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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Nature Valley Protein Bars
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7 posts in this topic

I am only one week into gluten-free diet and have a question. I picked these up at Sam's today (Peanut Butter Dark chocolate) and they are not labeled Gluten free like some Nature Valley bars, but don't see any unsafe ingredients...am I missing something? They are so new, General Mills does not have them listed on their site (that I could find)

Roasted Peanuts

Soy Protein Isolate

Chicory Root Extract

Sugar

Vegetable oils (palm kernel, palm, canola, peanut)

Whey Protein Concentrate

High Maltose Corn syrup

Cocoa

Fructose

Peanut Butter (peanuts salt)

Vegetable Glycerin

Rice Starch

HOney

Rice Maltodextrin

Salt

Soy Lecithin

Natural Flavor

Contains: Peanut, soy and milk ingredients

190 calories

12g fat

14 g

5g fiber

10g protein

Thanks,

Karen

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General Mills will clearly disclose by name any gluten by naming the grain in the ingredients list. They did not, so there is no gluten.

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General Mills will clearly disclose by name any gluten by naming the grain in the ingredients list. They did not, so there is no gluten.

I asked specifically whether these were gluten free on the Nature Valley facebook page and a representative told me they are not. :(

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I asked specifically whether these were gluten free on the Nature Valley facebook page and a representative told me they are not. :(

We come down, then, to the definition of "gluten-free."

In the US, there is no legal definition. Many companies produce products which are, in fact, gluten-free, but will not label them as gluten-free because they do not test them for gluten content, and even if they did, there is no definition of "gluten-free" that is legally enforceable.

I stand by my statement that General Mills (among others) will clearly disclose any gluten source intentionally included in the product. They do not test, and will not take a position that would make them legally liable for a mistake by one of their suppliers.

"Not gluten-free" does not necessarily mean "contains gluten."

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My daughter's doctor told me that if it doesn't specifically say "gluten free" then I should err on the safe side and not buy it for her. Just because it doesn't specifically contain any gluten-y ingredients, it may share a facility with products that do.

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My daughter's doctor told me that if it doesn't specifically say "gluten free" then I should err on the safe side and not buy it for her. Just because it doesn't specifically contain any gluten-y ingredients, it may share a facility with products that do.

If you're on the U. S. that may not necessarily be true. There are gluten-free labeled products out there that are made on shared lines/facilities.

I think Amy's is one them.

Note gluten-free labeling:

http://www.amys.com/products/product-detail/gluten-free/000130

Note allergy statement about cc:

http://www.amys.com/health/faq#faq_679

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General Mills will clearly disclose by name any gluten by naming the grain in the ingredients list. They did not, so there is no gluten.

according to this, they will disclose if they put it in the ingredient directly but, if it is processed in a facility with gluten, the front will simply not say 'gluten-free'. if you are worried about cross-contamination, only buy the boxes that specifically say gluten-free on the front.

http://www.gfreegirlfriend.com/2012/02/nature-valley-bars.html

"Thank you for contacting us about gluten in Nature Valley granola bars.

General Mills offers several products that are labeled gluten-free. Please check the package label for the gluten-free statement on the front/side/back of the package. Only products that can be verified to be gluten free will be declared as gluten free on the label. It is important to check the product label each time you purchase a product because it has the most accurate information about the product in the package.

Because we constantly strive to improve our products′ quality and nutritional value, the most up-to-date product information is on the package the product is purchased in. For that reason, we do not distribute product information lists as they could quickly become outdated. A current list of products on the market that are gluten free can be found by visiting www.glutenfreely.com. It is important to check the package label before purchasing for the gluten-free statement on the front/side/back of the package to verify that the package you choose is gluten free.

For products not labeled gluten free, we will always declare gluten containing ingredients if they are added to the product. If the ingredient declaration lists wheat, oats, barley, rye, or derivatives of these grains, then the product contains gluten. Examples of derivative ingredients include: malt, barley malt, organic malt, semolina, Durham, triticale, and spelt. We do not include gluten containing ingredients in the ′Natural Flavors′ or ′Spices′ on the product ingredient list. If there are gluten ingredients in our products, those ingredients are always clearly listed.

If there are no gluten- containing ingredients listed in the product ingredient label, but the product does not make a gluten free claim, it is because we cannot fully assure that this product is gluten free. While we have not added gluten-containing ingredients, factors such as sourcing, conditions of manufacture, etc. do not allow us to provide the full level of assurance that a gluten free claim requires.

Additional information regarding gluten may be obtained by contacting your health care professional or one of these organizations."

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