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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Replacement For Oats
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15 posts in this topic

Hi

I am beginning to bake again as my husband loves my home baking. I have successfully converted many of my favourite recipes, but I would love to make him some of my flapjack recipe. I don't wish to try gluten-free Oats as I am particularly sensitive and don't want to risk it. Has anyone tried using a different grain in flapjacks?

FS xx

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I have not tried yet but plan on trying Almond flour or coconut flour for pancakes this weekend.

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Depends on the type of recipe-if it is one where you stir a whole grain in and can see that grain and feel the added texture when it's done or if it's a situation where it is oats that have been processed into a flour and then added.

I used to make "whole grain" pancakes with cooked cereals. Stir in a bit of your favorite cooked cereal into the batter-maybe a 1/4 c. I used to use Bob's Red Mill Might Tasty Hot Cereal. There might be some more instant type cooked grain cereals that would work dry. The Bob's won't work dry it doesn't have enough time to absorb and cook in the time a pancake cooks or so I think.

If you are looking for more of a flour type substitute, then maybe some almond flour or other flour.

Flax meal or quinoa flakes might work too.

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We have made amaranth pancakes that tasted pretty good!

Tell me if you want the recipe and I'll scan it for you!

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A former work colleague passed along the following recipe to me when I was diagnosed (her brother grew up with a Celiac Diagnosis -- this was a favorite from a time when there weren't many gluten-free options in the stores!) I haven't tried them yet since I can't easily find rice flour where I am currently living (Poland.)

Buttermilk Rice Flour Pancakes

2 cups sifted rice flour

2 Tbs. sugar

2 tsp. baking power

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. salt

2 eggs, beaten

2 cups buttermilk

4 Tbs. salad oil

Stir dry ingredients together in a medium bowl. Set aside.

Beat eggs, buttermilk, and salad oil together with whisk or hand mixer.

Pour buttermilk mixture into dry ingredients. Stir together until well combined. Let the batter rest for a few minutes. You may want to add more buttermilk or flour as need for desired consistency.

Preheat griddle (electric 350 degrees). Lightly grease. Use large spoon or small measuring cup to pour batter onto griddle. Turn pancakes when bubbles appear.

Serves 4. Cooked rice flour pancakes can stored in baggies in the freezer or refrigerator. These can be reheated in the microwave. We usually prepare pancakes on weekend and enjoy them fresh off the griddle but make enough for extras to be enjoyed during the week. We place 2 or 3 pancakes in a sandwich size zip lock baggie and place all these in a larger freezer bag.

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Here's my recipe for buckwheat pancakes that I adapted from my Fannie Farmer cookbook recipe for griddle cakes, and a small t = teaspoon, capital T = tablespoon:

1/2 cup white rice flour (substitute as needed, I'm going to experiment with sorghum this weekend)

1/4 cup tapioca flour / starch (same thing)

1/4 cup buckwheat flour

1/2 cup (organic) heavy cream *

1/2 cup (filtered) water

1 egg

2 t baking powder

1/4 t baking soda

2 T sugar

1/2 t salt

1/2 t psyllium husk powder

* the recipe called for milk, but I had cream available and it worked out. If using a substitute for a total of 1 cup liquid, you might want to add an acid such as a small amount (1/2 t?) of vinegar or cream of tartar.

Also, I used psyllium husk powder because without that (or xanthan gum or guar gum ?) they tend to crumble and fall apart when you try to flip them.

Mix the rice flour and psyllium husk powder with up to 1 cup of the liquid, let it sit for 10-15 minutes so the rice flour absorbs some of the liquid.Mix the rest of the dry ingredients together in another bowl, and add that and the rest of the 1 cup of liquid and the egg to the rice / psyllium mixture, mix well.

Heat a nonstick griddle until hot, coat with a small amount of butter before first batch, then drop or pour batter on to griddle. Turn them when the edges are dry and bubbles have stopped forming on top. Remove when the other side is nicely browned, keep warm in an oven or toaster oven while you make the rest of the pancakes. The batter will also stay good a day or 2 in the fridge, covered with plastic wrap.

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my recipe for waffle/pancakes

1/3 cup gluten free flour ( I buy the namaste premade mix)

1/3 cup almond flour

1/3 cup quinoa flour

2 tbls. baking powder

1 tsp. cinnamon

1/2 tsp. xanthem gum

4 tbls. sugar 1/2 brown 1/2 white

1 egg

2 tbls. oil

1tbs. vanilla extract

about 1 cup of milk give or take depending on consistency

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Egg Free, Dairy Free, Surprisingly Good gluten-free Buckwheat Pancakes or Flat Bread that does not even need gums or chia or flax

Makes 1 large or 2 small pancakes, 1 serving

Use a gluten free dedicated cast iron skillet for the best, easiest cooking. Preheat, add some olive oil or other oil, but if using olive oil, take care not to burn it.

Combine dry ingredients in small bowl or measuring cup:

1 heaping tablespoon buckwheat flour, gluten-free

1 heaping tablespoon potato starch, gluten-free

1 heaping tablespoon garbanzo bean flour, gluten-free

dash or pinch of salt

dash or pinch of cream of tartar

dash or about 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

spices, if desired, such as a pinch of Chinese 5 spice powder, cinnamon, anise seed, cinnamon, or cumin

wet ingredients:

teaspoon to tablespoon of olive oil or other oil, melted coconut oil, or other type

1/2 teaspoon of gluten-free pure apple cider vinegar or lemon juice

(optional) small spoon of molasses, agave, or other sweetener like stevia

enough water, when added to the dry ingredients, to make a thick batter (this varies, add slowly)

Combine wet and dry ingredients, stir to make batter, pour into heated, oiled skillet. Cook until bubbles come thru and edges start to dry out a little, and bottom is browned, then flip with spatula and finish cooking. Makes one pancake.

A chocolate variation of this can be made by adding cocoa powder and more sweetener, which is devastating good topped with other things like Enjoy Life Chocolate chips, cream cheese, peanut butter, bananas, etc. It can also be made and used as a quick sandwich bread.

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Flapjacks in UK is a granola-bar type item NOT the US pancake.

Flapjacks

4oz Butter

3oz Light soft brown sugar

3oz Golden syrup

8oz Gluten Free muesli OR

Make your own: eg:

2 oz rolled rice

2 oz rolled millet

1 oz chopped dried apple

1 oz chopped dried apricots

1 oz sultanas

1 oz pumpkin seeds

2 tbsp sunflower seeds

1 oz desiccated coconut

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Ah, I see we are divided by our common language. :D

Thank you all so much, but especially to Auzzi, who has realised my mistake. :rolleyes: Your recipe looks delicious and I shall certainly be trying it. As I don't use muesli, I think I shall try your mix. I thought perhaps rolled millet but I hadn't thought of rolled rice, I shall seek it out at the local Health Store.

Blessings - FS xx

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Instead of oats - try flaked almonds?

Here in NZ there is a product called rice flakes. I am sure that there are more products available out there but I am still battling for a few things in the gluten-free section at the local supermarket to be taken out - mmm like GLUTEN FLOUR.

:unsure:

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Hi

I am beginning to bake again as my husband loves my home baking. I have successfully converted many of my favourite recipes, but I would love to make him some of my flapjack recipe. I don't wish to try gluten-free Oats as I am particularly sensitive and don't want to risk it. Has anyone tried using a different grain in flapjacks?

FS xx

I love buckwheat (not from wheat) in pancakes and yeast breads. I recently made a great tasting/textured bread from buckwheat, cornmeal, sorghum, millet, potato starch and tapioca flour. It tasted just like I remember rye bread tasted.

If you want a safe substitute for oats, I used quinoa flakes, before certified gluten-free oats were available. I didn't like the taste of quinoa flakes as a hot cereal, but those were fine in cookies and quick breads. So those may be good in pancake mixes, but I never used oatmeal in pancake mixes. I've eaten certified gluten-free oats since they were available. I'm a 'super-sensitive' (excruciating gut pain reactions) celiac, but I never react to gluten-free oats.

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Well, if you're talking about a granola-type bar, then flaked coconut is a great choice. I've read good reviews regarding the use of quinoa flakes in place of oats, but have yet to try them. Also haven't found or tried rice flakes, but it sounds like a good idea as well.

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ro;;ed rice is called "pohu" at the asian supermarket - it comes thin, medium and thick rolled...

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Thanks peeps. Flaked coconut a grand idea, but husband dislikes coconut, so think I shall stick with the rolled rice, quinoa and millet, and some seeds and fruit always go in anyway.

:)

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