• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Who's In Their 20's?
0

36 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

LRgirl    0

Hi,

I'm 26 and from Maryland. It has been hard adjusting to my gluten intolerance as well as other allergies. You'll find this to be a very helpful and supportive board.

Traci

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Guest zipy   
Guest zipy

Hi there! I'm 25 and was dxed about 1 month ago. I'm a grad. student at ASU and it's hard to be gluten-free. All the parties, socials, gatherings...free pizza by the Greek rush ....it's not much fun to be on the outside of all the "fun" and normal stuff. I was thinking about seeing if there is gluten-free student support group on campus, or maybe looking in to starting one? I mean, what do students stuck in the dorms eat when they buy a meal plan? Hang in there...I'm making all my own foods from scratch and it is a pain and does take a lot of time...but they taste good! I chewed my husband out the other day for eating my home-made gluten-free granola bars when we have a pantry full of the store bought ones...he said he liked mine better! Lol!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
happygirl    6

It's nice to know that there are others out there that are young and living gluten free (or trying the best we can!). I've never met anyone with celiac disease so it makes me feel better to know that there are others like me :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just turned 30 a few months ago (ok, 7 seven months ago).

I have been diagnosed since 1997.

The first couple of years were difficult, but they got easier.

You should always be reading about celiac disease and always be reading about food. I have plenty of cookbooks and food-educational sources at home. The more knowledge the better.

This site is great, better than any Doctor I have ever seen. Welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey everyone, my name is Ken and I'm 24 years old. I was diagnosed in October, and had been getting sick for about 5 years previously. I'm new to all this posting stuff, but I wanted to hear from more people my age that have this disease. GFSTUDENT, if you allow your body some time to heal; there's a good chance that you will be able to tolerate more foods in the future. Eating a very restrictive diet for a limited time is a small price to pay if it buys you years of health in the future. As someone else posted (I forget who), dealing with eating out with friends is a difficult situation for me. My friends will laugh when I bring my cooler of food on the golf course, as they're all toating their coolers of beer, but oh well. A quick note to everyone.. I recently returned from Disney World, which was the first vacation I have taken since being on the diet, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone. As long as you make all the reservations with advance notice and alert them to your restrictions, they were more than accomodating. Each head chef came over to talk to me, which made the trip a lot less stressful for me (and therefore my girlfriend). I'm living outside of Philly, so anyone in the area email me or post back... i haven't met anyone aside from 50 year olds with this, so it will be nice to talk to someone more my age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 27 and was diagnosed with celiac disease slightly over a year ago, but I've had signs of it since infancy.

I'm in my twenties, too. I think people our age are more open to the idea of food causing illness, compared to my grandparents' generation. I think it's because there's more awareness now that not everything can be solved with a "suck it up, get over it, and move on" --type attitude. You know, the mentality that says, "if I don't see gushing blood, you're just fine." Has anyone else noticed this? In my experience, when I tell someone 30 years older than me what celiac disease is, I'm much more likely to get a skeptical reaction than if I tell someone my own age.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes, I've had a similar reaction even though I had most of the same health issues (and more) as the middle aged people I'd encounter. I was also told, "You're young; you'll bounce back from anything" repeatedly pre-diagnosis. I still haven't bounced back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lauren M    1
I'm living outside of Philly, so anyone in the area email me or post back

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey Ken - I'm in grad school at Drexel!

Do you ever visit Mr. Ritts in Philly?

- Lauren

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey Ken - I'm in grad school at Drexel!

Do you ever visit Mr. Ritts in Philly?

- Lauren

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hey Lauren - I've been to Mr. Ritts a couple of times. Their jewish apple cake is ridiculously good. what are you going to school for? i graduated from jefferson last year.

ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lauren M    1

Ken,

I'm getting my masters in Publication Management. I have my bachelors in Rhetoric & Communications. For one of my grad classes last year, I "created" a magazine entirely about Celiac disease and the gluten-free diet :P

I think EVERYTHING at Mr. Ritts is ridiculously good! I'll have to try the apple cake next time. I got my birthday cake from them last year (my only request was that it had to have chocolate and it had to have peanut butter) and they came up with something that was to die for :D

It's cool to find out about others my age with celiac disease! And you're all so nice!

- Lauren

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in my (late) 20's as well, but I have to say that I haven't had too much trouble with people regarding celiac disease overall. My husband's family have really been the only ones to have a strange reaction ("can't she just take some benadryl?").

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jkmunchkin    1

Welcome! I'm 27 (will be 28 in just over a week). I just found out a couple months ago that I have celiacs, but have most likely had it for nearly 10 years. Atleast now I know why I was always sick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,919
    • Total Posts
      938,683
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      65,843
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    SherriLynn
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • This - I agree with all of this. I have also twigged that if oats are a problem then certified processed gluten free food is out. And I got really sick from drywall. It's such a relief to hear this as there was a time when I was feeling like an alien for thinking these things. Well I agree 99.9%. I had a skin problem, possibly DH, which got better when I gave up gluten, improved further when I gave up processed foods but it wasn't until I stopped eating dry beans that I stopped getting any flares. I am also sensitive to egg though (although that does something different to my skin) so I'm a bit a skin-reactive person. Could be worth cutting it out just to see if that helps?
    • Hi Celiac4762, The carbs I eat are sweet potato, parsnip and squash plus loads of fruit. With rice I'm ok if it's from a reputable source. If I ever get glutened by something then I steer clear of it for a month to give myself an extra break and then go back to it in smallish quantities. I have carbs once a day rather than every meal to save time. I can hear in your tone this tired, fed up tone that I recognise so well from when I get glutened. I know what it's like to dream of living in a far away gluten free bubble. I felt like that but after a couple of months (which were a hard adjustment) I got to a stage of knowing what I needed to do. Your medical background will help you methodically work out what you need to cut out and what is safe and you will get there. Stick with college. Don't let this crappy stage take that away.   The thing that saved me though over everything was finding this article: https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-13-40
    • Thanks to both of you. Ok, so I was feeling not great and went grain free for 5 weeks. Then slowly started to introduce grains. All seemed ok, then I had an issue after 3 weeks, with blood in my stool. Celiac wasn't on my radar. In fact, rice and oats are what seem to bother me most. But the Dr added on the celiac test and it was indeterminate. So I was sent for endoscopy and colonoscopy. I consumed gluten for just over two weeks, then went back to my grain free, dairy free diet. I saw my Dr this am and she said my bowels were healthy, that the Dr had taken 'several' samples and that all is well on both ends.  (No celiac, but also not H Pylori, crohn's, etc). She is running all kinds of other bloodwork, because I am still feeling terrible, and obviously the assumption I had made was that it was celiac. I'm going to stay off gluten for now, in hopes that I'll start to feel better. My GI symptoms are worse this week than they have been in ages...so something is up, but apparently I'm healthy??! I am pretty sure my Dr. would not refer me to another GI. She's not the best, but it's very hard to find another Dr. here, especially if you already have a Dr. (Canada) I am going to ask her for a copy of the report though, as well as the rest of the bloodwork she's sending me for. 
    • This is exactly what I'm wondering also.
  • Upcoming Events