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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Karma Is A .....
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Dh has had the big d since yesterday. He said he's exhausted and he can't keep his eyes open most of the time. He has canker sores. His tremmer is awful. (he's had d for a while, just really bad since yesterday). He said he has major brain fog. When I tell him to go gluten free for 2 weeks to see if it gets better he tells me to leave him alone, and that it's not that.

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

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Marilyn R    239

My observation is that you seem very angry about him, and that you hope he has celiac disease.

I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, even though it's just an inconvenience that can be coped with. :D

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rosetapper23    236

It's quite possible that your husband DOES have celiac disease. It's not uncommon for celiacs to be attracted to other celiacs (I say this because I've observed couples at celiac conferences who found out after they were married that they each had celiac). Dr. Peter Green presented an Italian study at a Gluten Intolerance Group conference a few years ago in Seattle that demonstrated that the faces of celiacs can look quite different from those of "normal" people. It has something to do with a hormone that is supposed to kick in late in the teens, but we have trouble absorbing it, so some of our bones continue to grow. Here in the States, I began observing that many celiacs at conferences actually have very similar features (prominent cheek bones, long faces, prominent chins that curve forward, and sometimes a square jaw). Actually, most celiacs are handsome/pretty, because these features are considered quite attractive, and I believe that a number of famous actors and actresses actually have celiac. I pointed this phenomenon out to a number of the attendees at various conferences, and they were astounded to observe the same similarities.

Since studies have also shown that people tend to be attracted to people of the opposite sex who mirror their own faces, it would make perfect sense for celiacs to be attracted to celiacs. Therefore, it's not a stretch to believe that your husband is afflicted with the same malady as you....but good luck convincing him! Some people remain in denial for many years before they accept their gluten-free status. However, when he gets sick enough, he may be willing to at least try the two-week trial period. Good luck!

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kwylee    49

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

Being truly cruel would be believing that someone was suffering and choosing to taunt them anyway.

Being truly ignorant (or in denial) means they really don't believe, and therefore they don't understand. It sounds like your husband is the latter.

I know it doesn't make it much easier to bear seemingly cruel comments from him for all those years, but it would be a shame for you to endure even worse Karma because you yourself were truly cruel.

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kwylee    49

It's quite possible that your husband DOES have celiac disease. It's not uncommon for celiacs to be attracted to other celiacs (I say this because I've observed couples at celiac conferences who found out after they were married that they each had celiac). Dr. Peter Green presented an Italian study at a Gluten Intolerance Group conference a few years ago in Seattle that demonstrated that the faces of celiacs can look quite different from those of "normal" people. It has something to do with a hormone that is supposed to kick in late in the teens, but we have trouble absorbing it, so some of our bones continue to grow. Here in the States, I began observing that many celiacs at conferences actually have very similar features (prominent cheek bones, long faces, prominent chins that curve forward, and sometimes a square jaw). Actually, most celiacs are handsome/pretty, because these features are considered quite attractive, and I believe that a number of famous actors and actresses actually have celiac. I pointed this phenomenon out to a number of the attendees at the Seattle conference, and they were astounded to observe the same similarities.

Since studies have also shown that people tend to be attracted to people of the opposite sex who mirror their own faces, it would make perfect sense for celiacs to be attracted to celiacs. Therefore, it's not a stretch to believe that your husband is afflicted with the same malady as you....but good luck convincing him! Some people remain in denial for many years before they accept their gluten-free status. However, when he gets sick enough, you may be willing to at least try the two-week trial period. Good luck!

This was fascinating! Thanks for the info.

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sariesue    27

Dh has had the big d since yesterday. He said he's exhausted and he can't keep his eyes open most of the time. He has canker sores. His tremmer is awful. (he's had d for a while, just really bad since yesterday). He said he has major brain fog. When I tell him to go gluten free for 2 weeks to see if it gets better he tells me to leave him alone, and that it's not that.

It's 8:21 and hrs in bed. All the years I was in bed this early and he complained that I was "ignoring" him. Sounds like pay back?

Is he dyhrdated? When people lose too much fluid they become dehydrated and dehydration is very serious. Tremor and exhaustion are signs of dehydration as is confusion. I would be more concerned with keeping your husband hydrated than gloating over his misfourtune of being ill. There are many many different reasons he could be sick most of which are not celiac. Things like food poisoning and viruses. Sometimes when the the answer to your problem was a zebra you start to see zebras everywhere even when it's really just a horse.

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I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

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kareng    1,992

I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

I know its not the most mature or productive thing but - I would probably be glad he was experiecning it, too. :ph34r:

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sandsurfgirl    193

I know I sound like a mean bi$&@ but when you are doughted, made fun of, jokes cracked at you, and all you do is fight about what I eat, yes I become a little bitter.

Food is an issue for me. I'm obsessed before I had this issue. Now it's magnified.

I understand where you're coming from. You're so frustrated with him and his treatment of you. It would be nice if he would learn something from this experience, but if you are snarky to him he won't learn anything. It will just keep the negativity in your marriage going. Somebody has to step up and be positive and affect a positive change between you. Maybe you can somehow use this to find a way to open up the lines of communication between the two of you. You both have to be willing to budge. If your marriage keeps going like this, I am concerned for your total well being. Health isn't just about our bodies. It's about our emotions, our spiritual life and our minds. You can decide to change the toxic atmosphere between you two and maybe he will follow suit. Your kids need to have a better example than what's been happening.

Would he agree to go to counseling? It can work wonders when you're in a hard time.

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mommida    158

I'm really bitter right now. So today I do wish that every doubting doctor (you know the ones, their quotes "you're too young to have celiac. what? did you read something on the internet? You want me to test you for that "fad" disease. Maybe gluten isn't your problem. It's all in your head. Are you anorexic? Maybe you should go eat a Twinkie. It's IBS." would have a week of Celiac. Or maybe have it for the average time it takes to get diagnosed.

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We are working on this. For my birthday he went to the store and put a huge basket together full of gluten-free convience foods (cracker, pasta,cookies, brownies, candles, and a really nice bottle of wine). I was touched he thought about it.

I'm still bitter. It's still a sore subject between us. We start counseling Monday :-)

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ravenwoodglass    1,222

We are working on this. For my birthday he went to the store and put a huge basket together full of gluten-free convience foods (cracker, pasta,cookies, brownies, candles, and a really nice bottle of wine). I was touched he thought about it.

I'm still bitter. It's still a sore subject between us. We start counseling Monday :-)

Happy Birthday, that sounds like a really sweet thing for him to do.

I noticed you have a three year old that is gluten free. It is always advised that all 1st degree relatives of someone with celiac be tested. If it possible to convince him to do so he really should be tested himself. After I was finally diagnosed and recovered my kids got tested. Even though I am a blood test negative celiac both of them were positive. That prompted my ex to test and he was positive also. Celiac can have effects on our brain that make us more irritable or depressed. It made a big difference in the tension level at home when everyone was gluten free.

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Here is a big update...... We are almost done with our divorce..... He told me the "gluten drama" was the end. He found someone else, cheated on me, got caught, I kicked him out and filed for divorce.

The new guy, it looks to me like he has some gluten issues. I went back to gluten in hopes to save my marraige. I know how great I feel without it.... But as a single mom of 3 in trying to figure out how to get back to it. My new man wants to go gluten free with me

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MitziG    94

Gluten drama? What a loser. Yeah it must have really sucked for him that food made you suck. Sorry...But I AM vengeful, and there are actually quite a few people I would wish celiac on. Hope your new relationship works out. Just please stick to your guns. If you know something makes you feel bad, DON'T EAT IT!

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