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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Sandwitches And Subs

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:huh:

i have wanted too try a really good sandwitch and a sub

does anyone have some ideas for me please and thank you

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Well....unless you live in Texas or Oregon, where Subway is running a trial on gluten-free sub sandwiches, you'll have to find a way to make your own. Against the Grain Gourmet makes a great gluten-free baguette, which can be found in the frozen-food section of healthfood-type stores (like Whole Foods, Sprouts, etc.). I can highly recommend this brand....

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Well....unless you live in Texas or Oregon, where Subway is running a trial on gluten-free sub sandwiches,

Where in Texas? I'm in TX myself and have not seen any advertising for this. I'd LOVE to know more!

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Most Boars Head meats are gluten free (and delicious). And I just discovered The Grainless Baker which makes bread that actually tastes link bread. Or throw it on an Udi's bagel. Enjoy.

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im looking for a good sub recipe to try.

just wanna try somthing new insted of tuna sandwitch and sub

:lol:

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How about meatballs and provolone or mozzarella cheese?

I really love roasted pear, arugula and blue cheese with fig jam or bacon jam (I LOVE making jams).

Roast chicken with lemon or roasted garlic aioli and sundried tomatoes.

Vegetarian with broccoli sprouts, cucumbers, tomatoes, greens, red onion, pickled hot peppers, etc.

Thinly-sliced grilled Thai beef.

Chicken or pork souvlaki or kofte with tzaziki sauce and marinated feta.

Roast lamb with mint sauce.

Thickly-sliced meatloaf.

Croatian - cevapcici with ajvar (can google recipes) but it basically grilled ground beef with an excellent roasted red pepper eggplant sauce.

Grilled Bratwurst with a good German mustard.

Grilled sausage with roasted grapes.

I also like to quickly fry rinsed capers and add to sandwiches and other dishes for salty crunch.

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jswog,

Here's an article on the Subway trial in Texas:

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/01/13/subway-tests-gluten-free-sandwiches/

Even though I don't tend to eat any grains at all, it would be a special treat to be able to eat a Subway sandwich from time to time. Hope the trial extends to California soon!

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I wouldn't touch it with a 10 foot pole. My son loves Subway, and I watched last time, imagining they were making ME a sandwich.

HECK NO!!! Gluteny hands in the meat, veggies....aaaaaacccckkkk!!!!

Unless the whole sandwich comes pre-packed (and it doesn't) there's NO WAY. There's so much cc in that joint I get nervous just giving them my money (and I'm not super sensitive)

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i have the gluten-free sub buns just no idea what to put in them besides tuna

:huh:

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One of my kids loves an "Italian" sub:

On both sides:

Pasta or pizza sauce on the bread-

Pepperoni

Ham

cover with mozzarella

Bake in the oven until cheese is melted.

You could probably look on line at a sub shop menu to get ideas.

Or

Spread flavored cream cheese on both sides ( Aloutte is one brand). This helps keep the bread from being too dry. Then load up with cold cuts, cheese, lettuce, slices of red peppers....whatever you like. You could wrap in foil and heat or eat it cold.

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