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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

My Mom Has Both Celiac Hladq Genes
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My mom has both celiac hladq genes (hla-dq 2,8). Does this mean that I'd definitely have at least 1, both or none?

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If I understand things correctly, you inherit 50% of your genes from each parent. So you have a fifty-fifty chance of having each one. Of the four equally likely situations, one has neither, one has both, and two have one but not the other. This assumes that your mother has only one copy of each gene. If she has two, then it would be impossible for her not to pass at least one on.

If I'm wrong on this, I'm sure one of our more knowledgeable genetics people will correct me.

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Yep, it's that old Punnet square from high school biology

You got either 2 or 8 from Mom, and one of whatever Dad has.

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Yep, your Mom is what's called a super-celiac. She's a heterodimer for the two most commonly associated celiac alleles. You have either 2 or 8 and whatever you got from your Dad. It may be worth testing in yourself, because celiac genes are at a high rate of prevalence in the general population as well. Meaning, there's nothing that says you couldn't have inherited ANOTHER celiac gene from your Dad if he's a latent celiac. One copy on its own, which you know you have however, would be enough to *recommend* a gluten free diet.

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Yep, your Mom is what's called a super-celiac. She's a heterodimer for the two most commonly associated celiac alleles. You have either 2 or 8 and whatever you got from your Dad. It may be worth testing in yourself, because celiac genes are at a high rate of prevalence in the general population as well. Meaning, there's nothing that says you couldn't have inherited ANOTHER celiac gene from your Dad if he's a latent celiac. One copy on its own, which you know you have however, would be enough to *recommend* a gluten free diet.

My mom doesn't seem to have celiac disease yet (unlike me). She's been feeling well and healthy to date. Is it likely (i.e. what are the chances) that she might become celiac?

Also is DQ2.5 different to DQ2?

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My mom doesn't seem to have celiac disease yet (unlike me). She's been feeling well and healthy to date. Is it likely (i.e. what are the chances) that she might become celiac?

From what I've read, the highest associated risk understood AT THIS TIME in western medicine is with two copies of DQ2. In genetic parlance, this would make you homozygous for DQ2. Homozygotes for DQ2 who continue to eat wheat have a 30-40% chance of developing celiac disease over the course of their entire life.

DQ8 is the second most common allele associated with celiac. I can't find hard numbers associated with rate of disease onset, but know that it is associated with both celiac and type 1 diabetes. There are also risks associated with DQ8 and the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Again, none of this means that your mom WILL develop these diseases, just that it's *possible.*

I would highly encourage both of you to enjoy the benefits of a gluten free lifestyle, if possible.

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Thanks for your replies. Just another question: Is it only possible for you to have two HLA-DQ genes?

(i.e. my mom has hla-dq2 and hla-dq8 does that mean she won't have any other hla-dq gene? (e.g. hla-dq3, hla-dq4, etc.)

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Thanks for your replies. Just another question: Is it only possible for you to have two HLA-DQ genes?

(i.e. my mom has hla-dq2 and hla-dq8 does that mean she won't have any other hla-dq gene? (e.g. hla-dq3, hla-dq4, etc.)

These links will help explain things to you. You only have two... one from mom ... one from dad.

You inherited either HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 from your mom, and you inherited one gene from your dad (he has two but you got only one of his).

So essentially, you have one gene for sure that can predispose you to getting celiac disease... however that does not mean that you WILL get celiac disease... just that the possibility exists.

And if you have HLA-DQ2.5 rather than HLA-DQ2.2 you're in the pool of possibility ... but according to this recent study (below link)HLA-DQ2.2 is not a factor in celiac disease, unless it is accompanied by HLA-DQ2.5 (but not vice versa).

Now that you're sufficiently confused, here are the links. :)

(PS: DQ2.2 and DQ2.5 are both referred to in general terms as DQ2, however they have a significant difference that causes DQ2.5 to be directly related to celiac disease, whereas DQ2.2 is not unless it is accompanied by DQ2.5) Its all explained in the link. ;)

http://www.pnas.org/content/100/21/12390.full

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HLA-DQ

Good luck to you! Hope you find the answers you seek.

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Thanks for this. I'll have to give it more of a look into. My mom now plans to go gluten free to protect herself. What do you think about this idea?

Also is it more likely that I got the hla-dq2 or hla-dq8 ? I'm curious about the odds you'd come up with. :rolleyes:

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Thanks for this. I'll have to give it more of a look into. My mom now plans to go gluten free to protect herself. What do you think about this idea?

Also is it more likely that I got the hla-dq2 or hla-dq8 ? I'm curious about the odds you'd come up with. :rolleyes:

According to the rules of random genetic assortment, you are equally likely to have DQ2 or DQ8. That is a 50/50 chance. Of course, there have been published accounts of nonrandom genetic assortment, but I'm not sure where the field is at in terms of celiac studies. For our sake, you should assume 50/50.

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A large proportion of the general population has DQ2 and some less have DQ8, and only about 2-3% of the general population have ttg antibodies, so having these genes does not mean too much....

HLA DQ is about the risk of having celiac. The greatest risk is having a sibling with celiac and sharing the same DQ genes, tehn the risk is 40%.

Also, DQ genes are only responsible for celiac risk with 40%.

They have found 9 other genes that contribute to the risk for developing celiac.

Your mother might get better from things she did not know she had, after going gluten free.....

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The statistics say that immediate relatives of those with celiac (parents, children, or siblings) have a 1 in 22 chance of have celiac themselves. I don't know how this translates now that you know her genes but since you are diagnosed celiac your mom has AT LEAST a 1 in 22 chance of having it herself. She should get herself tested (for the antibodies) before going gluten-free, even if she has no noticeable symptoms.

http://www.celiacdisease.net/assets/pdf/CDCFactSheets%20FactsFigures%20v3.pdf

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