• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Why Am I Losing Strength?
0

21 posts in this topic

Yesterday was the first day of 2012 which I cycled as the snow has melted away :-) It went great, the whether was nice and I really enjoyed it because paddling was not a challenge. I know however that if I keep on cycling.. let's say one-hour rides once every two days, I will be getting weaker and weaker until I'm not able to push on the paddles anymore (by the middle of week 2), and cycling even on straight roads will become a struggle, as if the bicycle is refusing to move forward. I would then stop cycling all together for more than a week or two. After that I notice that my bicycle can be pushed forward with ease again.

From what I know, the more one exercises the stronger they get. So obviously I'm either lacking supplements or not stretching enough. Anyone else have this problem, and how did you solve it?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Have you had this checked out by a doctor? Yes, your muscles SHOULD get stronger. Muscles that become weak from exercise can indicate a number of illnesses that are NOT related to celiac. Many people with celiac develop other auto-immune diseases....so if you haven't had this particular problem evaluated, I would highly recommend that you do so. This could be a serious matter.

Alternatively, you may have either pernicious anemia or iron anemia, which would exhaust your muscles because they're not getting enough oxygen. Have you been tested for low Vitamin B-12 and iron? If not, this would be a good place to start.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being hypothyroid does that to me. I don't recover from exercise properly.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks both of you for the input. I haven't been checked yet, still waiting for appointment, but I did have thyroid checked two years ago I think, and it was fine. I would say it might be b12 / iron since I'm getting these sores at the corners of mouth.

I got myself some all-round supplements a few days ago. It was all the pharmacist could provide until I see the doc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's quite possible that you're unable to absorb supplements right now, so you may find that the supplement the pharmacist gave you won't help at all. For some of us, we need to get our iron intravenously and either B-12 injections or sublingual tablets. The sublingual tablets are really inexpensive, so you might just try picking some up. If it's a B-12 problem, you'll see almost immediate improvement.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


It's quite possible that you're unable to absorb supplements right now, so you may find that the supplement the pharmacist gave you won't help at all. For some of us, we need to get our iron intravenously and either B-12 injections or sublingual tablets. The sublingual tablets are really inexpensive, so you might just try picking some up. If it's a B-12 problem, you'll see almost immediate improvement.

Thanks for your advice Rosetapper xoxo :-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're welcome! But, please, see a doctor if you can--the muscle weakness you describe is very worrisome.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, you're not on a cholesterol-lowering drug are you?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will see a doctor. It can take a while as the health-care here is as fast as a turtle unless someone is dying.

Nope, I don't take any drugs. The only thing I used to take was birth-control for the amenorrhea which I stopped two months ago.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to hear that it takes so long to see a doctor. When you attempt to get an appointment, please stress that you're experiencing muscle weakness upon exertion that worsens the more you exercise. Hopefully, they'll wake up and schedule an appointment soon.

Good luck! And please let us know what happens, okay?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry to hear that it takes so long to see a doctor. When you attempt to get an appointment, please stress that you're experiencing muscle weakness upon exertion that worsens the more you exercise. Hopefully, they'll wake up and schedule an appointment soon.

Good luck! And please let us know what happens, okay?

Thanks for the support, and will let you know :-) Xoxoxoxo

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A new question popped i my head, for anyone with experience in this.. whether it's my thyroid or lack of iron/b12.. should I be taking easy when I'm experiencing muscle fatigue or can I go on doing as I please on my bicycle :-D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A new question popped i my head, for anyone with experience in this.. whether it's my thyroid or lack of iron/b12.. should I be taking easy when I'm experiencing muscle fatigue or can I go on doing as I please on my bicycle :-D

I don't know. I think that's a question for your doctor. :unsure: One thing to keep in mind is that sports injuries are much more common when people are extremely fatigued.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can understand the healthcare being slow. It's a pain in the rear.

However, if you do eventually get tested for coeliacs, don't forget to start eating gluten again before you do, so that it will show up in your tests that indeed your body cannot handle the gluten. I hope though that the reason you're losing strength isn't bad and can be easily fixed :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say it might be b12 / iron since I'm getting these sores at the corners of mouth.

Sores at the corners of my mouth went away when I stopped using toothpaste and mouthwash. I checked with my dental hygienist and she said it was really the brushing, not the polish, that cleans teeth. 2 years, 2 more hygienists and 2 dentists (we moved) have all confirmed that my teeth are fine (I floss 1x/day and brush 2x/day).

Not that it couldn't also be b12/iron issues, just that this helped me a lot! Full disclosure: I am consistently, barely below normal levels for my iron (have been since childhood).

Good luck!

On exercise, check out the greenling post with lots of responses on this sports/fitness forum about starting workouts again - consensus is that we recovering celiacs may need more rest days than we used to for our muscles/bodies to recover. So think about bicycling but perhaps not as many days a week as you would have 'once upon a time' - see how that goes.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sores at the corners of my mouth went away when I stopped using toothpaste and mouthwash. I checked with my dental hygienist and she said it was really the brushing, not the polish, that cleans teeth. 2 years, 2 more hygienists and 2 dentists (we moved) have all confirmed that my teeth are fine (I floss 1x/day and brush 2x/day).

Not that it couldn't also be b12/iron issues, just that this helped me a lot! Full disclosure: I am consistently, barely below normal levels for my iron (have been since childhood).

Good luck!

On exercise, check out the greenling post with lots of responses on this sports/fitness forum about starting workouts again - consensus is that we recovering celiacs may need more rest days than we used to for our muscles/bodies to recover. So think about bicycling but perhaps not as many days a week as you would have 'once upon a time' - see how that goes.

Hi Babysteps :-) Thanks for the recommendations!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you been glutened recently? My husband found that after diagnosis and a gluten free diet he became much stronger despite thinking that he had no symptoms before diagnosis. I also became much stronger, but I had so many symptoms that it could easily have just been from being sick. He was on a business trip recently and suspects that he got a fair amount of accidental gluten consumption. Then he noticed that he was weaker. This has lasted a few weeks for him.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can understand the healthcare being slow. It's a pain in the rear.

However, if you do eventually get tested for coeliacs, don't forget to start eating gluten again before you do, so that it will show up in your tests that indeed your body cannot handle the gluten. I hope though that the reason you're losing strength isn't bad and can be easily fixed :)

Sorry about the misfire, folks. I'm a little ADD and my computer and connection are too slow.

I must disagree with both of these statements.

I caution anyone with possible celiac disease who has been gluten free for 2 months, especially those who have been gluten-free for 6 months, against gluten challenges. Your immune system will likely be hair trigger, greatly more able to respond more powerfully, and very angry. You can easily get a new autoimmune disease very quickly, and you may not be able to recover from it. This means you could permanently lose the functioning of an organ, or take many years to recover only partially. This means that the most likely organs to be the next target of your immune system are your brain or your endocrine system. I'm speaking from my own experience, as well as from listening to a gluten intolerant doctor who has written for celiac.com, who has more than 20 years of clinical experience specializing in gluten intolerance, and my own primary care MD, who has the same length of experience specializing in gluten intolerance, and who has it herself, as well as 4 years of thousands of email correspondences with thousands of other celiacs on another forum.

I also disagree that losing strength can be easily fixed. I have always loved bicycling, and fantasized about bicycle racing in the olympics as a 5 year old. I never competed, but became an aggressive amateur. I was diagnosed with celiac 4.5 years ago. As I stated on the second thread on this forum, if I push it or cycle more than 1 hour and 15 minutes, I can be wiped out and unable to do much for 1 to 3 days. I had a Great Plains Labs organic acids urine test, and one of their recommendations was alpha ketoglutarate. I take L-Arginine Alpha KetoGlutarate an hour before bicycling, then a large shake before riding, and I can get away with pushing it a little for an hour and 10 minutes, but still cannot handle bicycling for 2 days in a row. Apparently I have an impaired krebbs cycle (getting energy into cells). In 2010, I was up to riding 5 days a week again. However, last year I did not do so well, and ended by only cycling 1 or 2 days a week. Live blood cell analysis this year revealed a huge red blood cell oxidation problem, in addition to the hemolytic anemia which I have been aware of for 14 years, which is continuing to abate. My doctor spent 4 hours writing an email to me regarding mitochondrial energy problem help, in which she recommended 11 new supplements, some of which I have not gotten yet, due to verifying gluten-free status. I don't consider this easy.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dani,

I should mention also that I have exhausted adrenals and need to take thyroid, despite normal thyroid labs, or I can easily "crash".

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dani –

I am a gymnast and can totally relate to the constant "should I keep going, or stop" type questions. I recently started talking methyl b12 lozenges (after my serum b12 came back low) and have noticed a HUGE difference in my muscle strength. I mean, like night and day difference! I don't have much advice as far as recovery goes because I still haven't figured it out myself, but I do suggest that you follow your body and stop... especially since you're still recovering from celiac/gluten intolerance! Or....

It seems like it would make sense to shorten the amount of time you cycle each day... or even if you do decide to go for an hour one day, you could try going for 10 min the next... just to get out, you know? That works for me sometimes. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,797
    • Total Posts
      932,511
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,283
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Michael McNamara
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Christiana, thanks for the reply. I am both interested in the outcome of this story for curiousity and for how it relates a bit to me,  Is your pain and pressure similar to the feeling of all your insides about to slide out onto the ground? It is similar to carrying a baby in the third trimester! I get this when I've been standing and walking for most of the day. There is also pain presenting in my Pelvic area, although I thought this was from a nerve cluster that was damaged during my hysterectomy . Is there anything you do about this? thanks again!
    • In comes SIBO Girl to join Captain NCGS   One other thought:  have you looked at the possibility of having small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO)?  The pain you are feeling may be related to bloating pressure, which, if it is caused by SIBO, would continue after the removal of gluten because lots of foods feed the bacteria in your small intestines once they have become established where they don't belong.   One of the things that is confusing about celiac/gluten sensitivity is that is causes so many other things. Anemia, for example. Remove the gluten you feel better, but you may still need to treat the anemia to make those anemia-specific symptoms go away. Same thing with B vitamin supplimentation (nod to Professor Pellagra) and some of the neurological symptoms. Same with bacteria in the small intestines.  Guten affects my daughter's nerves. These affect motility, which affect her body's ability to prevent bacterial overgrowth. The removal of gluten was key to eliminating most of her symptoms. But removing excessive fermentable carbs was important for the SIBO to be kept at bay. That's the Fodmap component (but not JUST Fodmaps).  Going grain free has been amazing for her health.   Here is the best website for SIBO. Just something to consider. http://www.siboinfo.com/symptoms.html Incidentaly, SIBO is very common in folks with gluten sensitivities. I personally think that everyone diagnose with celiac disease should also be tested for SIBO just like they test for vitamin deficiencies. It would probably greatly help in recovery if you treated that condition as well. 
    • No, I was gluten free both times I had a scope.  They found eosinaphalic esophagitis and most recently ulcers.  The ulcers were the cause of the nausea apparently. i feel pretty good most of the time if I take all my vitamins, avoid sugar and carbs and lean toward the AIP diet.  I then have a corn tortilla or popcorn with my dinner and it's enough carbs for good sleep.
    • It needed paragraphs 
    • Hi Victoria I hope you get some replies as some of these people are still on this board.   Is this something you are suffering from? I thought I'd just let you know that I had this very badly at diagnosis, and it went on and on for some time. I had pelvic u/s and also a precautionary sigmoidoscopy - all was clear.  In the end what really helped was giving up all dairy for a few weeks.  It pretty much stopped - I missed my dairy though, so reintroduced it. But it was good to know it was bloating that was causing it.   But the pain was also due to something else. I still get pain to the left of my groin/pelvis when I've been carrying heavy bags and doing a lot of walking.  I have an issue with my sacroiliac joint.  Look it up - it is a common problem for coeliacs.  The pain transfers to the front of the groin, and also to the buttocks.  If I touch my left sacroiliac joint now it is really tender.  But with it I have an accompanying feeling of pain and pressure in my left groin/pelvic area, which reminds me of the time when I was expecting a baby , a simliar type of pressure.   I hope you hear from others but maybe this will help? Cristiana
  • Upcoming Events