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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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You make a good point..Ha! well, you got it from SOMEONE, right? :)

True! Though to be honest, I don't really care who I got it from. My mom felt horribly guilty after I was diagnosed but I tell her that I'm lucky to have such kind loving parents. I'd rather have bad genes and good parents, than good genes and bad parents!

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True! Though to be honest, I don't really care who I got it from. My mom felt horribly guilty after I was diagnosed but I tell her that I'm lucky to have such kind loving parents. I'd rather have bad genes and good parents, than good genes and bad parents!

Well said!--and I agree with you completely. :D

After my DX, we did the genetic testing and my Mom felt just as bad as yours.

She went gluten-free 3 months after I did and feels great. :)

I will take longer. :rolleyes:

We feel worse for my Dad, who died in 2008 from many symptoms which point to unDxed celiac. If we only knew...

ah well. We cannot go backward, only forward--and like you, I was blessed with loving, funny and exceptionally giving parents. :)

Lucky us! ;)

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I am an American mutt. Mom's side was Welsh, Irish and English and Dad was German, Dutch and ?. Oddly enough I carry a double copy of a Celiac associated gene that is from either the Middle East or Asia and is uncommon in the US caucasian population. I got one copy from each parent. Forever a mystery at this point.

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When I started this thread I thought I may have got one or two replies. Never expected the postings that have resulted. I have been fascinated to read people roots and genetic lineage.

My original youtube links were to try and convey the peculiarities of Scottish heritage (which can be very different from rest of UK). I chose them because they depicted a huge historial time for Scotland, and portrayed how Scot's love to have a sing -song.

I would be interested in people's postings regarding this insight into their culture. From this side of the pond, I imagine that there's differences between, for example, New York, small town America, San francisco, Nashville etc.

Try and find something which summons up what makes the difference between where you live.

I've got lots up my sleeve about being Scottish !!!!

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Differences between places in the US? Well, I have lived in Connecticut on the East Coast, San Diego on the West Coast, and now I'm in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the middle of the country.

When I moved from Connecticut to San Diego it was culture shock. The East Coast at that time was more conservative. (This was in the early 70's.) San Diego was more liberal, and so much more fast paced. In Conn. at that time, everything closed by 9PM. In San Diego, everything was open 24 hours.

Now, I'm in a tiny little town that rolls up the sidewalks at 6PM, even on the weekends. Our convenience store has now started staying open 24 hours. (They until just recently, closed at ten.) No one locks their doors here. In the winter, when you go to the grocery store, all of the cars in the parking lot are still running and unlocked. Our biggest crimes are usually DUI's and an occasional domestic disturbence. When any member of the community has a problem, the whole town turns out to help them.

I can't buy white cheddar cheese here. I can't get Starbucks ice cream here. I can't get Cape Cod chips here. The produce is starting to rot before they even unload it from the truck, and although we grow the best beef in the world, we can't get it at our grocery store. Most of the meats they carry come from Mexico. There is absolutely no seafood.

And even on my restricted diet, it is well worth putting up with the lack of amenities. I feel SAFE here. I feel like I'm part of everyone's family here. It's kind of like going back to the 1950's. I love it so much I will never leave. (If any of my friends from East or West want to see me, they have to come here.)

Oh, and one more thing. I have traveled to almost every state in the union, and the Black Hills DEFINITELY has the most beautiful scenery I've ever encountered.

I invite ALL of you to take a vacation here next summer. Come see what I'm talking about - but you'd better bring your own food! And bring me some while you're at it! :lol:

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When I started this thread I thought I may have got one or two replies. Never expected the postings that have resulted. I have been fascinated to read people roots and genetic lineage.

My original youtube links were to try and convey the peculiarities of Scottish heritage (which can be very different from rest of UK). I chose them because they depicted a huge historial time for Scotland, and portrayed how Scot's love to have a sing -song.

I would be interested in people's postings regarding this insight into their culture. From this side of the pond, I imagine that there's differences between, for example, New York, small town America, San francisco, Nashville etc.

Try and find something which summons up what makes the difference between where you live.

I've got lots up my sleeve about being Scottish !!!!

Funny. Where you live and where you're from seems to be very different for a lot of people I know.

I'm FROM the southern U.S. I'm IN the southwest. And man oh man are they different!

I've spent the bulk of my adult life searching for buttercream icing (apparently they stop making it west of Ft. Worth), wondering why everyone is obsessed with celebrities but not what their neighbors are up to (because in the south, honey, they ALL want to know your business)....

I love the southwest because there aren't many social restrictions, on the other hand I hate the lack of "civilization" and the traditions I grew up with. Typical American - always wanting something I don't have right now.

Around here, Thanksgiving means it has finally cooled off...and you can open the windows and let the house air out. Rarely are turkeys fried around here, but there are some yummy cranberry and turkey tamales! At Christmas you're as likely to see a wreath of chiles on the door as balsam (the balsam will be fake, the chiles won't), and Santa is probably sitting next to a Saguaro and is bilingual.

We hibernate from May til the monsoon - coming out when it rains. Back in around Sept. till it cools off around Halloween. We party outside from Nov. through April, and quite likely have a prickly pear margarita in hand.

How's that?

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I live in the Kansas City area (Mid-America). I live on the Kansas side. Here most people have yards, even apartment complexes have playgounds, pools, places for kids to ride bikes. We have lots of stuff for kids. Beautiful soccer, baseball & football facilities paid for with taxes. Lots of participation in organized sports. Excellant schools with excellant students. The kind of High Schools where a 3.7 GPA doesn't put you in the top 20% of your class. A big percentage attend religious services.

Today was a nice day, so lots of yard work & neighbors putting up Christmas lights. My 15 yr old & his dad did a service project then went camping with Boy Scouts. This is the Thanksgiving campout so they eat well!

Is that the kind of thing you were thinking of? We don't really have any local traditions on a big scale. We have a shopping area that is known for its Xmas light displays.

Country Club Plaza Christmas Lights - My Most Viewed Photo

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We don't do Thanksgiving down under, it's just going on summer, but we do do a mid-winter Christmas in June or July (you can have it whenever you want to :D ) where we can serve all the traditional northern Thanksgiving/Christmas foods - sometimes even with Santa making an appearance.

By Christmas summer is (should be) in full swing, so it's camping at the bach/crib, barbecues at the beach, hams, salads and seafood, pavlovas and fruit salad, and the whole country closes down from Dec. 24 through about January 7. If you need a plumber, forget it - make a swimming pool :D We have hundreds of private campgrounds which are jampacked with every kind of tent, home-made camper or caravan, camping vans (filled with foreign tourists who drive on the wrong side of the road), motorhomes , egads I'm starting to feel the need for elbow room :lol: Those who no longer have kids at home do not dream of taking vacation (holiday) at this time of year unless it is to a foreign country - they wait until February/March when school has gone back and the rain does not leak into your tent (so often) if you are still young enough to enjoy tenting :P Give me a good country inn in some remote location with a good chef , some good books, good bush walks where there are no sandflies (anyone who has been here will know why I say that :ph34r:) and I'm a happy camper.

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I grew up in the Boston, Massachusetts area. My neighborhood was an immigrant melting pot and "clan-ish"...everyone knew everyone. Mrs. Jones would make an extra "P B and J sammy" when she made the ones for her own 5 kids if you were playing on the street when she called them inside AND she was also "allowed" to yell at you if you were misbehaving. :lol: There were no worries about children being safe back then because the closest neighbor knew "your business". This could be both good and bad. :rolleyes: The "fruit and veggie" guy came around with a truck once a week and he yelled "Bananas, tomatoes, potatoes, Stawwwwwberries", the milk was still delivered in glass bottles, and Dairy Dan was the ice cream truck that came every summer night, summoning the kids with the jingle we all recognized.

I let myself in after school with my own key from age 6 up and I knew if I needed anything, Mrs. Wolfe next door or my Aunt a few doors down would come to my rescue. Our low-to-middle class neighborhood included people of all cultures and races and I did really not know "color" or "race". We were all just "kids". (Poverty is a great equalizer.) Sundays included afternoon family dinners with my immigrant grandparents and dozens of cousins and aunts and uncles. It was a fun childhood and typical of that era and location in the city.

Not sure if any of these "traditions" exist anymore. :(

I rode my bike everywhere and took the subway at age 8 by myself. We walked to school. No school buses. Sunday outings were to the beach: The North Shore, New Hampshire or Cape Cod. During the week, we busied ourselves at the city pool where I learned to swim like a fish. I went to dancing school and dreamed of being a Radio City Hall Rockette. One lucky summer, I attended Girl Scout camp in the New Hampshire White Mountains for 2 weeks and I thought I had gone to heaven. I LOVED the fresh air, the trees, the mountains, lakes, the night sky so clear--- and the animals. I told my parents: "One day, I will live where it is quiet and clean and I can lay under the stars and watch the birds and animals play."

We had so much available to us in terms of rich New England history.

It was traditional for Bostonians to visit Plymouth Rock, Thoreau's Walden Pond, Salem Village-famous for the Witch trials--Cape Cod, Sturbridge Village, Old Ironsides, cheer for the Red Sox, Celtics, Bruins and Patriots and of course, walk the Freedom Trail.

Christmas meant a tree purchased from the local lot. I do not know how "Santa" managed to bring so many gifts to 3 kids whose parents worked long hours and had no "extras", but it was always magical! :)

Later, I had the incredible joy of teaching college students from all over the world (and probably learned more from them than they ever learned from me.)

I have lived in New York State for the last 28 years and the concept of the close-knit American neighborhood seems to have disappeared. Maybe it still exists in the suburbs? I can get to New York City in 3 hours and enjoy the nightlife, plays, museums and restaurants when I need a "city fix". I live in the countryside now -on a dirt road--and my closest neighbor is miles away. We enjoy the quiet, the clear night skies, the trees, fresh air and plenty of wildlife.

I got my wish. I guess some would call that realizing "the American Dream"? :)

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I am a WASP (white, anglo-saxon protestant) and from the deep South (Mississippi) which makes me a member of the only group in America that it is still acceptable to make fun of. Somehow, we don't care.

The area that I live in is an historic district and really is like a small town. We know our neighbors and can safely walk around at night.

This is where Southern Hospitality originated. Strangers are greeted and treated like frends.

I want to emphasize that the racial troubles that we are so famous for are greatly exaggerated. I don't even know anyone that I would think is a racist. There is no denying our trobled past, but we have come a very long way.

I have to brag here. Our food is the very best. Fried chicken, fresh garden vegetables,barbeque, all manner of sweets. Hooray for Southern cooking!

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Differences between places in the US? Well, I have lived in Connecticut on the East Coast, San Diego on the West Coast, and now I'm in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the middle of the country.

When I moved from Connecticut to San Diego it was culture shock. The East Coast at that time was more conservative. (This was in the early 70's.) San Diego was more liberal, and so much more fast paced. In Conn. at that time, everything closed by 9PM. In San Diego, everything was open 24 hours.

Now, I'm in a tiny little town that rolls up the sidewalks at 6PM, even on the weekends. Our convenience store has now started staying open 24 hours. (They until just recently, closed at ten.) No one locks their doors here. In the winter, when you go to the grocery store, all of the cars in the parking lot are still running and unlocked. Our biggest crimes are usually DUI's and an occasional domestic disturbence. When any member of the community has a problem, the whole town turns out to help them.

I can't buy white cheddar cheese here. I can't get Starbucks ice cream here. I can't get Cape Cod chips here. The produce is starting to rot before they even unload it from the truck, and although we grow the best beef in the world, we can't get it at our grocery store. Most of the meats they carry come from Mexico. There is absolutely no seafood.

And even on my restricted diet, it is well worth putting up with the lack of amenities. I feel SAFE here. I feel like I'm part of everyone's family here. It's kind of like going back to the 1950's. I love it so much I will never leave. (If any of my friends from East or West want to see me, they have to come here.)

Oh, and one more thing. I have traveled to almost every state in the union, and the Black Hills DEFINITELY has the most beautiful scenery I've ever encountered.

I invite ALL of you to take a vacation here next summer. Come see what I'm talking about - but you'd better bring your own food! And bring me some while you're at it! :lol:

I got married and moved from the Seattle area to Cape Cod in the 90's. I felt totally out of place. Like a hippie. I couldn't believe the jobs that were available (not many) and what you were expected to do for so little money. Or the questions that were asked on the job applications. Like about your religion or what organizations you belonged to.

Stuff like that wouldn't be allowed here at all! Then when I couldn't get a good job I was told it was because of my Italian name. I was told if I changed it to my maiden name, Dow, I would get a job instantly.

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Hi Lisa,

sweet-animated-gif-003.gif

Smiley_Blowing_Kiss.gif

Its Diddl!!! (I'm referring to the mouse, for the unitiated :) )

I spent some time in Germany in high school and loved this cartoon character!

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I've really enjoyted reading all the responses. I live in a small market town in Scotland and we have two claims to fame. Firstly it was in Lanark that William Wallace first raised his sword in his fight for Scottish freedom. Secondly, we have the oldest celebration in Scotland, called Lanimers. Click on this link to find out all about. It really is worth a read.

http://www.lanarklanimers.co.uk/guide_to_lanimers.asp

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I am Canadian but my ancestors are mainly from Germany (I have more family in Germany than here in Canada) and Scotland and England. However, I FEEL Croatian! :D

My Mom has an absolutely fascinating book that traces her family back to around 1100 - all handmade with locks of hair, old sketches, photographs, caligraphy - one of her relatives was a servant to Queen Anne in London. Wish I could have met her! Anyway, this book would be priceless. It is falling apart and is made of very old leather.

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My family history on fathers' side has been researched by a cousin I didn't know I had. I was researching our genealogy and then I found her. Her grandfather was a brother to mine.

As far as I know our family name will end shortly. My grandfather had 2 sons and 2 daughters, my dad got 2 daughters and my uncle is gay so no kids there. On my grandfathers' brothers' side there is only 1 person to pass it on but I haven't heard of him having a son yet. It would be a shame if the name died out, it's quite rare. As far as I know there are only 13 people in my country with that name, all direct family. In Germany there are more, but it's still rare.

My fathers' lineage can be traced to a very small area in the south of the Netherlands, at the border of Germany and the Netherlands. People from our name have been living in this contested area since approx. 1600. Before that time the name appeared in nothern Germany, at the border with Denmark.

On my mothers' side there is a small part of nobility, her fathers' name shows a connection to a duchy in the south of the Netherlands. Her mother is descended from French hugenots who fled the country because of their religious beliefs and found a safe haven here in the Netherlands.

Funny thing: nobody can say they're truly Dutch: 5 centuries ago large parts of the country were still under water. Dutch people have a very mixed ancestry: Frisians, Francs and Saxons. Some people from the south also have a little Spanish blood because the Netherlands have been Spanish territory for a time.

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the Netherlands has such a fascinating history. I had no idea!! I may have missed it in my tired and itchy state but can you let us know your family name?

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the Netherlands has such a fascinating history. I had no idea!! I may have missed it in my tired and itchy state but can you let us know your family name?

Well, we've heard all about it at school but I never found it really interesting until lately. At school it was all about remembering years and names, while I was more interested in the way society was influenced.

There's a lot of discussion going on about Dutch culture lately, because some people feel that immigrants are doing damage to that culture. In the meantime they forget that nearly all Dutch are partly foreign and that the Netherlands have a long and proud history of being a safe haven for political and ethnical refugees. They brought great wealth and diversity with them and that created our culture.

If people don't mind I'd rather not share my name for privacy reasons. We are talking about health issues here on this forum and I'm trying to rebuild my career after recovering.

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Hmmm....from where to start??? I am a mix of Greek/Spanish/German and Nordic decent...but since i was born and rased in Greece i prefer to say im Greek(so many countries in a mixer uhhh if a say all of them ...) My mother is from Greece(Cyprus) her father , Spanish(Basque)German(somewhere in the west i dont remember) and Greek(her mother was abopted by Greek parends )My father is from Greece( Athens) his father,his mother mixe of Greek ,German and Nordic decent..

Most people quess im Eastern European (mostly Russian)it ..lol :rolleyes:

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I don't know much about my mother's family. Her mom died before I was old enough to learn anything and her father was adopted, I never met him. My dad's family we've traced back several hundred years to Ireland and Germany. My first ancestors came to America (Philadelphia) shortly before the American Revolution. I can proudly say that I come from a family that has bled for our freedoms, more than anything that is a part of my heritage that I hold dear. The tradition has held strong and several members of every generation have joined the military.

I grew up in Pennsylvania in an area where "Pennsylvania Dutch" traditions and foods are such an integral part of everyone's lives that you don't even think about it. We also had many Amish neighbors who still speak what used to be German but has evolved a bit since they've been over the pond for so long. I didn't realize how much of what I grew up with is not mainstream in America until I left that area. Trying to find a perogi in Utah is slightly more difficult than finding a needle in a haystack. No one here seems to know how to make sauerkraut, which I kind of just assumed everyone knew how to do.

I lived outside of a small town on a farm and our family was pretty self-sufficient. I didn't have much cause to ever participate much in a lot of the local culture other than what was part of the farming community. Most of the community activities I remember took place at churches and were a variety of huge get-togethers with enough food for an army.

I don't know a whole lot about Utah culture to be perfectly honest. Much of the time I've been here I've been far too sick to participate in much. Also, as a childless couple my husband and I don't really fit in with any other married couples around our age so we don't have the desire to socialize much. We do have a pretty significant population of latino immigrants in my area, so they bring much of their cultures to my area of Utah.

I have to say it is quite fascinating to read through all of the posts here.

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i am american. i was born in new jersey but moved to east tennessee. i am comfortable either place, but i love my new home and i will live here until the good Lord takes me home. my paternal grandmother was full-blooded hungarian. my paternal grandfather was half mohegan <(sp) indian and half english. my maternal grandfather was english and irish/scottish <he was a foster child so that was never too clear) and my maternal grandmother was a colby, a very old english family who settled in massachusetts back in the day. they have traced our roots clear back to good king charlemagne. i remind my husband that i am of royal blood all the time. sometimes it even works ;) other times he just threatens to cut off that little finger where all the royal blood is..... :D

my hungarian grandmother had alot of influence on my traditions and menu choices - you know the old woman who got married in the depression, she spits on a napkin to clean your face, crashes cheeks instead of kissing, knows how to make head cheese, (or a 'salve' omgosh - salves! lols) - stuffed cabbage, crepes, goulash, etc.... also, macaroni with ketchup sprinkled with breadcrumbs <yuk but i bet this will be my dad's last meal request when the day comes!

this is an awesome thread - thank you :)

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Thank you to everyone who has taken part in and enjoyed this thread. I'm really enjoying reading all the replies and it's so nice to have such a great response to my thread. :)

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Right now, here at our house in Kansas City, its FIRST Robotics season. From last Saturday until sometime in April when the championships are, life revolves around building the robot, feeding the kids and mentors who are building the robot, feeding the robot, chasing around town trying to find some odd part then finding out what they really need is the suction cups on cheap bathmats from Walmart not the $45 part I drove an hour to get, etc. It keeps the Dad's out of trouble. ;)

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So many things explained it makes you experience a range of emotions. Grateful: Relief and gratefulness someone finally agreed to send you to someone to test you. She saw past the other diagnosis' and the albatross IBS diagnosis. All the ages and stages of symptoms are explained they all fit. Everyone of them! Someone else also has had them. You are not alone. Read the forum-you fit like a glove. Anger: Anger for the way you have been treated by the medical community, family, some ex boyfriends, friends and coworkers. Anger for the length of time you endured this. Hurt: Hurt for the times people said unkind things to you when you were symptomatic or flaring . you are experiencing symptoms that change your body people are rude to congratulate you on a "pregnancy" you didn't announce or ask why you are not slim when you hardly eat. you are not over emotional -  you are suffering from neuro symptoms, you are not making this up for attention Sad & Guilty: Can I work again? Do I want to work again? What kind of work can I do now? Can I find a job and work PT from home? You didn't envision this your husband having to be sole bread winner now what? I am overwhelmed thinking about this-stop? You now have closure and know how and why you lost your first pregnancy. You now know why you were high risk, complications,  with your children in Pregnancy & Delivery that they couldn't be explained back then It explains why in pregnancy you lost weight and why your morning sickness was extreme and seemed to last longer than anyone you knew,  that your Puppp rash was likely misdiagnosed DH It is not your fault none of it. Please forgive yourself for what you did not know. Your children forgive you. Believe them when they say its not your fault. You can cry, but you can no longer blame yourself. You are a good mother just one with an illness your children will learn to accept. Withdrawn: Why are you withdrawing from your husband? 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Don't tell me I don't look well. I will snap, I don't want to snap, I am irritable ,and don't feel well. Just keep giving off the unapproachable vibe keep them away.  Am I strong enough to do this? Acceptance: Calm down the inflammation, lack of nutrients, and GI damage is messing with your head. Your husband said for better for worse. Your kids have no choice you are their mother and you are a good mom -you have always been, always will be even on your worst day. If they get this they will be ok. You are strong enough to do this you are just ill and most importantly you must remain here in case they get this so you can guide them and be there for them. Got it? Go on the forum you are not alone it will be ok. You will get this lion back in the cage and manage it. It will be ok. If you can't travel in retirement one day you will find other hobbies or things to occupy your time. He's not going to leave you over this. If he does it will be ok. You'll manage-you always do. You have an answer, you knew it was coming, keep reading, learning, seeking support, and one day it will all work out. You will process all this and will be at peace-until then keep going and above all AVOID GLUTEN!    
    • I know for certain gastritis  is one of the main reasons I had the scope. That and my EOE symptoms . If it wasn’t for those I would have never been diagnosed 
    • Sometimes when those chilly winds begin to blow, and the temperatures fall, the days get visibly shorter, what we need and what we want is comfort food. Well, look no further than this simple, easy twist on scalloped potatoes. A little ham and a bit of cheese work wonders to turn that old favorite into a meal all its own. View the full article
    • Good luck with the holistic doc. I saw a naturopath for months who set me on a good path until I couldn't afford all the supplements anymore. Be careful with that. I found nothing helped me more than decent whole food and good quality vitamins. And of course sleep and lots of water!
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