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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Sarcasm About Celiac
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51 posts in this topic

There's one person I know who is actually being sarcastic about me having Celiac! This person has a relative who, according to her, seems to have every disease there is. So, when I was excited to be able to eat a co-worker's soup she made for us, this person sarcastically asked me "Is it GLUTEN FREE??" I asked her why she acts this way about it and if she didn't believe I had it...so she said it's because of her relative. I told her I wasn't her relative and that it is a serious disease! I also told her she was lucky she didn't have it!

People are so weird sometimes. I try not to talk about celiac too much...but if I ask someone if their food is safe to eat...and it is...I am going to be happy!!

I think some people think being gluten free is a fad and they relaly have no clue about what it is! I want to refer this person to this site...but I am sure she won't get it or believe any of it.

Thanks for letting me vent. Does anyone know people who act like that and think it's a joke? I am not speaking to this person much anymore...it's so upsetting. I am not trying to get attention or something...I do have to talk about it now and then!

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Yup. People are idiots. There is probably going to be worse behaviour for you to endure.

The "just a little bit" pushing gluten in your face. The devious ones that try and "test" your reaction to gluten by putting crumbs intentionally in your food. People who think it's a fad diet.

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Yeah, my Dad is like that. It really grates me. He will sarcastically say to me while I am eating something "Are you sure that's gluten free" or when I make meals for them he'll ask me if he can "have a side of gluten." Ignorant behavior, even if he is my father. I just wish he would go gluten free(I think he has celiac too), but that is a lost cause. He's happy taking all of his pills.

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I was at a wedding just over a year ago, and was offered to split a brownie. In his defense, they had no idea, but my friend said "No! No no no! She's gonna get really sick!" And his girlfriend then rolled her eyes and said to him "She has celiac" and glared at me. I have no idea why she was so freaking snarky about it.

People just don't understand how serious it really is, and if they want to be remain ignorant about it, that's their choice. It's not easy not to let them bother you, but at the same time, they're not worth getting upset over.

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I have a feeling most people who don't have celiac think people who do have celiac are just pests who are picky about their food.

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I have a feeling most people who don't have celiac think people who do have celiac are just pests who are picky about their food.

YES I 100% agree with you. I hardly even mention it to people at school unless they directly ask me. But I think I see where this illusion comes from. I see it alot on tv, they always seem to have the most geekiest kid in school always complaining that gluten doesnt sit well with him and the audience always seems to think its hilarious -_-

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I think it is a growing fad for some people and I think that's part of the reason it is not getting the proper view from some, it's kind of like a "yeah, yeah, yeah whatever" attitude, like it is something that's going to pass, like we have a choice. In our case it is not about a matter of choice and that's what they are clueless about.

I was at dinner the other night with friends and I have learned to ask questions regardless. I am not the type who likes all the attention drawn to myself but I am doing everything to prevent from getting sick again. After the waiter left the table, one of my friends said, "Oh that's right I forgot." The other asked me how it was going for me. I could have taken that several different ways but I decided that she meant the best for me and that was the end of the conversation about gluten. This friend happens to have a very sensative stomach, can't eat this and that but I'll keep my mouth shut in this case.

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My dad, whenever we're out at restaurants and he orders after my gluten-free order, will tell the server, "and give me all of her gluten" or "and plenty of gluten for me please" or something like that. But this is the same dad who carefully wraps my food on the grill in foil and remembers to use separate plates and forks to handle it and makes sure not a single drop of grease from soy-filled sausages ends up in it. I think in this case what he's doing is making sure the server knows that I'm the only gluten-free one? idk. He's silly. He did get himself tested and was negative.

I have another friend who talks about bread like every time I talk to him, and says things like, "I need gluten" and when I say why "because it's yummy." and so on. Then when I make some comment about gluten or bread being "evil," HE gets offended. yeah.

whatevs. Best to just let it roll offa ya.

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i know i shouldn't be, but i'm surprised that people don't read. it seems that those who are determined to believe that having gluten intolerance or celiac is a fad or some form of hypochondria , they have not and/or will not educate themselves about it. frustrating!

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One of my roommates has celiac in her family and is likely celiac herself, but she gives me the most trouble of any of my friends. She talks about going gluten-free like you would about not drinking soda or avoiding sweets. Every time I pass up a treat offered by someone who forgets I can't eat it, this roomie says something like, "What, are you scared? It's just a little." For her if the majority of the ingredients are gluten-free ("Barley's only one of the 20 ingredients") then I'm just being picky. I didn't find out until just last month that the celiacs in her family are the type who think the pain and illness is "worth a bite or two".

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One of my roommates has celiac in her family and is likely celiac herself, but she gives me the most trouble of any of my friends. She talks about going gluten-free like you would about not drinking soda or avoiding sweets. Every time I pass up a treat offered by someone who forgets I can't eat it, this roomie says something like, "What, are you scared? It's just a little." For her if the majority of the ingredients are gluten-free ("Barley's only one of the 20 ingredients") then I'm just being picky. I didn't find out until just last month that the celiacs in her family are the type who think the pain and illness is "worth a bite or two".

You'll notice this isn't about you, it's about HER.

I really think that's what is behind a majority of these sarcastic reactions.

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You'll notice this isn't about you, it's about HER.

I really think that's what is behind a majority of these sarcastic reactions.

Prickly, you are so right about this and that's what we have to keep in mind!

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I have a cousin who likes to call me a freak because of my wheat allergy. I wonder if she would call a person with a cat or dog allergy a freak??? All other allegies are so readily accepted without question or scrutiny. But wheat is a whole different matter. It is totally questioned and scrutinized. Sadly, all I have to do is whip out my epi-pens and they become (scared)believers. Scared because I teach them how to use my epi-pen "just in case" and it SCARES the crap out of them! However, I want the people around me to know how to use it, it is my best defense against death by anaphylactic shock.

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I offer folks like this (those that I insist eat soy or those that roll their eyes) the

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I offer folks like this (those that I insist eat soy or those that roll their eyes) the

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Please take pictures when someone takes you up on this. . And oh, I hope they wear white clothing and have a white couch!

And they NOT allowed to plug their noses!!!!! :P

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wow. that was really kind of gross. funny, but gross.

I like this topic. It points out that we all have a job to raise awareness. Even if its just to our closest friends and family.

I'll happily take the ridicule from friends and coworkers and try to shake it off if it means that I won't get poisoned in the process. I won't lie and say it doesn't bother me at times. I just try not to wear it like a cross or burden.

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wow. that was really kind of gross. funny, but gross.

I like this topic. It points out that we all have a job to raise awareness. Even if its just to our closest friends and family.

I'll happily take the ridicule from friends and coworkers and try to shake it off if it means that I won't get poisoned in the process. I won't lie and say it doesn't bother me at times. I just try not to wear it like a cross or burden.

So true. I take every opportunity to educate people on the use of an Epi-Pen. I think that maybe somewhere, someday down the line, they might come across a person who is having a reaction, and will remember what I taught them and act accordingly. Maybe it will save a life someday....Awareness and education are crucial. :)

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My dad, whenever we're out at restaurants and he orders after my gluten-free order, will tell the server, "and give me all of her gluten" or "and plenty of gluten for me please" or something like that. But this is the same dad who carefully wraps my food on the grill in foil and remembers to use separate plates and forks to handle it and makes sure not a single drop of grease from soy-filled sausages ends up in it. I think in this case what he's doing is making sure the server knows that I'm the only gluten-free one? idk. He's silly. He did get himself tested and was negative.

My husband does that. But, like your dad, he's the one who's the first to speak up to the server about things needing to be gluten free and how to do it. He's also always very conscious of cc at home. He is most definately my biggest supporter anywhere, but he is the type of person to always be joking around. He does not do it in a way that is in any way disrespectful. Maybe it's just to lighten the mood a bit after such an in-dept conversation about how to make sure mine is gluten free. IDK, but I don't get offended at all. I just roll my eyes (but then I do that a lot with him...).

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I offer folks like this (those that I insist eat soy or those that roll their eyes) the

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I've been gluten-free for over 8 years now and I've reached a point where I just refuse to talk to people about it (unless someone comes to me wanting help with a gluten-free dietary issue). I don't feel that talking about it for the first 8 years raised any awareness. It just made my life more difficult and caused a lot of rude questions and comments that I don't feel like listening to anymore.

I'm in a new city with new friends, so if it starts to come up I just tell people (including friends whom I see regularly) that I have a medical condition that restricts my diet and I'm not comfortable talking about it. I also explicitly specify that my issue is not an eating disorder. To that people say, "Oh I understand," and drop the issue. It's really quite easy. I should mention this new rule of mine only applies when I'm in the US, and not other places where people have much different cultural attitudes toward food and eating.

I know other people might have different views of our obligation to raise awareness, but I can raise awareness in other ways, and this is really working for me so far. I should also mention I don't ever, ever, ever want or expect other people to provide me with food in any sort of context (I can understand it might be necessary to mention gluten in a situation where you would). Just a new approach I thought I'd share, in case others want to try it...

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I have a cousin who likes to call me a freak because of my wheat allergy. I wonder if she would call a person with a cat or dog allergy a freak??? All other allegies are so readily accepted without question or scrutiny. But wheat is a whole different matter. It is totally questioned and scrutinized. Sadly, all I have to do is whip out my epi-pens and they become (scared)believers. Scared because I teach them how to use my epi-pen "just in case" and it SCARES the crap out of them! However, I want the people around me to know how to use it, it is my best defense against death by anaphylactic shock.

I really don't understand why people can't look at it like other serious allergies. Peanuts get a lot of attention; everyone instantly puts away anything containing peanuts with little or no complaint when asked to by someone with a serious allergy. Peanut, animal, medication-allergies rarely get the eye roll, so why gluten?

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I offer folks like this (those that I insist eat soy or those that roll their eyes) the

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There are rude people everywhere unfortunately. I really don't talk much about eating gluten free to people, with the exception of family and close friends. I just don't feel like explaining it or subjecting myself to any of that. There have been times that I have been offered cookies or some other gluteny item, and I just say, no thanks. No explanation needed, nobody asked me why not? I bet that the people that were rude to you about gluten are probably rude to others about different things, they are just rude in general.

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On the other hand, you get situations like I had the other day. There's an older gentleman at work who's old school Italian who commented that I looked great. And I said, yeah, well, it's cause I finally have a handle on my celiac. He started talking about his neuropathy, his balance issues, his headaches, his digestive problems. He's been to a dozen neuros and gastros, and no one has EVER brought up celiac or GI. So I gave him blood test refs and book recs and a few recipes. He said he wished I was his doctor. Worth a million sarcastic comments. Felt like I saved a life. =D

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