctor talk to your husband and explain this is not in your head. If the test are negative you will need to convince you husband you are truely very sick. If this means you need to "forget" to flush the toilet a few times, so be it. Or if this means you need to be curled up in a fetal position unable to do the dishes or take care of the kids sometimes, so be it. He needs to SEE the signs that something is really wrong and that may mean you stop pushing through your suffering in order to seem "normal".

That tatic is DISGUSTING, and will probably backfire. And can by very dangerous to try if you have animals in the house and or small children. All of the 3 dogs I have had and two out of three cats drank/played in the toilet water. Leaving poop in it could make them very very sick. And I for one get very annoyed and upset when people forget to flush the toilet, especially if the person was an adult who should know better. If he feels the same way I do, you are putting more strain on your relationship and he might be even less willing to accept there is a problem since doing so is very passive agressive.

There are better ways to it is across that you are sick. Like, asking if he could buy more imodium, or kaopectate often. Or just actually talking to him about it and how his lack of support is making you feel. Then make an appt with the dr and talk to the dr about your symptoms. Whether or not he likes it doesn't really matter. As you are an adult and don't need his permission to go to the dr for a consultation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In your situation I would start making meals that are naturally gluten free but are also completely normal. Chili, tacos, shepherd's pie, stir-fry (with gluten free soy sauce, there are cheap brands), roasted chicken w/ potatoes and veggies, ect... Don't even tell your husband for a week or so. Then announce that you've been on a gluten-free diet all week and he didn't even notice nor did it significantly raise your food bills. He will be left with little to argue about!

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HeyTeacher,

I am a bit in the same situation than you and I wonder if there is anyone here who could share about how supportive their husband/wife are? I am questionning myself right now on what I should expect from my spouse, like what would be a'normal' level of attention from him regarding this matter? Any concrete examples of support?

Personnally, I would need some help with the cooking. I feel right now it is overwhelming to cook new recipies all the time and look for gluten free ingredients at the store, or supply with alternative ingredients. I am reallly doing my best to making it a project, but sometimes lack motivation. I would like him to take over sometimes and of course to feel like I am not inventing all of this to grab attention.

Any role model here to share?

I don't know how supportive the 'average' spouse would be, but my husband has noticed such a huge change in me since I went gluten free that he's almost more strict about it than I am. He usually eats gluten free with me (even at restaurants) and we bring very little gluten into the house. It's just easier that way.

He does most of the cooking (which was the case before going gluten free) so he makes a lot of Indian & Mexican recipes, which are generally gluten free. Or we have fish or meat with steamed vegetables quite a lot - or, in the winter, chile & stews are easy. It doesn't have to be expensive.

I think the main reason he's so supportive is that, frankly, I'm much much much more pleasant to be around when I'm off gluten. In addition to the migraines & stomach issues, I have crazy emotional responses to gluten - and who wouldn't rather have a normal wife than a crazy one? lol.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That tatic is DISGUSTING, and will probably backfire. And can by very dangerous to try if you have animals in the house and or small children. All of the 3 dogs I have had and two out of three cats drank/played in the toilet water. Leaving poop in it could make them very very sick. And I for one get very annoyed and upset when people forget to flush the toilet, especially if the person was an adult who should know better. If he feels the same way I do, you are putting more strain on your relationship and he might be even less willing to accept there is a problem since doing so is very passive agressive.

There are better ways to it is across that you are sick. Like, asking if he could buy more imodium, or kaopectate often. Or just actually talking to him about it and how his lack of support is making you feel. Then make an appt with the dr and talk to the dr about your symptoms. Whether or not he likes it doesn't really matter. As you are an adult and don't need his permission to go to the dr for a consultation.

I think the OP got my point just fine. My point was not to be disgusting or play passive agressive games but to be REAL and honest about what is happening. Obviously her just TELLING her husband how she is feeling is not working. He needs to SEE that she is really sick as well. Women especially like to play the martyr and push through their pain and sickness. We like to try to be superwomen and do it all even when sick, but when it comes to our health we need to not wait to make changes or see a dr. A husband who loves her will not expect her to stay sick and not go to the dr because he thinks "she just needs more kaopectate" to get through the day. If her being sick (notice I didn't say her "playing sick", she really IS sick but she's pretending she's not and pushing through), anyway if her BEING sick ruins their relationship then their relationship is not very strong to begin with. As far as "needing his permission"--no she doesn't but she will need his support if she plans to go gluten free successfully. Also you know nothing about their money situation. Some women don't work outside of the house and can't just go spending money on dr's appointments without her husband knowing about it. Spending money on dr's when they haven't agreed upon it could cause more strain on their relationship too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That tatic is DISGUSTING, and will probably backfire. And can by very dangerous to try if you have animals in the house and or small children. All of the 3 dogs I have had and two out of three cats drank/played in the toilet water. Leaving poop in it could make them very very sick. And I for one get very annoyed and upset when people forget to flush the toilet, especially if the person was an adult who should know better. If he feels the same way I do, you are putting more strain on your relationship and he might be even less willing to accept there is a problem since doing so is very passive agressive.

There are better ways to it is across that you are sick. Like, asking if he could buy more imodium, or kaopectate often. Or just actually talking to him about it and how his lack of support is making you feel. Then make an appt with the dr and talk to the dr about your symptoms. Whether or not he likes it doesn't really matter. As you are an adult and don't need his permission to go to the dr for a consultation.

I am very sorry- but if someones kids are playing in the toilet then I am afraid that is far more disgusting. You let your pets drink toilet water?? Wow. Thats all I have to say to that. :o

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started out telling my husband all of my symptoms, appointments, tests, on and on and on. Over the years, he has become less and less involved (never was very involved) and basically takes the route of ignoring the situation. Of course it's not happening to him so it's easy to ignore when I continue to try and keep doing my job away from home, as well as my job @ home and with the kids, house, ect. But....I am just getting to the point that I can't keep going like the Energizer Bunny. I am t.i.r.e.d and grouchy, and sick.

I think we have a good marriage. But....we have 4 kids, 3 very busy kids and one with special needs. The one with special needs can't eat by mouth. He is a pricey one :rolleyes: costs about $1,500.00 a month just to feed him. I am not complaining, it's just a fact and something we have to plan for as a monthly expense just like we do our house payment.

While I don't make a habit of leaving my house/bathroom is a state of disarray it just might work with him. I apologize if this seem "gross" of "unhealthy" the way I see it desperate times call for desperate measures. If I ask him to get some type of medication he would think that medication would make me feel better and on we go with our evening plans. He has not health problems and doesn't get it when others do, it's not just me. My kids, his extended family, he thinks everyone should be able to take a tylenol and feel better, after all that's what he does, works for him right??

Again, I appreciate all of your helpful suggestions. I did approach him about going back to my doc for testing, he was not "a fan" of my suggestion at least not now. I can't just go behind his back and run up a dr bill for testing. How would I feel if he did that and then we had hundreds of dollars to pay off, well probably not very good. Maybe for now I will go gluten free with the natural foods that were mentioned fruits, veggies, meats and just see how I feel.I don't know it doesn't give me any diagnosis that might help him, but I don't see that happening. Soooooooo, try plan B, or C B)

Thanks so much for letting me bend your ears AGAIN!! I just get started and out it all comes, forgive my ramblings. It does help to get things "out"

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just be aware that some people after going gluten free just to see, get such severe reactions to eating gluten and end up too sick to do a gluten challenge and so remain undiagnosed. Just something to keep in mind!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I think the OP got my point just fine. My point was not to be disgusting or play passive agressive games but to be REAL and honest about what is happening. Obviously her just TELLING her husband how she is feeling is not working. He needs to SEE that she is really sick as well. Women especially like to play the martyr and push through their pain and sickness. We like to try to be superwomen and do it all even when sick, but when it comes to our health we need to not wait to make changes or see a dr. A husband who loves her will not expect her to stay sick and not go to the dr because he thinks "she just needs more kaopectate" to get through the day. If her being sick (notice I didn't say her "playing sick", she really IS sick but she's pretending she's not and pushing through), anyway if her BEING sick ruins their relationship then their relationship is not very strong to begin with. As far as "needing his permission"--no she doesn't but she will need his support if she plans to go gluten free successfully. Also you know nothing about their money situation. Some women don't work outside of the house and can't just go spending money on dr's appointments without her husband knowing about it. Spending money on dr's when they haven't agreed upon it could cause more strain on their relationship too.

I have never seen a copay from an insurance company costing more than 100$ for a PCP visit. In fact most are much less, mine are 15$. Unless you don't have health insurance which is another problem all together. And she never said that money was an issue preventing her from seeing a dr. Second, if your husband is controlling all of the finances soo tightly that she doesn't have access to money for ONE copay and is forbidding her from going to the dr, then you are getting into the territory of abuse. Plus, she has never said that her husband is forbidding her from going to the dr just that he isn't a fan. My husband isn't a fan of the fact that I take ambien every night to sleep, however I continue to take it because it is needed. There is a difference between not being a fan and saying no. If her husband said no more drs or tests my advice would be different. However, since not being a fan really means that he isn't supportive or encouraging her to see a dr, I see no problem with her going to the dr for a consultation. For tests with bigger out of pocket expenses like the endoscopy you would want to discuss it with them. Especially since in order to be accurately tested for celiac you have to be eating gluten for months prior to the test. So if she goes gluten-free now she has just lost any chance of getting a dx. Maybe I grew up in a strange household, but my parents NEVER had to get permission from each other to go to the dr when they were sick and that is the way that my husband and I have arranged it too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am very sorry- but if someones kids are playing in the toilet then I am afraid that is far more disgusting. You let your pets drink toilet water?? Wow. Thats all I have to say to that. :o

Young children do alot of things that are disgusting because they don't know better. My family does not let the animals drink from the toilet. We actually have to keep the door shut tight to keep them out. But, sometimes they find a way it, usually when we have had guests or if the door didn't get shut all the way. Plus, dogs in general are attracted to poo. Some dogs roll in it other dogs like to eat it. So a new smell might attract a dog who doesn't drink from the toilet to try it. It was also to point out the possible dangers of purposefully leaving feces in the toilet just to prove a point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never seen a copay from an insurance company costing more than 100$ for a PCP visit. In fact most are much less, mine are 15$. Unless you don't have health insurance which is another problem all together. And she never said that money was an issue preventing her from seeing a dr. Second, if your husband is controlling all of the finances soo tightly that she doesn't have access to money for ONE copay and is forbidding her from going to the dr, then you are getting into the territory of abuse. Plus, she has never said that her husband is forbidding her from going to the dr just that he isn't a fan. My husband isn't a fan of the fact that I take ambien every night to sleep, however I continue to take it because it is needed. There is a difference between not being a fan and saying no. If her husband said no more drs or tests my advice would be different. However, since not being a fan really means that he isn't supportive or encouraging her to see a dr, I see no problem with her going to the dr for a consultation. For tests with bigger out of pocket expenses like the endoscopy you would want to discuss it with them. Especially since in order to be accurately tested for celiac you have to be eating gluten for months prior to the test. So if she goes gluten-free now she has just lost any chance of getting a dx. Maybe I grew up in a strange household, but my parents NEVER had to get permission from each other to go to the dr when they were sick and that is the way that my husband and I have arranged it too.

Actually, she said in her very first post that money was the reason her husband didn't like her going to the dr a lot. She also shared that she has a special needs child that costs them $1500 a month in medical bills. Even if her husband was super supportive of her getting tested she's bound to feel guilty about it because that's human nature when you are strained financially and physically and trying to be supermom. I'm not going to argue about this anymore though. I just want the OP, heyteacher to know that it is OKAY to do what she needs to do to get her husband on the same page as her in regards to taking care of her medical needs. Again, it's NOT about PERMISSION, it's about SUPPORT or blessing or mutual understanding whatever you want to call it. She will need his help in order to make the change to gluten-free if that's what turns out to be the issue.

Heyteacher, please update us if you go to the dr and find anything out. :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As other posters have mentioned, gluten free eating can be inexpensive, especially if you don't try to replace the gluten containing items with gluten free options (like bread). Potatoes are very inexpensive. Same with rice. Corn tortillas are too, and you can use them for tacos, enchiladas, tostadas and just on the side. Instead of cookies and cakes, serve ice cream, pudding, etc. At first I was stumped with the gluten free thing, but now it has become easier. THe only thing gluteny I buy now is bread, because my son can make himself a sandwich. And a few microwavable items that he can prepare himself as well. I found a few gluten free flours on sale/clearance so I can make the occasional pancake or birthday cake, but overall I have found that it is not any more expensive unless I try to buy prepared packaged foods to replace gluteny items. Now I do buy the occasional gluten free packaged item but it is a treat, and not a staple. The funny thing is that my son really hasn't noticed :) But he does go have pizza with his friends so that helps!

As for the husband. I have had a LOT of intestinal issues-diarrhea, gas, having to run to the bathroom... when I went gluten free, my boyfriend and I discussed it because we eat a lot together. He became very supportive because he noticed that my bathroom issues were so much better. Now I have a small apartment, so it was kind of obvious when I had to run to the bathroom and the walls are thin! We joked about it because now things are much quieter :) So perhaps your husband will notice the difference once you start cooking inexpensive gluten free foods. Start with steak, potatoes and a nice salad! You can't go wrong with that one :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That tatic is DISGUSTING, and will probably backfire. And can by very dangerous to try if you have animals in the house and or small children. All of the 3 dogs I have had and two out of three cats drank/played in the toilet water. Leaving poop in it could make them very very sick. And I for one get very annoyed and upset when people forget to flush the toilet, especially if the person was an adult who should know better. If he feels the same way I do, you are putting more strain on your relationship and he might be even less willing to accept there is a problem since doing so is very passive agressive.

There are better ways to it is across that you are sick. Like, asking if he could buy more imodium, or kaopectate often. Or just actually talking to him about it and how his lack of support is making you feel. Then make an appt with the dr and talk to the dr about your symptoms. Whether or not he likes it doesn't really matter. As you are an adult and don't need his permission to go to the dr for a consultation.

I completely disagree. I think she should go one step further and actively show her husband her BMs each and every time she has one so that he can see the frequency and actually see how screwed and (likely) smelly they are.

It's one thing to SAY to someone "I have to run to the bathroom every time I eat" - it's another for someone to actually SEE it happen.

This reminds me of when I'd tell people that I used to get awful migraines and throw up for hours. They all thought I was exaggerating - I mean, how could you throw up almost constantly for hours? It wasn't until my husband (fiance at the time) told them, "No, you don't understand. She curls up on the floor of the bathroom so that when she needs to throw up - which happens every 20 minutes for 12 hours straight - she doesn't have to go too far." Then they were like, "Really?? She gets THAT sick??"

Sure, it was gross for my husband to hold my hair and get splashed with my puke, but he did it and he understood how sick I was. And so, he did not think I was lying when I'd tell him food would pass through me within an hour or two and would look exactly like it did when it was on my plate. If he had thought I was exaggerating, I would have taken him into the bathroom and shown him.

We all need to get over this fear of poop and other bodily functions. Her husband doesn't believe her - well, seeing is believing. I say go for it.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,911
    • Total Posts
      943,460
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      67,058
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Foxdavfri
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I am sorry that I was not clear.    I only mentioned  your diagnostic background, not to discredit you, but because without any lab results (other than a positive gene test), how can you be sure that gluten (shampoo containing wheat protein) was the actual culprit (not a guess) of your symptoms?  It is common for celiacs to receive follow-up antibodies to monitor their dietary compliance.  This is not perfect, but it is the only tool in the toolbox for now.   My husband has been gluten free 12 years prior to my diagnosis.  He went gluten free per the poor advice of his GP and my allergist.  So, I am not trying to discount your diagnosis at all.  I am just trying to see if other lab tests (e.g. liver tests that were elevated previously for you when you were still consuming gluten) were measured after your shampoo exposure.   I am curious because I have had issues over the last year.  I was glutened last January, had the flu, a tooth infection, a cold and a tooth extraction, three rounds of antibiotics (verified to be gluten free) within a month or so.  Like, you, I am very careful.  I have no idea as to how I was exposed.   The last time I ate out was a year ago and even then it was at at 100% gluten free restaurant.   My hubby did not have any symptoms at this time.  He is like my canary.    I went to my GI and my DGP IgA was off the charts even some three months later.   My celiac-related symptoms diminished in three months, but I struggled with autoimmune hives for six.  My GI offered to do an endoscopy in the summer.  Instead I chose to follow the Fasano diet.  I still was not feeling well.  In December, my antibodies were 80.  They were either on a decline or they were increasing again.  I opted for the endoscopy.  My biopsies revealed a healed small intestine (you could see the villi on the scope too).  But I was diagnosed with chronic gastritis and had a polyp removed.   So, all this time I thought my celiac disease was active, but it was NOT the source of my current gut issues.   Again, my apologies.  I just wanted to know how you know for SURE that hydrologized wheat protein from someone else’s shampoo and conditioner could reach your small intestine to trigger an autoimmune reaction.  Maybe, like me, Gluten was not the actual culprit.    
    • The reason I think it was the shampoo? Process of elimination. Our house is almost entirely gluten free (except for this shampoo which slipped through the cracks until I read the ingredient label). My husband has bread that he eats at lunch, but he practices something that resembles aseptic technique from the lab when he's making his sandwiches. He's been doing this for years now and I've never been glutened from within my home. The previous week I hadn't eaten out, I cooked all my food, I don't eat processed food and I never eat something from a shared facility.  Usually if I get glutened it's a single dose sort of thing and it follows a very predictable course, to the point where I can estimate when I got glutened within 24 hours of when it happened. However, this time, I was feeling achy and arthritic and moody for about a week before it got bad enough for me to recognize it as the result of gluten exposure, at which point we went searching and found the shampoo (and conditioner, which does leave more of a residue than shampoo), which he immediately stopped using. Within three days I was feeling back to normal (which is the usual course for me).  Sure, it could have been something else, but I know how sensitive I am, and, as silly as it sounds, it was the only thing that made sense. The other thing you said: You're correct, mine was not a rock solid celiac diagnosis, but I have no doubt that gluten is the problem. I was SICK. I went through two different gluten challenges in an effort to get a more straightforward diagnosis during which I was a barely functioning human being. Consuming gluten may not have given me blunted villi or elevated antibodies, but it did inflame my gut, and actually started to damage my liver. If you look at my diagnosis thread, I had elevated liver enzymes, which have been correlated with celiac disease in the past. There was no alternative explanation for the liver enzymes, he checked EVERYTHING.  I too am a scientist and I have spent a lot of time with the literature trying to make sense of my condition.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26150087 I also have no doubt that gluten was damaging my intestines in some way, as any prolonged gluten exposure in the past has inevitably been followed by a severe FODMAP intolerance that goes away once I've eliminated the gluten and given myself a month or so to heal.  I also had a very fast diagnosis following the onset of symptoms (~1 year) so it's possible that the disease never had a chance to manifest as full celiac. I wasn't willing to eat gluten long enough to find out. As a result of my diagnosis, hazy as it was, I am *meticulously* gluten free. It is not a fad for me. I don't occasionally cheat. It is my life, for better or worse. All of that being said, I'm not sure what my diagnosis has to do with your question. You say you're not trying to be rude, but when you bring up my diagnosis in a thread that has nothing to do with diagnostics, it seems like you're trying to undermine the validity of my disease or the validity of my input in this forum. If I'm being hypersensitive, I apologize, but that's how you came across on my end. I'll admit that the fact that my diagnosis wasn't more straight forward does make me a bit defensive, but I promise that even if I didn't have a solid diagnosis, I interact with the world as though I did, and I'm not out there giving people the wrong idea about celiac disease by not taking it seriously. If there was a connection between your question and my diagnostics that I missed I would appreciate you giving me the chance to better understand what you were asking. 
    • I am just curious.  As a scientist (and I am not trying to be rude), how can you determine if hydrologized wheat protein from your husband’s shampoo was actually the culprit?  If I recall at your diagnosis, you were seronegative, Marsh Stage I, gene positive,  but your doctor still  suspected celiac disease.  You improved on a gluten diet.  Other than observation, how do you really know?  Could it not be something else that triggered your symptoms?   I firmly believe that even trace amounts of gluten (under 20 ppm), can impact sensitive celiacs.  But traces of a protein within a shampoo from someone else’s hair that was rinsed?    
    • I also can't have dairy but through a series of experiments and a lot of research I think I've pinpointed my problem. It may or may not be the same for you, but I thought I'd share.  There are two kinds of beta-casein protein A1 and A2. We'll call A1 "bad casein" and A2 "good casein". The two proteins differ only in a single amino acid, but this is enough to make it so that they are processed differently in your guy. Bad casein is actually broken down into a casomorphin, which is an opioid peptide. That does not mean that milk gets you high, or is as addictive as heroin, or anything like that, it just means that it can interact with opioid receptors (which the gut has a bunch of). It's worth noting that opioids cause constipation due to their interaction with the opioid receptors in the gut, and that a lot of people feel like cheese and dairy slow things down, but any connection between the two is pure speculation on my part at this point.  Now here's where things get weird. The vast majority of milk cows in the western world are derived from Holstein-like breeds, meaning black and white cows. In a few select places, you'll see farms that use Jersey-type cows, or brown cows (Jersey cows produce less milk than Holsteins, but many connoisseurs feel it's a higher quality milk, particularly for cheese).  Holstein-like cows have A1 and A2 casein (bad and good), however, Jersey-type cows only have A2 (good casein), unless their genetic line involved a Holstein somewhere in the past, which does happen.  A company in New Zealand figured out how to test their cows for these two genes, and selected their herd down to cows that specifically produce ONLY A2 (good) casein. You might have seen it in the store, it's called A2 milk. Some people have had a lot of luck with this milk, though it still doesn't solve the problem of cheese.  I have suspected, due to trial and error and a few accidental exposures, that I have a problem with A1 casein, but not A2. In line with this: I am able to eat sheep and goat dairy without any difficulty, so at least I can still enjoy those cheeses! I am also fortunate because I'm apparently not too sensitive, as I can still eat cow-milk butter. The process of making butter removes *most* (read: enough for me) of the casein.  However, if I eat cow cheese or a baked good with milk, I get really sick. It's a much faster reaction than if I get glutened. Within minutes I'm dizzy and tired and my limbs are heavy. I have to sleep for a couple of hours, and then, over the next couple of days, I'm vulnerable to moodiness and muscles spasms and stomach upset just as though I'd been glutened (though the brain fog isn't as bad). I actually haven't tried A2 milk yet, mostly due to lack of availability (and motivation, I don't miss milk, I miss CHEESE). However, last year, when I was getting ready to go on a trip to Italy, I had a thought. Once, in the recent past, when I'd been testing dairy, I'd had a slice of parmesan cheese. Miracle of miracles, I was fine. I didn't feel a thing! I was so excited that I ran out and got some brie to eat as a snack. That did not go so well... Turns out parmigiano reggiano is made from the milk of the Reggiana variety of cow which is, you guessed it, a brown cow (they say red). I did a little more research and found that dairies in Italy predominantly use brown cows. So I decided to try something. As some of you may know, Italy is something of a haven for celiacs. It's one of the most gluten-free friendly places I've ever been. You can say "senza glutine" in the smallest little town and they don't even bat their eyelashes. You can buy gluten free foods in the pharmacy because they're considered a MEDICAL NECESSITY. If travelling-while-celiac freaks you out, go to Italy. Check out the website for the AIC (Italy's Celiac society), find some accredited restaurants, and GO NUTS. While I was there, I decided to see if I could eat the dairy. I could.  Friends, I ate gelato Every. Single. Night. after that. It was amazing. Between the dairy being safe for me and the preponderance of gluten free options, it was almost like I didn't have dietary restrictions. It was heaven. I want to go back and never leave.  So that's my story. Almost too crazy to believe.  TL;DR: Black and white cows make me sick, brown cows are my friends.
    • I'm a scientist, and I did a little research into the study. Looks valid and it was published in a respected journal.  http://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(17)36352-7/pdf The science looks solid. As someone who didn't have a super clean cut diagnosis before going gluten free, I'd love to see something like this become available. Then again, there's no doubt in my mind that I can't have gluten, so any additional testing would be purely academic. But like I said, I'm a scientist. I can't help myself. 
  • Upcoming Events