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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

A.D.D.
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Here is something interesting. I used to be an avid reader, but last year, during my second vegetarian phase, I lost all desire to read. This along with mild depression. This happened the first time I went vegan too. It had to be increased consumption of bread and pasta to make up for lack of meat. Now being gluten free for a month, I am back to enjoying reading, and feel much better emotionally and mentally. I'm NOT going back. Also, my A.D.D. symptoms have improved. Anyone else?

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Since you're back to reading now, I'd like to suggest a great book that includes a discussion on gluten associated with ADHD and ADD. It discusses the myriad neurological problems that can be caused by gluten, and it's the best book I've ever read on nutrition. It's called, "Primal Body, Primal Mind," by Nora Gedgaudas, and you can buy it quite cheaply through (Company Name Removed - They Spammed This Forum and are Banned). It sounds as though you've ceased eating a vegan/vegetarian diet, which is good, because the author points out that neurological damage is oftentimes the result of such a diet.

By the way, I noticed that you posted four times on the same subject, so some people might think they represent one posting that appeared multiple times. If you decide to add information to your original post, you can click on "edit" just below your posting, and the system allows you to go back into your original text so that you can revise or add to it. I know you're new at this....so I just thought I'd mention it. Welcome to the Forum! You'll find many knowledgeable people here.

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Thanks. Multiple postings prob A.D.D. symptom. Its a lot better but not gone. I think the gluten intolerance might make you more susceptible to diseases or magnify the symptoms if you already have them. Thanks for helping this rookie out! I especially want to help kids so they dont have to go through what I did-just think-eating gluten can be the cause of some mental and emotional things, especially when your hormones and systems are just developing.

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I agree with you wholeheartedly! Sadly, I oftentimes see young people (some as young as five) who suddenly develop neurological and emotional problems. The education system seems ill prepared to recognize what may be causing the sudden, strange behavior, and these young people end up in special schools or expelled. I believe that educators need to be informed of food intolerances and their effects on behavior.

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This is so interesting! I'm ADD and have experienced the same thing! I've only been gluten-free for one week now so I can't say I've seen any improvement in that...

When I went vegan and vegetarian I got SO sick. I thought I wasn't eating right and now getting enough nutrients, but I now find it was because I was taken in a lot more of the gluten-containing foods like wheat. I'm really looking forward to getting good at being gluten-free and then going vegan again.

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This is my first post on the forum. I am happy to say that within a week of going gluten free my ADD symptoms disappeared. I'd been dealing with many of the ADD issues since childhood, and into my 40's. I always struggled with names, faces, reading fiction, impulsive behavior, etc. I had a substantial personality change after dropping the gluten, all positive changes too.

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How do you think we should inform educators of this? I'm all ears.

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It seems it will take many yrs before the education systems will embrace gluten intolerance as a possible cause of ADD and resulting learning disabilities. As a former high school teacher myself, I must admit that I was skeptical of the ADD diagnosis as a cause of behavior and poor student performance. However, I always knew that I too had all the classic ADD symptoms myself.

But at age 44 I discovered that I was gluten intolerant--- within one week of being gluten-free, I felt a miraculous transformation. Not only gut-wise, but suddenly (for first time in my life) I had no ADD symptoms. Imagine the improved lives of thousands (possibly millions) of school age kids once gluten free is understood as a possible cure--- perhaps better behavior, higher test scores, greater success, happier lives!

But it's very complicated. For instance- imagine the challenge of making a public school cafeteria gluten free!?

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    • Hello and welcome I don't have celiac. I do have several symptoms in common with you and I do have a problem with gluten, so NCGS for want of a better term.  A celiac response to gluten involves the immune system so there certainly can be a delay between ingestion and the body producing the antibodies. That would correlate with your tongue aching progressively through the week. Some of the weirder symptoms of celiac occur because those antibodies that have identified gluten proteins as a problem then attack different parts of the body, maybe that's the more delayed reaction in your case. Last time I was glutened definitely I noticed some reaction in a few hours but it was a couple of days before I was certain. After effects can last for weeks or months even.  Wheat allergy is the one with the instant response, it's IGE mediated and so you can have an immediate surge in histamines and in extreme cases anaphylaptic reaction. NCGS is less well understood, some dispute it's existince or question if gluten is the cause. The symptoms however are similar to celiac as far as I know and that includes response time.  You've been through a miserable time but your still young and you need to decide whether you want to pursue a diagnosis or not. If you do, then it will require a gluten challenge of probably 6-12 weeks. See the links below for more details.  If you don't I suggest you go strictly gluten free, keep a food diary and see if the improvements you noted before continue. I think you've probably found your answer. Best of luck!   Further reading https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/
    • This is why many of us stick to our own "Trusted Brands" of things we know are safe, and only buy stuff with the offical certification for gluten free. NOTE also in the US they do not HAVE to tell you their facility also processes wheat on the label, just if the actual product contains it in the ingredients. But many will just to avoid legal mumbo jumbo if they somehow have CC issues. Saying the facility also contains/processes wheat is just them covering themselves if people get sick from it.
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    • I and many others here have been there and sympathise! Keep on keepin' on, it won't be long now before you can start feeling better. In the meantime, if there's a cheesecake, pastry etc that you want to say goodbye to, now's the time...
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