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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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BarryC

Sleep Apnea

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I am a sleep apnea specialist. Sleep apnea is related to obesitas, diabetic, congestive heartfailure, anatomy of jaw/thoat, being male, or just runs in the family, but a relation with celiac disease seems VERY unlikely to me. But I am never to old to learn something new. Who will know. Though it seems very unlikely to me. 

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On 5/20/2017 at 11:27 PM, Dugudugu said:

I am a sleep apnea specialist. Sleep apnea is related to obesitas, diabetic, congestive heartfailure, anatomy of jaw/thoat, being male, or just runs in the family, but a relation with celiac disease seems VERY unlikely to me. But I am never to old to learn something new. Who will know. Though it seems very unlikely to me. 

Vitamin D deficiency is connected to sleep apnea.  

Vitamin D deficiency is common with Celiac Disease.  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26414899

 Hope this helps!

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8 hours ago, knitty kitty said:

Vitamin D deficiency is connected to sleep apnea.  

Vitamin D deficiency is common with Celiac Disease.  

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26414899

 Hope this helps!

At least in Caucasian Irish people!

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On 2012-2-1 at 7:35 AM, BarryC said:

Anyone else suffer from this? Is it a symptom of gluten intolerance?

My friend cannot sleep because of constant wind )zbeltching from the colon can u digest anything that will help her thnks Peter  in Christchurch New Zealand. 

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On 5/25/2017 at 10:29 AM, Peter John freeth said:

My friend cannot sleep because of constant wind )zbeltching from the colon can u digest anything that will help her thnks Peter  in Christchurch New Zealand. 

Try posting this as a separate topic. This is a discussion of sleep apnea which is different than your friend's problem.

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I have gone through the sleep apnea studies and was confirmed.  However I am uncertain of their diagnosis even 15 or so years afterward.  Seeing as how I wake up in the night to poop and then return to actual sleep, do I necessarily have true sleep apnea?

Edited by EileenaBalerina
mistakenly thought of adding to my post.

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48 minutes ago, EileenaBalerina said:

I have gone through the sleep apnea studies and was confirmed.  However I am uncertain of their diagnosis even 15 or so years afterward.  Seeing as how I wake up in the night to poop and then return to actual sleep, do I necessarily have true sleep apnea?

If you have had a sleep study and been diagnosed, you have sleep apnea. It's definitely different than waking up to go to the bathroom. Are you using your cpap every night for The entire night. Naps too? SA can actually cause death so it's very Important for you to use it every time you sleep. Do you follow up with your doctor yearly? Sorry to sound like the SA police, but I know someone who died from it. He wasn't using his cpap anymore, thought it was uncomfortable.

 

 

What Is Sleep Apnea?

 

Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep. When your breathing pauses or becomes shallow, you’ll often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep.

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BarryC,

And as Victoria1234 said posting for new people who might read this thread.

( I did not realize the OP asked this several years ago now until I saw Victoria1234 recent activity)

The role Magnesium plays in healthy sleepy patterns have been overlooked my many modern clinicians today.

George eby is the person I have seen who has done the most to elevate Magnesium role in health today.

And where I first discovered Magnesium Citrate and helped my chronic fatigue symptoms.  He (George) prefers Magnesium Glycinate (due to it's limited ability to produce diarrhea associated with too much Magnesium Citrate at any one dose)

Here is a couple links (Knitty Kitty is better at this than me) that talks about Magnesium's role in sleep quality.

This one is on poor sleep quality.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21199787

And this one on insomnia

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3703169/

where they conclude

"Supplementation of magnesium appears to improve subjective and objective measures of insomnia in elderly people and may become a useful instrument in managing sleep disorders in the elderly, which could also be extended as a helpful aid to the general population."

For newbie's check out Ennis_Tx post's he covers Magnesium well.

I hope this is helpful.

posterboy by the grace of God,

 

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I was formally diagnosed with asthma twice - once at age ~8, then again at age 16 (they thought I grew out of it... they thought wrong). My primary symptom that prompted my parents to take me for visit to the doctor was persistent sleep apnea wherein I would stop breathing completely in my sleep, wake up and be so terrified that I would launch into a full-blown asthma attack lasting several minutes.  Intense emotions can trigger asthma attacks, and in my case, being scared is bad news. And waking up not being able to breathe when you are 8 is very scary.

Inhalers seemed to correct the issue for the most part. However, I had to be on a very high corticosteroid inhaler and had to use a salbutamol inhaler if I wanted to do any sort of physical activity without feeling like I was breathing through a straw/drowning in mucus. Even then, as an adult I would still occasionally have episodes of sleep apnea bad enough that I would wake up not breathing. I had a lot of allergy testing done (by allergist/immunologist), but most of the environmental allergies I had were to things that are impossible to avoid (grass, dust etc.). 

The gluten-free diet has effectively gotten rid of all of this, starting about 4 months after commencing the diet. I no longer take any daily asthma medication, but do keep my rescue salbutamol inhaler just in case. If I get glutened very badly, I notice my asthma symptoms return for a few days-weeks. I have not had any asthma testing done since I was in high school, so I have no idea to what clinical degree my lung function has actually improved - but in terms of "real world" functionality, it is day and night. As weird as it sounds, I don't think I ever knew what it felt like to be able to breathe fully until I was 24.

It's quite funny when you look at the literature on this topic - many sources are adamant that breathing issues never occur with celiac disease, but others describe asthma/allergies/autoimmunity as often co-occurring. My anecdotal experience aside, it seems quite reasonable to assume that celiac disease and asthma (which can cause sleep apnea) could interact. Both are immune disorders and both involve systemic inflammation. If you take what's driving much of the systemic inflammation (celiac disease) out of the equation, then it seems reasonable to assume that you might get an improvement elsewhere.

 

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4 hours ago, apprehensiveengineer said:

I was formally diagnosed with asthma twice - once at age ~8, then again at age 16 (they thought I grew out of it... they thought wrong). My primary symptom that prompted my parents to take me for visit to the doctor was persistent sleep apnea wherein I would stop breathing completely in my sleep, wake up and be so terrified that I would launch into a full-blown asthma attack lasting several minutes.  Intense emotions can trigger asthma attacks, and in my case, being scared is bad news. And waking up not being able to breathe when you are 8 is very scary.

Inhalers seemed to correct the issue for the most part. However, I had to be on a very high corticosteroid inhaler and had to use a salbutamol inhaler if I wanted to do any sort of physical activity without feeling like I was breathing through a straw/drowning in mucus. Even then, as an adult I would still occasionally have episodes of sleep apnea bad enough that I would wake up not breathing. I had a lot of allergy testing done (by allergist/immunologist), but most of the environmental allergies I had were to things that are impossible to avoid (grass, dust etc.). 

The gluten-free diet has effectively gotten rid of all of this, starting about 4 months after commencing the diet. I no longer take any daily asthma medication, but do keep my rescue salbutamol inhaler just in case. If I get glutened very badly, I notice my asthma symptoms return for a few days-weeks. I have not had any asthma testing done since I was in high school, so I have no idea to what clinical degree my lung function has actually improved - but in terms of "real world" functionality, it is day and night. As weird as it sounds, I don't think I ever knew what it felt like to be able to breathe fully until I was 24.

It's quite funny when you look at the literature on this topic - many sources are adamant that breathing issues never occur with celiac disease, but others describe asthma/allergies/autoimmunity as often co-occurring. My anecdotal experience aside, it seems quite reasonable to assume that celiac disease and asthma (which can cause sleep apnea) could interact. Both are immune disorders and both involve systemic inflammation. If you take what's driving much of the systemic inflammation (celiac disease) out of the equation, then it seems reasonable to assume that you might get an improvement elsewhere.

 

When you were young, did your cpap machine not control your sleep apnea well? What did your apnea doctor say or do for you when you had these severe episodes? I've never heard of anyone having such a hard time after Their diagnosis and treatment!

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4 hours ago, apprehensiveengineer said:

 

 

It's quite funny when you look at the literature on this topic - many sources are adamant that breathing issues never occur with celiac disease, but others describe asthma/allergies/autoimmunity as often co-occurring. My anecdotal experience aside, it seems quite reasonable to assume that celiac disease and asthma (which can cause sleep apnea) could interact. Both are immune disorders and both involve systemic inflammation. If you take what's driving much of the systemic inflammation (celiac disease) out of the equation, then it seems reasonable to assume that you might get an improvement elsewhere.

 

Celiac inflammation definately caused asthma in me also. I was on Singulair and had an albuteral inhalor. Never needed either after I was diagnosed. There is definately an association between celiac and asthma IMHO. I wonder if in some cases both the inflammation and brain impact might be behind some cases of apnea.

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20 hours ago, Victoria1234 said:

When you were young, did your cpap machine not control your sleep apnea well? What did your apnea doctor say or do for you when you had these severe episodes? I've never heard of anyone having such a hard time after Their diagnosis and treatment!

As far as I recall, I only saw my GP. Basically, I went in and my mother described the episodes and gave me an inhaler to see if it would help. Don't recall what medication it was specifically as I was too young, but it did actually control the apnea episodes at that time (as far as I was aware at the time). Since it did seem to help, no further investigation was done and I was taken off the inhaler after ~8months. I think the explanation they gave me was that it was a "growing thing" that kids sometimes get. Unfortunately this seems to have been a popular explanation for all the things that went wrong with me as a child/young adult :blink:.

When I was 16 I started having issues again, and was formally tested for asthma via spirometry. As an adult, my problems were more during waking life (was/am an athlete). Issues during sleep were pretty sporadic, and to be honest not something I considered to be all that disruptive, especially compared to my increasingly messed up stomach problems at that time. Didn't really think about it all that much until now, when I realized I don't really get those sleep apnea episodes anymore.

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6 hours ago, apprehensiveengineer said:

As far as I recall, I only saw my GP. Basically, I went in and my mother described the episodes and gave me an inhaler to see if it would help. Don't recall what medication it was specifically as I was too young, but it did actually control the apnea episodes at that time (as far as I was aware at the time). Since it did seem to help, no further investigation was done and I was taken off the inhaler after ~8months. I think the explanation they gave me was that it was a "growing thing" that kids sometimes get. Unfortunately this seems to have been a popular explanation for all the things that went wrong with me as a child/young adult :blink:.

When I was 16 I started having issues again, and was formally tested for asthma via spirometry. As an adult, my problems were more during waking life (was/am an athlete). Issues during sleep were pretty sporadic, and to be honest not something I considered to be all that disruptive, especially compared to my increasingly messed up stomach problems at that time. Didn't really think about it all that much until now, when I realized I don't really get those sleep apnea episodes anymore.

I've never heard of an inhaler given for sleep apnea, but I'm happy it worked for you! I was never aware of my own severe sleep apnea. It was my husband who told me I would stop breathing for periods of time and gasp to start breathing again. So I went for a sleep study and I was having 60 episodes an hour. The Cpap Helped a lot with increased alertness. I had been falling asleep all day long. Scariest was at red lights.

 

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Well, I think it was more that my sleep apnea was a symptom of asthma, so controlling that got rid of the problem. Since most asthma inhalers act to relax the respiratory muscles and/or reduce mucus product and inflammation in the lungs, I'd guess that this strategy wouldn't work unless the sleep apnea was due to asthma/inflammation in the respiratory tract. Same principle for the GFD in celiacs with sleep apnea I would guess too.

Though I don't remember having any formal testing done when I was 8, the part about me still not being able to breathe (due to panic) when I woke up would be pretty indicative of asthma. I now no longer need to use any inhalers, which is pretty exciting as the corticosteroid ones I was on have some gnarly long-term side effects (osteoporosis etc.). 

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1 hour ago, apprehensiveengineer said:

Well, I think it was more that my sleep apnea was a symptom of asthma, so controlling that got rid of the problem. Since most asthma inhalers act to relax the respiratory muscles and/or reduce mucus product and inflammation in the lungs, I'd guess that this strategy wouldn't work unless the sleep apnea was due to asthma/inflammation in the respiratory tract. Same principle for the GFD in celiacs with sleep apnea I would guess too.

Though I don't remember having any formal testing done when I was 8, the part about me still not being able to breathe (due to panic) when I woke up would be pretty indicative of asthma. I now no longer need to use any inhalers, which is pretty exciting as the corticosteroid ones I was on have some gnarly long-term side effects (osteoporosis etc.). 

That's great your asthma is gone! Mine disappeared at some point but I can't recall ATM if it was before or after going gluten-free. My oldest son was on a bunch of things when he was small including singulair and advair, and it definitely affected his stature. But he probably would have died without them, his asthma was so bad.

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On 9/9/2017 at 11:20 AM, Victoria1234 said:

That's great your asthma is gone! Mine disappeared at some point but I can't recall ATM if it was before or after going gluten-free. My oldest son was on a bunch of things when he was small including singulair and advair, and it definitely affected his stature. But he probably would have died without them, his asthma was so bad.

:)

That's horrible about your son though. I suspect that the meds I was on didn't help my bone quality, but luckily I was not on them for most of the time I was growing. Fortunately, my asthma has always been on the less severe side so I've not really had too many scary moments.

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