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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Biscuit Recipe
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freeatlast    60

OK. Here's my biscuit recipe. I retyped it with my changes and modifications.

Biscuits – photo looks like Grandma’s

You can make these vegan by using only shortening instead of butter, and your choice of dairy-less milk.

2 c. rice flour mix—I use:

¾ c. rice flour

¼ c. potato starch

2 T tapioca flour

¼ c. sweet rice flour

¼ c. almond meal

½ c. amaranth flour

1/2 t. xanthan gum

4 t. baking powder

1/2 t. baking soda

1/2 t. salt

4 T butter

2 T shortening

7/8 c. milk—I usually use coconut milk (don’t forget to SHAKE the can before opening)

2 t. apple cider vinegar (I put this in a measuring cup and then fill with milk to 7/8 line)

Extra sweet rice flour to dust your work surface

Take off your rings. You'll see why later :)

Combine the vinegar and the milk, and set aside while you are mixing the other ingredients together. Mix together the flours, xanthan gum, baking powder, baking soda, and salt with a whisk. Cut the butter into slices, on a plate, and then cut into small pieces with a sharp knife. Rub in the butter and shortening into the dry ingredients with your fingers until pea-sized. Make a well; pour in the milk and mix all together until just combined. The batter will be thick, but it should hold together in one clump. Sprinkle your work surface with sweet rice flour and turn out the dough. Fold the dough over on itself 5 or 6 times, and then shape into a mound and pat down so it’s about 1" thick. Cut out biscuits with a small glass, about 1 1/2", and arrange on an ungreased cookie sheet. Bake 12-14 minutes, until lightly browned. Makes 12 biscuits.

Notes: These little biscuits work just fine for me. I have experimented many times and have come back to the above combination. I grew up in North Carolina and my family did not make sweet biscuits, so I never add sugar. I eat these for breakfast with butter or just jelly and also make cold cut sandwiches with them using fancy mustard. They last all week in a zip lock in the refrigerator and do not get stale.

I searched the internet for a long time before finding the recipe which I have modified. If anyone knows where it came from, please let me know so I can give the author credit.

I do not know if it really NEEDS 4 t. of baking powder because they always come out exactly the same height and size after baked. If anyone knows why they need 4 t. instead of, say, 2t., please comment. Thank you 

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RiceGuy    55

If they aren't rising in the oven then I'd say it's because the baking powder is already fizzled out by the time they're put on the baking sheet. The first solution which comes to mind is to use a SAPP (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate) type baking powder. This type is heat-activated, so it doesn't begin the leavening action until the biscuits are in the oven. However, it sounds like the dough is rather stiff compared to most gluten-free risen & baked goods, so I'm not sure how much they should be expected to rise. I've had better success with drop biscuits, because the dough is softer, thus more easily risen.

Bob's Red Mill baking powder happens to be the SAPP type.

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Thank You! I lived in NC for almost 10 years prior to being gluten-free so those type of biscuits are just what I've been wanting. I think I tried two recipes and the gluten-free bisquick mix and then gave up. So many recipes have eggs in them. I NEVER put eggs in my biscuits before. The taste of the egg just throws it completely off for me. I like that you used coconut milk because that's what I like to use the most and I can use palm shortening to make these dairy and soy free. The only thing in this recipe I have not seen in my stores is Amaranth flour. I will have to find some to order, unless you can recomend a decent substitute for it. I have no clue what amaranth flour tastes like. Is it similar to buckwheat in anyway?

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freeatlast    60

Thank You! I lived in NC for almost 10 years prior to being gluten-free so those type of biscuits are just what I've been wanting. I think I tried two recipes and the gluten-free bisquick mix and then gave up. So many recipes have eggs in them. I NEVER put eggs in my biscuits before. The taste of the egg just throws it completely off for me. I like that you used coconut milk because that's what I like to use the most and I can use palm shortening to make these dairy and soy free. The only thing in this recipe I have not seen in my stores is Amaranth flour. I will have to find some to order, unless you can recomend a decent substitute for it. I have no clue what amaranth flour tastes like. Is it similar to buckwheat in anyway?

Good, I'm glad these are what you are looking for! amaranth has a distinctive flavor. I basically only use it in these biscuits and Takala's skilletbread. I get it at Whole Foods. The original recipe calls for 2 c. rice flour blend, so you can use that. That is the way I used to make them. Or, maybe try to up the almond meal. Did not like the taste of sorghum in these biscuits. I think the buckwheat would not taste good to me b/c I would think I was eating a buckwheat pancake :) Let me know what you come up with. I tried corn flour and it was fine on day two. Day one tasted like a corn-biscuit, lol.

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freeatlast    60

If they aren't rising in the oven then I'd say it's because the baking powder is already fizzled out by the time they're put on the baking sheet. The first solution which comes to mind is to use a SAPP (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate) type baking powder. This type is heat-activated, so it doesn't begin the leavening action until the biscuits are in the oven. However, it sounds like the dough is rather stiff compared to most gluten-free risen & baked goods, so I'm not sure how much they should be expected to rise. I've had better success with drop biscuits, because the dough is softer, thus more easily risen.

Bob's Red Mill baking powder happens to be the SAPP type.

Rice Guy, thanks! I will try that :)

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Good, I'm glad these are what you are looking for! amaranth has a distinctive flavor. I basically only use it in these biscuits and Takala's skilletbread. I get it at Whole Foods. The original recipe calls for 2 c. rice flour blend, so you can use that. That is the way I used to make them. Or, maybe try to up the almond meal. Did not like the taste of sorghum in these biscuits. I think the buckwheat would not taste good to me b/c I would think I was eating a buckwheat pancake :) Let me know what you come up with. I tried corn flour and it was fine on day two. Day one tasted like a corn-biscuit, lol.

Okay I'll either order some Amaranth then or use more brown rice flour. No Whole Foods here :( It may be a few weeks before I get to making these, but I'm bookmarking this post and will let you know when I try them. Thanks again!

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freeatlast    60

Okay I'll either order some Amaranth then or use more brown rice flour. No Whole Foods here :( It may be a few weeks before I get to making these, but I'm bookmarking this post and will let you know when I try them. Thanks again!

I edited the directions to try to make them more clear. Hope they work well for you. I really like them, even with all white rice mix (Bette Hagman's). Made change also from 3/4 c. milk to 7/8 c.

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freeatlast    60

Manna and anyone else who is making these biscuits, I forgot to tell you to preheat oven to 450 degrees after putting in the butter and before adding the milk.

I'm trying them today with 1/2 c. almond flour and 1/4 c. amaranth. Will let you know how that comes out :)

Edited this to say I like them BETTER by switching the measurements :)Had three with supper. Better slow down, lol.

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freeatlast    60

If they aren't rising in the oven then I'd say it's because the baking powder is already fizzled out by the time they're put on the baking sheet. The first solution which comes to mind is to use a SAPP (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate) type baking powder. This type is heat-activated, so it doesn't begin the leavening action until the biscuits are in the oven. However, it sounds like the dough is rather stiff compared to most gluten-free risen & baked goods, so I'm not sure how much they should be expected to rise. I've had better success with drop biscuits, because the dough is softer, thus more easily risen.

Bob's Red Mill baking powder happens to be the SAPP type.

Rice Guy, I bought some SAPP baking powder and a new box of baking soda, both with 2013 expiration dates, and the biscuits still didn't look any higher. Tasted GOOD, though.

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RiceGuy    55

Rice Guy, I bought some SAPP baking powder and a new box of baking soda, both with 2013 expiration dates, and the biscuits still didn't look any higher. Tasted GOOD, though.

Again, gluten-free dough stiff enough to roll out and shape like you're doing just can't rise much. With the stiffness of the dough, and the kind of flours you're using, I'd suggest using guar gum instead of xanthan (you may also find it helpful to include an equal amount of ground psyllium husk). Guar gum generally does allow for more rise under those circumstances, whereas xanthan really needs a lot more moisture (softer dough) to allow rising, as well as a largely starch-based dough. That's why gluten-free breads often start out more like a batter than a dough.

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freeatlast    60

Again, gluten-free dough stiff enough to roll out and shape like you're doing just can't rise much. With the stiffness of the dough, and the kind of flours you're using, I'd suggest using guar gum instead of xanthan (you may also find it helpful to include an equal amount of ground psyllium husk). Guar gum generally does allow for more rise under those circumstances, whereas xanthan really needs a lot more moisture (softer dough) to allow rising, as well as a largely starch-based dough. That's why gluten-free breads often start out more like a batter than a dough.

Sounds like good advice. Will do with psyllium husk. guar gum is something I have not been able to find in Indy. They didn't have at Whole Foods last I checked or Trader Joe's.

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RiceGuy    55

Sounds like good advice. Will do with psyllium husk. guar gum is something I have not been able to find in Indy. They didn't have at Whole Foods last I checked or Trader Joe's.

That's surprising. There are a number of brands of guar gum available, such as the one from NOW Foods, or the one from Source Naturals, just to name two. I'd like to think they'd order it for you. The psyllium husk powder alone won't work though. It can assists guar gum, but not replace it. I'm not aware of anything that functions quite like guar gum.

One other thing I meant to mention, is the amount of gum per cup of flour. It appears to be relatively small compared to the typical amount called for in most recipes. Usually, it is 1 tsp per cup of flour. While there are times when it can be a little less or more, biscuits has never been, in my experience, a use in which the amount could be reduced to the degree as listed in your recipe. Too little binder will mean that the bubbles produced by the leavening agents will be allowed to escape, thus little or no rise occurs.

I believe you'll find that as the dough's properties approach what is required for adequate rise, the consistency will stray from the sort which lends itself to being cut with a glass. You may, however, be able to shape it with the back of a spoon, spatula, or with your fingers, dipped in water to prevent sticking, as opposed to floured.

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freeatlast    60

One other thing I meant to mention, is the amount of gum per cup of flour. It appears to be relatively small compared to the typical amount called for in most recipes. Usually, it is 1 tsp per cup of flour. While there are times when it can be a little less or more, biscuits has never been, in my experience, a use in which the amount could be reduced to the degree as listed in your recipe. Too little binder will mean that the bubbles produced by the leavening agents will be allowed to escape, thus little or no rise occurs.

I had wondered about that. Usually, I use 1 t. per cup, as well. Next time I'll up the xanthan gum and see if that helps.

I never have the time to call around to other health food stores to see about getting guar gum. Will have to make a mission of it, I suppose :)

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