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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Marathon Training
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21 posts in this topic

Hi All,

I am new to the forum, and have been a Celiac for the past 4 years, with recently being diagnosed with having corn and yeast allergies and lactose intolerance. My mother was also diagnosed with the Celiac Disease 40 years ago, so it was easy for me to diagnose when I saw the symptoms.

I cycle every morning for about 40 minutes and run for 3-4 miles each day. I am looking to commence training to hopefully run the New York Marathon next November. So I wondered if anyone on the forum has completed a marathon, and if so are there any Celiac energy foods or drinks you would recommend to boost energy. Currently without running or cycling long periods, on the weekends I am totally wiped. I take a vegetarian multi-vitamin which really helps with my energy level, but realize with longer runs I may be so tired it may impact my training. With so many allergies, thankfully I am big into fruit, veg etc, so I indulge with these on a daily basis.

Anyhow,any feedback from folks having gone down this road would be appreciated.

thanks,

Zach

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Hi All,

I am new to the forum, and have been a Celiac for the past 4 years, with recently being diagnosed with having corn and yeast allergies and lactose intolerance. My mother was also diagnosed with the Celiac Disease 40 years ago, so it was easy for me to diagnose when I saw the symptoms.

I cycle every morning for about 40 minutes and run for 3-4 miles each day. I am looking to commence training to hopefully run the New York Marathon next November. So I wondered if anyone on the forum has completed a marathon, and if so are there any Celiac energy foods or drinks you would recommend to boost energy. Currently without running or cycling long periods, on the weekends I am totally wiped. I take a vegetarian multi-vitamin which really helps with my energy level, but realize with longer runs I may be so tired it may impact my training. With so many allergies, thankfully I am big into fruit, veg etc, so I indulge with these on a daily basis.

Anyhow,any feedback from folks having gone down this road would be appreciated.

thanks,

Zach

I am planning on running a half marathon in May and have also been looking for different foods to boost energy.

One protien bar I really really like is Zing Bars. They are gluten free, dairy free and soy free. They are expesive about 31 dollars for a box of 12 but they are delicious and give me tons of energy.

Check them out here

http://www.zingbars.com/

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Sarah,

Thanks for the response. I had a look at those after you posted, and they look like they fit the bill. For long distance running, do you run 5-6 days a week or 2-3 days? if so what are your energy levels like when you eat the Zings? also what sort of distance do you run?

thanks,

Zach

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Sarah,

Thanks for the response. I had a look at those after you posted, and they look like they fit the bill. For long distance running, do you run 5-6 days a week or 2-3 days? if so what are your energy levels like when you eat the Zings? also what sort of distance do you run?

thanks,

Zach

School has been kind of crazy so I'm trying to get back into my normal running routine. I usually run about 4 to 5 times a week, but lately its been about 2 to 3.

I feel great when I eat one of the Zing bars.It give me a ton of energy. I don't usually eat a whole one because it fills me up to much to run on.

I'm working on upping my distance, I've always been more of a sprinter...which for me maks 13.1 miles sound really long. lol. I usually run about 2 to 3 miles a day. But once I become more intentional about it probably after Christmas I will push myself to run farther.

Now that I'm on this gluten free diet, I can actually run farther than 2 miles a day easily! It makes running so much more fun!

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Hi Zach,

I ran my first marathon in May and am currently training for another next May. Training long distances will just plain make you tired (and I little bit sick of running at times). I use gels during long runs, since they are easy to carry and don't take up much room. My diet in general is low on starches, high on fruits, vegetables and meat - not the typical marathon training diet, but it works for me.

Remember to start slow, you've got to build up your mileage. That helps with staving off fatigue and injury. I use the runner's world Smart Coach for my training plans, which only has me running 2x a week. I cross train 3x a week on top of that and frequently those workouts involve running as well.

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Hi Zach,

I ran my first marathon in May and am currently training for another next May. Training long distances will just plain make you tired (and I little bit sick of running at times). I use gels during long runs, since they are easy to carry and don't take up much room. My diet in general is low on starches, high on fruits, vegetables and meat - not the typical marathon training diet, but it works for me.

Remember to start slow, you've got to build up your mileage. That helps with staving off fatigue and injury. I use the runner's world Smart Coach for my training plans, which only has me running 2x a week. I cross train 3x a week on top of that and frequently those workouts involve running as well.

Hi Kmag,

Thanks for the info. What are the gels you mention? I haven't heard of them.

thanks,

Zach

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School has been kind of crazy so I'm trying to get back into my normal running routine. I usually run about 4 to 5 times a week, but lately its been about 2 to 3.

I feel great when I eat one of the Zing bars.It give me a ton of energy. I don't usually eat a whole one because it fills me up to much to run on.

I'm working on upping my distance, I've always been more of a sprinter...which for me maks 13.1 miles sound really long. lol. I usually run about 2 to 3 miles a day. But once I become more intentional about it probably after Christmas I will push myself to run farther.

Now that I'm on this gluten free diet, I can actually run farther than 2 miles a day easily! It makes running so much more fun!

Sarah,

Thanks....so you eat them before the start of a run....have eaten them after a run? and do they seem to provide energy after the fact? my issue is low energy levels after any sports activities.

The 4-5 times a week are these long distances; more than 6 miles or less?

Thanks again for the info.

Zach

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Hi Zach, long time lurker, first time poster!

I have run three marathons since being diagnosed this past May, making it seven in total. I can assure you it is a very challenging goal, but in time you will find it's a great motivator and you just might get hooked!

When I was diagnosed I had a full marathon literally within a matter of weeks, so I had to go through a lot of tough changes, but once I got used to living gluten free I have found my races to be faster every time. My first race post-diagnosis was horrible, I had gotten gluetened the day before and suffered a host of ailments on race day (aching joints, stomach pain, the whole nine yards), but the two after that were much, much better and I have even set a personal record for myself with the last one. A gluten free diet does NOT slow you down whatsoever!

I run 6 days a week, one being a weekend long run, and I am more accustomed to distance, so my weekday runs can range from 5 to 11 daily, depending on my training load. I have found that training with "real foods" seems to work just fine, like raisins, gluten free pretzels, packets of honey, and even candy like M&Ms. But on race day I find that the gels are easier to deal with, and Gu, Powergel and Carb-Boom all have worked just fine. Do your research and see what works for you. I assure you my system is VERY trigger sensitive, and I have never had issues with any of the gels.

Since you are just getting started, I would recommend using Hal Higdon's plans, I find them to be good for those just starting out. You probably only need to maybe max out at 45 miles a week and get in at least one 20 miler and 2 18-milers. An 18 week plan is usually good for someone doing their first. You do it simply to finish, and then subsequent races you can work on bettering your time, tweaking training plans, etc. I make my own schedules and they seem to work fine.

I will say that you must pack your own food on race day, because the finish line spread will have next to nothing for you. I always bring a Think Thin protein bar to eat right away for muscle recovery. It's actually pretty tough to deal with actually, seeing all the awesome carb-laden food that you cannot have, but trust me, I am SO much better off without it. I could not be happier to be well, I think I have suffered for a LONG time and I am so glad to find out what was causing years of issues.

I wish you the best of luck with your efforts, and please feel free to ask questions!

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They're energy gels, basically sugar, sodium, and potassium. The come in little packets for easy transport and are somewhere around 100 calories depending on the brand. Like this: http://www.powerbar.com/products/41/powerbarsupsup-energy-gel-vanilla.aspx

I usually get them at Running Room.

Another product I have found useful during long runs (usually around miles 6 or 8) are the Clif Shot Bloks. They're nice because there are only 33 calories per block, so you can easily control how much of a boost you're getting during a workout.

Annie

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I also like the Cliff Shot Blocks as well as real food. I have run a half but am primarily a triathlete. It does seem like blocks of more intense training will highlight weaknesses in my program. I am gluten and dairy free and trying to eliminate nightshades. I have huge issues with joint pain, muscle weakness, bloating/swelling, and fatigue that adversely affect my training.

I find a journal that tracks my food as well as how I feel and perform to be very helpful. I slacked off recently and had a bad flare up of symptoms. I realized how important it was when I couldn't identify any patterns or culprits.

Overall, the training has actually helped me identify and manage the issues as I am so tuned in to my body. Good luck with the marathon and don't forget to HAVE FUN!!

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Sarah,

Thanks....so you eat them before the start of a run....have eaten them after a run? and do they seem to provide energy after the fact? my issue is low energy levels after any sports activities.

The 4-5 times a week are these long distances; more than 6 miles or less?

Thanks again for the info.

Zach

Yeah I usually eat them afterwords. Sometimes before I'll break off a little piece just for a boost of energy.

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I also like the Cliff Shot Blocks as well as real food. I have run a half but am primarily a triathlete. It does seem like blocks of more intense training will highlight weaknesses in my program. I am gluten and dairy free and trying to eliminate nightshades. I have huge issues with joint pain, muscle weakness, bloating/swelling, and fatigue that adversely affect my training.

I find a journal that tracks my food as well as how I feel and perform to be very helpful. I slacked off recently and had a bad flare up of symptoms. I realized how important it was when I couldn't identify any patterns or culprits.

Overall, the training has actually helped me identify and manage the issues as I am so tuned in to my body. Good luck with the marathon and don't forget to HAVE FUN!!

The Clif Website indicates that Shot Blocks are not gluten free. I was so disappointed to read this because this is what I used pre-diagnosis. Have you not had trouble with them making you sick?

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The Clif Website indicates that Shot Blocks are not gluten free. I was so disappointed to read this because this is what I used pre-diagnosis. Have you not had trouble with them making you sick?

Not sure what you are looking at. These are the ingredients for one of the flavors of Shot Bloks:

Organic Brown Rice Syrup, Organic Evaporated Cane Juice, Organic Brown Rice Syrup Solids, Pectin, Citric Acid, Green Tea Extract, Colored With Black Carrot Juice Concentrate, Natural Flavor, Organic Sunflower Oil, Carnauba Wax.

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Hi! I am new to the forum (though I have been lurking for about a year).

I am a runner, gluten free and a vegetarian. Last year I ran 3 half marathons, though I was plagued with injuries for the last two. I am currently signed up for a half at the end of February. My goal is to run a full next January.

To answer the original question--I really like Honey Stingers and Cliff Shot Bloks. I also will carry gluten free pretzels for long runs and endurolytes. My favorite recovery drink--Wendy's Chocolate Frostee.

I have also found that I have to check a bag at races--chances are other than fruit there will be nothing else to eat after the race. I still have problems occasionally with feeling like my blood sugar is crashing, and finding yourself at the end of a long run with nothing to eat is not good.

I am curious as to whether anyone else has trouble with injuries just taking forever to heal?

My brief history--Intestinal problems for years, brain fog, anxiety, etc. Every time I would try to lose weight my hair would start to fall out and I would just hit a wall where I felt exhausted. In 2010 I lost 50 pounds and got to my goal weight. Along the way I started running again. And the healthier I got (with weight loss, food, workouts, etc) the sicker I felt. I had horrid stomach pains--tried more fiber--that didn't work so well...My hair started coming out in chunks, I developed an irregular heart beat (which I saw a cardiologist for) and just kept developing symptom after symptom. I would be so sick after working out that I would have to eat salt packets because my electrolytes were so messed up. Saw a doctor. Negative blood test for c-d. Went Gluten-free anyway and started to feel better within a week. I did the enterolab tests and everything was very positive for gluten intolerance/malabsorption, etc. So I don't have an official diagnosis. I have a 20 yo, and I will eventually have the gene tests done, but he doesn't want to know right now as he is healthy and in college. But I think in the back of his mind he is assuming he will have to deal with this at some point.

So, having said all that going Gluten-free has been awesome for my overall health, but normal sports injuries are taking forever to heal. I had an ankle sprain, fad pad injury and plantar fasciitis in the same foot last spring and even with physical therapy and no running for for 3 months, it is still bothering me. My recovery time seems to still be very long. My irregular heart beat is gone. I feel great. I have a ton of energy. Just can't get rid of these injuries. I have been gluten free for almost a year.

Sorry to go on so long, but anyone else experience this?

I am really excited to find some other gluten free runners to chat with. My husband is very supportive of gluten free--and actually pushed me to try it even when I was hesitant, but it is nice to talk to other people who really get it.

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The Clif Website indicates that Shot Blocks are not gluten free. I was so disappointed to read this because this is what I used pre-diagnosis. Have you not had trouble with them making you sick?

I looked on their website and it's kind of confusing. The allergen table does not list even trace amounts of gluten as a concern, but when they answered the Gluten-free question they said they may contain gluten. I wonder if it's cause it is not a dedicated facility? I have not had any problems and I have a reaction from even small amounts.

OP--I missed the no dairy. So the frostee is out. Can you eat peanut butter? I eat peanut butter and Gluten-free pretzels after long runs.

And I saw someone mentioned Higdon. Galloway is another one you can look at. I was not a big fan of the run/walk stuff in the past, but have found it is easier on my body and helps to not feel so beat up. For my last 1/2 I did a ratio of run 5 minutes walk 1 minute. Currently since the foot is still not happy I am running 3 walking 1.

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Zach,

I'm newly diagnosed and an avid marathon runner. Haven't raced since my diagnosis though. It's very important to take in protein within 30 minutes after a workout. Whatever you decide to eat, try having a good amount of protein. And within an hour after that have a well balanced meal. If we don't eat enough after a hard workout, it can wear us out. Also, feeling wiped out a bit is normal post-workout. Consider other things in your life as well, not just food, that may be contributing to your tiredness.

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Rfin,

I hope your healing time isn't related to being gluten-free. I recently started a gluten-free diet and have had IT band problems for years. Crossing my fingers the gluten-free diet is the miracle cure!

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I am also training for a marathon.. i'd love to hear your feedback on things that work for you.

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Rfin,

I hope your healing time isn't related to being gluten-free. I recently started a gluten-free diet and have had IT band problems for years. Crossing my fingers the gluten-free diet is the miracle cure!

Sorry to post earlier and disappear. Life kind of got a little busy!

I really do think the healing time was related to being sick. Minor injuries just drug on forever. I am finally (after a year of injuries) running without pain--knock on wood. I am hoping that my body is finally healed enough that aches and pains aren't going to turn into injuries that put me on the sidelines. So it wasn't the gluten free diet that was making me take so long to heal, but rather that I was pretty run down and ill by the time I stopped eating gluten last year. My body just couldn't fix itself for a while.

I had itbs last year too--do you foam roller regularly? It stinks! So painful. I have new inserts for my shoes, and so far no new itbs problems.

*****

Having said all that, I am running a half marathon at WDW at the end of the month. I don't think I will be as fast as I was in the past, but I am hoping for a pain free run, and looking forward to lots of yummy gluten free food at WDW!

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Loved this post... I'm currently training for my first half marathon (May 6th, OMG, it's practically here.)

I was diagnosed just this month, and I've only been gluten free for a few weeks. I haven't noticed any difference in how I feel while training, but it's good to have some recs on protein bars if I start to feel a lag.

Rfin, I second the poster who suggested foam rolling. It does WONDERS for my ITB.

Happy Running!

J

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