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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Who Really Should Not Eat Gluten.
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9 posts in this topic

http://mainefarmsforthefuture.com/who-really-shouldnt-eat-gluten

In part -

“Confusion about gluten sensitivity has been rampant,” says Alessio Fasano, director of the University of Maryland’s Center for Celiac Research and a co-author of the proposal, published this week in the journal BMC Medicine. “That prompted a few of us to say, ‘Let’s put some facts on the table to assess what’s known and what’s not known.’ “

The proposal—partly supported by a maker of gluten-free products, Italy’s Dr. Schär AG—also spells out diagnostic criteria to help physicians determine which, if any, disorder a patient suffers from. “It is well possible that many individuals are on a gluten-free diet for no sound medical reasons,” the authors note.

The American Gastroenterological Association says that much more needs to be known about gluten sensitivity before official guidelines can be devised—including how many people suffer from it and to what degree.

About 1% of people in the U.S. have celiac disease, a fourfold increase over the past 50 years. Some gastroenterologists say that for every patient with celiac disease, they see six to eight who have the same symptoms, but without the tell-tale antibodies or intestinal damage needed to confirm celiac.

Evidence is mounting that gluten sensitivity does exist. Dr. Fasano and colleagues last year compared blood samples and intestinal biopsies from people with suspected gluten sensitivity to those with confirmed celiac disease and healthy controls, and found distinct differences in each.

And in a study published last year, researchers in Australia showed in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that subjects with suspected gluten sensitivity had substantially fewer symptoms on a gluten-free diet than control subjects who unknowingly ingested gluten.

“Many physicians would roll their eyes and say, ‘God, another crazy person with food sensitivities,’ ” says Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University and a co-author of the proposal. “It’s only now that studies are coming out showing that there’s something real about gluten sensitivity.” In fact, he notes that patients with gluten sensitivity often have even more severe symptoms than those with celiac disease, which is frequently “silent” or asymptomatic, even though antibodies to gluten are slowly damaging their intestinal tracts. That’s partly why celiac disease is underdiagnosed, he says.

Confusing the picture further are private labs that offer tests of stool or saliva that they say can definitively diagnose gluten sensitivity. Experts say that such tests haven’t been validated and shouldn’t be relied on for a diagnosis. “If anyone claims they have a test that is specifically for gluten sensitivity, there is no such thing, though I’m not ruling it out.(in the future).

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Good stuff, Lisa! Thanks for sharing. :)

Very interesting that Peter Green notes that gluten sensitivity can be more severe as far as symptoms than celiac.

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It's also good to know that research is ongoing for better diagnostic methods.

Yeah, I thought it was a good article.

And....

Confusing the picture further are private labs that offer tests of stool or saliva that they say can definitively diagnose gluten sensitivity. Experts say that such tests haven’t been validated and shouldn’t be relied on for a diagnosis. “If anyone claims they have a test that is specifically for gluten sensitivity, there is no such thing, though I’m not ruling it out.(in the future).

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Me, Nora, Researchmomma and the other folks on the board who read the peer-reviewed literature and explain over and over that fecal/salivary testing is unreliable weren't enough? :blink:

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Me, Nora, Researchmomma and the other folks on the board who read the peer-reviewed literature and explain over and over that fecal/salivary testing is unreliable weren't enough? :blink:

I think people are hungry for answers, and willing to pay for that affirmation. :( But, as mentioned in the article, I wonder how many people are on the gluten free diet, who do not need to be.

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I think people are hungry for answers, and willing to pay for that affirmation. :( But, as mentioned in the article, I wonder how many people are on the gluten free diet, who do not need to be.

Not as many as doctors think :ph34r:

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I think people are hungry for answers, and willing to pay for that affirmation. :( But, as mentioned in the article, I wonder how many people are on the gluten free diet, who do not need to be.

I find the posts from people who can eat bread in Europe and not in the US extremely interesting. There may be a lot more people reacting to GMO grains than we realize.

There is too much emphasis on "diagnosis" in this country and too little actual healing. Companies are victimizing people who have unknowingly bought into the Western medical emphasis on diagnosis. It drives me crazy and hopefully I've saved some people around here a few hundred dollars on needless testing that they can spend on their families or on something that makes them happy.

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I find the posts from people who can eat bread in Europe and not in the US extremely interesting. There may be a lot more people reacting to GMO grains than we realize.

I find it interesting that my big three reactions are to wheat, corn and soy :unsure:

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I find it interesting that my big three reactions are to wheat, corn and soy :unsure:

Wow, yeah. I hope you are getting organic, non-GMO rice.

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    • Hello and welcome First, sorry to hear you're not feeling well. Myself and many others here can empathise and I know how desperate you will be to simply feel well. You may need to delay that just a little bit longer however: Maybe? It's impossible to answer because the test is looking for antibodies created by the immune system and different people's immune systems react differently. You may test positive as Jen says and go on to the next stage, because an endoscopy is the usual last part of the process, or you may test negative and be left wondering if you'd only stayed eating gluten longer would it be different. Doctors like to try to play it safe which is why they insist on a gluten challenge period where you are definitely having gluten each day.  It gets more confusing. You may be like me, finding all these symptoms that seem to relate to consuming gluten but then testing negative for celiac. This could mean Non Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) for which there is no test or it could mean you needed a longer challenge. I did 6 weeks and couldnt face any longer, sometimes I wonder if I'd done 8 would I have got a different result? Although I had been strictly gluten free before then so perhaps not a good comparison.  I think you need to use this time to push for an answer and know that once testing is over, whatever the results, you can give the gluten free diet a proper try. You do have the option of speaking to your doctor and asking for an earlier test, but you may have to pay for that and if its negative you may want to stay on gluten to complete the challenge period for a more definitive answer. Best of luck!   
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