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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Blood Type And Celiac
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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

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It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet, and they only ate meat, vegetables, seeds & some roots, but I wasn't surprised to read that gluten intolerance is common across all blood types, and I think that's because the introduction of grain into our diets is relatively new by evolution standards. Perhaps if modern science researched the makeup of someone who is truly NOT intolerant to gluten in the least, they may be able to discern much more than blood type as the reason. But first they'd have to find someone like that - I wonder if they could.

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It's an interesting thought since type O is the original bloodtype on the planet,

Not true:

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/esp_ciencia_life24.htm

Given the above facts, blood types AB and O seem to be a combination of A+A, A+B or B+B (AB as exclusive and O as inclusive) - whereas A and B themselves appear to be separate original groups. Only if the father and mother are "A AND B" or "B AND A" blood type can the child then be born with any of the human blood groups A, B, AB or O. This negates current theory that O is the original blood type, especially since the man-apes have little or no O blood type and no AB blood type at all.

A and B are very likely the originals. Chimp + Gorilla? The spot at which the territories of the chimps and gorillas meet is also the region of the oldest human skulls in Africa

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That's excellent info, thanks!

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The blood type theory has been proposed and is bunk.

richard

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I knew it all along!!! I am chimpanzee :D , hub is GORILLA!!

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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

It is almost certainly a coincidence, but the question is certainly a valid one. Type O blood is the most common blood type, therefore a sample of the population will return a larger number of celiac patients with type O blood, a slightly smaller number with type A and much smaller numbers of the other types. Most people with celiac also have dark hair. It is a natural and wholly expected human tendency to seek out patterns. Once we think we see a pattern we need to verify it. The scientific method is an entirely accessible system designed to control for bias and to filter valid patterns from invalid ones.

This issue of blood types and digestive traits was promoted by a naturopath by the name of Peter J. D'Adamo. (D'Adamo, Peter J, and Catherine Whitney 4 Blood Types, 4 Diets: Eat Right 4/For Your Type, New York: Putnam and Sons. 1996. 392pp). This book is, in my mind, a great example of unverified pattern seeking. Nowhere in the entire text does he cite any valid, repeatable research supporting his claims, many of which are quite significant. One claim that caused me great concern was when he stated quite authoritatively that people with type O blood are prone to hyperthyroidism (ibid. p 53). There is absolutely no evidence to support this claim. It is true, however that a larger number of people with type O blood will have hyperthyroidism because there are more people with type O blood. The entire book is basically an untested hypothesis published as definitive science. While some may claim it is possible he is right, it is also possible he is quite wrong. Without evidence there is nothing there but an idea that needs validation.

A good scientist uses his/her intuition to ask good questions, but relies on the rigors of the scientific method to establish if his questions lead to valid answers or not. D'Adamo cuts past the testing and jumps to certitude without any facts to back up his claims. Anecdotes (which he seems to rely on the most for his "proof") are not valid because they represent cases he has selected to prove his point, not randomly sampled subjects compared to a cohort of control subjects.

We must not leave science only to the scientists. Each one of us must take the responsibility to be a critical thinker and consumer and promoter of verifiable and accurate information. This is especially important for those of us who need good, reliable information to protect ourselves from the dangers of exposure to gluten and other toxins (to us). While D'Adamo's book has a disclaimer stating that the authors claim no liability for their recommendations, and insist the book be used as a source of "information to help the reader cooperate with physicians and health care providers..." (Ibid p. IX). However. like the "nutritional supplements" sold in health food stores and pharmacies, the fine print about lack of scientific evidence is decidedly overshadowed by the large print that makes clear and definitive medical claims.

Sorry for the wordy and probably overly pedantic response. Please do not take this as a criticism of you. It is always good to ask questions.

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Hi I have been wondering if specific blood type is more prone to Celiac than others? I am O- and have had conversation with several people with Celiac and amazingly most of them were O- coincidence?

Given that type O is the most common in the US, it's probably coincidence. :)

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