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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

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Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein-Gluten Free?
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I saw Jessica Alba on tv last night talking about her new company....eco friendly, non chemical prosucts at www.honest.com I went to browse the products and the one of the ingredients of the shampoo has be totally confused. It says hydrolyzed wheat protein (gluten free)! Is this possible or are they completely out to lunch?

http://www.honest.com/product/honest-shampoo

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I saw Jessica Alba on tv last night talking about her new company....eco friendly, non chemical prosucts at www.honest.com I went to browse the products and the one of the ingredients of the shampoo has be totally confused. It says hydrolyzed wheat protein (gluten free)! Is this possible or are they completely out to lunch?

http://www.honest.com/product/honest-shampoo

Has oats in it too.

Where is the gluten-free part?

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I saw Jessica Alba on tv last night talking about her new company....eco friendly, non chemical prosucts at www.honest.com I went to browse the products and the one of the ingredients of the shampoo has be totally confused. It says hydrolyzed wheat protein (gluten free)! Is this possible or are they completely out to lunch?

http://www.honest.com/product/honest-shampoo

Hydrolyzed wheat protein is processed and then re-processed,so much that the offending gluten is removed through this process...thus, rendering it gluten free. IF there is any residual gluten it would be so far below what is considered safe for people with Celiac to consume, ie. immeasurable trace.

It's not something I worry about. :)

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Read the full ingredient list, under a different tab.

Duh. Okay. I was looking all over the page.

If I understand the rules correctly there are different rules for food and body care, and it looks like the hydrolyzed wheat protein can be used in body care and be called gluten-free in the U. S.

Just like the degerminated wheat germ oil. Rolling my eyes...

Its rather irrelevant since it also contains oats, which aren't (gluten free).

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Its rather irrelevant since it also contains oats, which aren't (gluten free).

Oat are gluten free, but with a cross contamination potential.

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If I understand the rules correctly there are different rules for food and body care, and it looks like the hydrolyzed wheat protein can be used in body care and be called gluten-free in the U. S.

Yes, the disclosure law is different from food. The eight listed allergens are not required to be listed in cosmetics or meds. But, we're working on that.

Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein is gluten free, rendered by processing... in food or cosmetics.

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Oat are gluten free, but with a cross contamination potential.

Yes, I know that. They are so contaminated I won't consider them gluten-free unless so stated, though.

Sorry, should have been clearer.

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Hydrolyzed wheat protein may be considered gluten free but personally I wouldn't use it.

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I was diagnosed with celiac about a month ago, and am still coming up to speed with all of the 'rules of engagement'. I have taken care of most of the foods in my house, and am now starting to tackle the bathroom items.

Right now, I am stuck on this "hydrolyzed wheat protein". How do I know if it has gluten or not (is it by definition gluten-free, does it depend on how it is processed, and what does 'gluten-free' mean in this context (is there a ppm requirement))? I keep hearing mixed opinions on this topic. My favorite hair products do contain this ingredient. I am looking for a good replacement, but I have found some labeled 'gluten-free' that also include hydrolyzed wheat protein.

Any guidance would be greatly appreciated...

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I'm glad someone brought this up. I was just diagnosed (about two weeks ago, I'm a TOTAL newb!) I was looking through all the ingredients in my hair care products and was distressed to find Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein in some of them. I saw the word "wheat" and immediately thought that put them on my DO NOT USE list. Looks like I'll have to do some more research! And I'll be watching replies to this thread with interest.

J

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Lisa, can I ask where you got your information that processing renders hydrolyzed wheat protein gluten free? Every list I see of foods to avoid has this listed on it. I can't find any information other than this post stating that it's safe. I would love to cross it off my "avoid" list though :)

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I think this falls into the same category as Codex wheat starch in Europe.  It is not really gluten free but is supposedly below the threshold where most people react. I do not eat Codex wheat starch when traveling and I personally would not use hydrolyzed wheat starch in food.  They sell bags of it at Whole Foods and vegetarians use it. I would not eat it.

Quite frankly, it does not look very appetizing.

 

However, I do not screen shampoo/conditioner for it because I am not allergic to wheat, just intolerant, and I do not eat shampoo or swallow it accidentally.  I would not use it in body creme, for obvious reasons, or anything having to do with lip products.  But that's just me. For years it was on the unsafe lists and still is so I'm going with that!

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This is an old topic. I don't know why Lisa thought that hydrolyzing protein would render it safe. When this topic was started, there was no rule regulating "gluten-free" claims in the US. There is one in process for food, but shampoo is not food.

 

The Canadian Celiac Associations lists hydrolyzed wheat protein as an UNSAFE food ingredient. Shelley Case states it is UNSAFE in her book, Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide.

I would not consider anything containing hydrolyzed wheat protein to be gluten-free. Or safe for us.

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