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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Tom O'bryan & Cyrex Laboratories
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21 posts in this topic

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Feral Boy    0

I've watched some youtube videos recently, and listened to some podcasts (undergroundwellness), by Tom O'Bryan. He's very well spoken - of course, he's working from a script - and seemingly very knowledgeable about gluten and its issues (vis-a-vis human health). However, I've gone to his website (thedr.com!), which is pretty sketchy, and there is very little info about his qualifications (he's associated with an unaccredited "university").

All other web references to him quote his own website's claim that he is "an internationally recognized speaker specializing in Gluten Sensitivity & Celiac Disease". His treatment protocol for gluten issues requires many proprietary supplements (that he sells, of course). A web search revealed no books that he's written, and thus there are no footnotes which might support his claims.

He's associated with Cyrex Labs, which is offering a novel testing protocol for gluten sensitivity, along with antigen cross reactions, etc. Unfortunately, there is very little additional info at the Cyrex site.

Everything about this screams "scam" yet I'm still intrigued. Has anyone here tried the Cyrex testing protocols? Or know anything more about this guy (other than his own claims)?

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rosetapper23    236

I have no experience with Cyrex Labs, but I know a number of people on this forum do. All I know about Dr. O'Bryan is that he has been a lead presenter at a number of national conferences of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America. I've heard him speak twice and have found his presentations to be very informative, and he cites studies. I'm not surprised that he hasn't written a book, since his supplement business would have to be halted because of a conflict of interest.

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Feral Boy    0

So... no one with any direct experience?

Thanks for your response, Rosetapper23. In his podcasts, O'Bryan does mention studies off-handedly, but how does one verify this info without details like the name of the study, its authors, etc. At one point he claims that a particular idea is supported by "18 thousand studies". Consider the logistics of making that claim.

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Adalaide    361

IMO chiropractors really have no business preaching or practicing medicine. They don't have a medical degree but frequently make claims that imply they do. I have, for as long as I can remember, called the quack-er-practors because for all the claims they make, they're frequently quacks. (Not saying there aren't good and responsible ones, just that all I've encountered have been a little over the top.) Just to underscore how dangerous they can be, a chiropractor in Utah was recently arrested and had his license revoked as a result of his claims to be able to cure diabetes. The program he was using was developed by another chiropractor from Colorado who is also in hot water. It's been my experience that chiropractors are today's snake oil salesmen, offering up miracle cures for chronic lifelong illnesses. Desperate for a way out since all medical knowledge tells us we'll live with X or Y or Z the rest of our lives, we buy into the pitch only to find ourselves still sick but a little lighter in the pocket.

As to Tom O'Bryan specifically, there is no way I'd trust anyone who is making reference to studies "off-handedly" as feral put it, leaving us no way to check up on their information or sources. On top of that he's using those unsubstantiated claims to sell stuff. He goes down in my book as 110% sketchy.

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IrishHeart    1,633

It's up to you if you want to pay for "tests" that have no scientific or peer-reviewed studies to support them.

We have discussed this cross-reactivity thing on here MANY TIMES. No proof, no evidence to support it. (there is a study about dairy and cross-reactivity that was done, that's it)

He is selling a product.

He's a chiropractor.

He's a high paid guest speaker.

And he has associations with other chiropractors who also "treat" people for food intolerances.

(My chiropractor rolls his eyes at all this baloney.)

The vast majority of us think it's a scam.

If celiacs were suffering from "cross-reactivity" don't you think the top celiac researchers would be joining in and urging us all to be tested by Cyrex Labs and singing his praises in the published and peer-reviewed medical literature??

I have not found any, I have looked, but if it happens, I'll be the first one to apologize and tell him he is a genius.

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IrishHeart    1,633

Here is an example from the Cyrex website:

"Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors

Leading•Advancing•Promoting

Toronto, Ontario

November 12-14, 2010

Case Study Results Show Importance of Array 4 Testing

Reaching across the border, Cyrex Laboratories traveled to Canada for the Ontario Association of Naturopathic Doctors (OAND) convention and tradeshow November 12-14, 2010. This year’s theme, “Cracking the Chronic Disease Epidemic,” prompted OAND to invite Cyrex’s Scientific Consultant, Aristo Vojdani, Ph.D. to deliver a keynote lecture to more than 400 attendees. Dr. Vojdani presented, “From Immunity to Autoimmunity: Preventing the Onset of Chronic Disease.” During his lecture, he showed the results of his in-house studies that inspired the development of the arrays offered by Cyrex.

The most compelling case was that of a patient who had undergone root canal and dental implant work. Within 60 days, the patient went from having a healthy gut with no food sensitivities, to a patient with severe intestinal permeability and multiple food intolerances. The combination of emotional stress and the prescribed antibiotics, pain medication, and antacids contributed to the clinical conditions. The “before” and “after” results apparently surprised the audience. The patient’s improved test results, after the implementation of a tailored diet─based on Gluten-Associated Sensitivity and Cross-Reative Foods from Cyrex’s Array 4─seemed to convince practitioners of the importance of Cyrex’s next-generation testing services, according to a company spokesperson."

"seemed to convince practitioners"...of what?

"according to a company spokesman"....where's the science? the peer-reviewed literature??

This is a PR statement!

Seriously? If you take a sustained course of probiotics after being doused with antibiotics, your gut flora will balance out and you'll feel better. If you avoid foods that irritate your gut, you'll feel better.

I say that all the time on here. Many of us say the same thing: Every celiac should be on probiotics. Our guts need them.

"Severe intestinal permeability"-- this condition can be diagnosed by a doctor through testing, if that is your concern.

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TomC    0

I bought his DVD and sort of feel ripped off. It had okay information but I was completely turned off by how many times he pushes for people to buy the products on his website.Although I think the supplements he recommends helped me...Long before I heard of him I had been taking omega 3 fish oil, L glutamine and probiotics. Not his brand obviously. I was seriously wondering about the labs he speaks up but if the people on this forum feel its a scam then Ill probably pass.

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Hellothere    0

He apparently is an "advisor" to cyrex labs.

BTW, cyrex labs came very highly recommended to me by my neighbor, who is an M.D. Who used them for himself.

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BleuPhire    1

I did the saliva test and the cross-reactives blood test. I know a few other people who did also. My results are below. I have been gluten free for 3 months and feel a major change. I will keep y'all posted on how it goes after I cut out all the other stuff. I'm going to talk to my chiro this morning about all of it.

Many people self-dx and many people have trusted Enterolabs. Sometimes help comes in different forms. My daughter's pedi GI told me that one child was pos blood but neg biopsy so she didn't need to be gluten-free. Most of what I've read says that the child should be. Her pedi didn't even do the right blood test.

Med dr.'s are still learning, too.

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IrishHeart    1,633

In his podcasts, O'Bryan does mention studies off-handedly, but how does one verify this info without details like the name of the study, its authors, etc. At one point he claims that a particular idea is supported by "18 thousand studies". Consider the logistics of making that claim.

You are very wise to wonder about such claims.

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jka8168    1

I haven't seen the Vojdani/Cyrex tests fail yet, meaning specifically the saliva and gluten related blood test used together in order to check the most possible gluten related antibodies. Array 1 and Array #3 I have seen some very very sick people finally get their positive gluten syndrome diagnosis with these tests after numerous other false negative tests.

Dr. O'Bryan's research reviews are just that. Research reviews. Hundreds of articles from mainstream journals. Some are pretty helpful and informative.

No financial interest.

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rosetapper23    236

I'd like to add, too, that Dr. O'Bryan provided everyone at the conferences where I heard him speak with his e-mail address so that if we wished further information, we could ask for it. I wrote him and specifically asked for information about a study he'd discussed, and he provided the information to me. Unfortunately, that was over five years ago, so I don't have the slightest idea where I put the information....but I remember being impressed that he took the time to get back to me. I really didn't get the impression that he was a scammer at all.

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docseigler    0

It's up to you if you want to pay for "tests" that have no scientific or peer-reviewed studies to support them.

We have discussed this cross-reactivity thing on here MANY TIMES. No proof, no evidence to support it. (there is a study about dairy and cross-reactivity that was done, that's it)

I have not found any, I have looked, but if it happens, I'll be the first one to apologize and tell him he is a genius.

 

No evidence you say?

 

 

 

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admin    195

Please explain how these citations relate to the topic at hand--they do not mention Cyrex labs and the reliability of their tests. Looking at the titles, many seem to be about allergies and have nothing obviously related to Cyrex Labs' " cross- reactive" tests.

 

Scott

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kareng    1,992

No evidence you say? ]

Yes, we still say that. Your links appear to be about allergies. If you are a doctor, as your " name" suggests, you know that Celiac disease is not an allergy.

The topic was about the reliability of a company that says it will take your money to run tests, such as for gluten sensitivity or Celiac " cross- reactive foods". Currently, there are no medically approved tests for this. The " cross- reactive" foods in Celiac theory has no reliable data at this time.

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VERY curious as to whether anyone has taken the Cross-reaction (#4) Array test from Cyrex Labs?

I've taken it twice upon the recommendation of my alternative medical practicioner. It is used to discover "cross-reactives," foods which your body treats as eating gluten. Here's a good explanation of it: http://www.thepaleomom.com/2013/03/gluten-cross-reactivity-update-how-your-body-can-still-think-youre-eating-gluten-even-after-giving-it-up.html

 

The results of the #4 Array test came in positive for several foods, which I had substantially reduced. I am now planning on abstainng from them as I do from gluten. (Since I lack outward symptoms, I don't have the same immediacy of motivation as those of you who react awefully.)

 

A little background: My gastroenterologist is close to labeling my condition as refractory sprue. Antibody tests over the last 18 months show that I successfully avoid gluten. So my thinking is that the cross-reactives may the problem. I'll see the results when I take another antibody test in the futre.

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kareng    1,992

6 months later, the accepted medical/ research still says the same thing:

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/whats-with-all-the-talk-about-certain-types-of-food-causing-cross-reactivity

"What’s with all the talk about certain types of food causing “cross-reactivity?”

There is not yet reliable data about cross-reactivity. As for the alleged possibility that many gluten-free foods or drinks (such as coffee, milk, orange juice, etc.) would trigger symptoms in celiac individuals due to hidden antigens mimicking gluten or cross-reacting with anti-gluten antibodies, it must be clearly stated that this is all false information, devoid of any scientific basis, and must be rejected as untrue."

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Personally, a chiropractor saved my life with their supplements.  They can be trained in nutrition.  My orthostatic blood pressure would dive bomb before the supplements, after taking them it went back to a normal curve.  Doctors (of any kind) are in business to make money.  How come we point at chiropractors and make this their downfall?  I think it better to treat with carefully selected nutrients (which tend to build health) rather than drugs that have harmful side effects. 

 

.  Dr. Thomas O'Bryan, DC, CCN, DACBN.

1.  DC:   Doctor of chiropractic

2. CCN:   Clinical Nutrition Post graduate study http://www.cncb.org/  The link shows requirement for this degree.

3. DACBN:   Diplomate of the American Chiropractic  Board of Nutrition   I noticed it required atleast two years of nutrition work. https://sites.google.com/site/michigannutritionassociation/impact/diplomates-of-the-american-clinical-board-of-nutrition-dacbn  The link lists requirements for such a degree.

 

I am noticing too that the Gluten Free Summit associated with Tom O'Bryan  is supporting this celiac forum! 

 

How much training does an MD receive in nutrition, and aren't celiac problems mostly treated by acquiring appropriate nutrition?

 

I have no personal experience with Dr. O'Brian, but have had experience with others that have helped me immensely, but are slammed as scammers here on this forum.

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Gemini    785

Personally, a chiropractor saved my life with their supplements.  They can be trained in nutrition.  My orthostatic blood pressure would dive bomb before the supplements, after taking them it went back to a normal curve.  Doctors (of any kind) are in business to make money.  How come we point at chiropractors and make this their downfall?  I think it better to treat with carefully selected nutrients (which tend to build health) rather than drugs that have harmful side effects. 

 

.  Dr. Thomas O'Bryan, DC, CCN, DACBN.

1.  DC:   Doctor of chiropractic

2. CCN:   Clinical Nutrition Post graduate study http://www.cncb.org/  The link shows requirement for this degree.

3. DACBN:   Diplomate of the American Chiropractic  Board of Nutrition   I noticed it required atleast two years of nutrition work. https://sites.google.com/site/michigannutritionassociation/impact/diplomates-of-the-american-clinical-board-of-nutrition-dacbn  The link lists requirements for such a degree.

 

I am noticing to that the Gluten Free Summit is supporting the forum!

 

How much training does an MD receive in nutrition, and aren't celiac problems mostly treated by acquiring appropriate nutrition?

Chiropractors are doctors who go to school almost as long as an internist.  They just are specilaized in muscle and bone. I have one who is a Godsend and has helped me out of a jam many times.  He is also pretty well versed in nutrition but the difference is that he does not push any supplements on me. He does sell some but never acts as a salesman when I have an appointment.  He also does not align himself with any wishy washy labs, like Cyrex. His main goal is make your problem go away, using good chiropractic techniques.

 

As of yet, there is no proof whatsoever that other foods are seen as gluten-like and "cross react". Most people with undiagnosed Celiac or GS are suffering from a food issue already and other foods will bother them for awhile. It has nothing to do with gluten. If people want to waste their time and money on this stuff, this is a free country and they can. That's why scams are so prevalent today.....there are too many people who do not learn as much as they can about their condition and the right way to treat it, so make the mistake of believing someone who is nothing more than a salesman. I like chiropractors and think they serve a great purpose, like any other good doctor, but not those who prey on sick people looking for a quick cure to their problems by taking a million supplements and having tests done that have no merit whatsoever.  There is no test for gluten sensitivity, at least not yet. I would trust a chiro for nutritional advice regarding muscle and bone but for autoimmune issues, not so much. Unless, of course, my chiro had Celiac Disease. :)

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