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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Using Otc Anti-Itch Cream On Dh
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I have this rash that appears very much like DH, but I have not been diagnosed. I know that persons with gluten intolerance and/or Celiac can be prone to other skin conditions such as exzema.

SO, today at the store I got some exzema cream to try on it, in case it might work. If I do in fact have DH, will it hurt anything to put OTC exzema cream on it? Should I or should I not do this?

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Some people have reported good itch relief using Orajel. The stuff for toothaches. It has a skin numbing ingredient that helps with the itch.

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I can't imagine that using any approved medication will have any negative effect on someone with DH (unless it has gluten or iodine in it, debatably-not everyone has the same reaction to topical gluten or iodine).

And probably not much positive effect either.

People have success with various creams, etc to help with symptoms, but nothing to my knowledge has any effect on the malady itself.

For me, anything that keeps the skin moistened definitely helps.

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I've had some luck with the Whole Foods mint lotion combined with aloe, apple cider vinegar, organic extra virgin coconut oil and clear calamine lotion. I soak in a tub with the aloe, acv, evco. Then I make a paste out of the mint lotion and calamine. This has been the result of 7 months of trial and error. Also, I've used the orajel but the tubes are so small!

Another thing I've been practicing for the last couple days is called "tapping" or

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Ryniev,

Can you pass on the link for the ebook?

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"I can't imagine that using any approved medication will have any negative effect on someone with DH"

OK thanks, I was concerned that if I put the wrong thing on it, it could irritate the DH or make it worse. That doesn't seem to be the case. At least no one has said it happened to them as of yet.

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As to my experience there is nothing you put ON the dh that makes it either better OR worse. Unless maybe you rubbed gluten directly into it. And I doubt anyone would willingly try that to find out what happens.

You can use things that help the itching but that's about it.

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As to my experience there is nothing you put ON the dh that makes it either better OR worse. Unless maybe you rubbed gluten directly into it. And I doubt anyone would willingly try that to find out what happens.

You can use things that help the itching but that's about it.

Ditto this. Before I found out what it might be...I tried cortizone cream, antifungal cream, 2 types...then I finally saw a dermatologist who vaguely dianosed it as stress induced excema and gave me the strongest steroid cream they have...and all that did was slow the turn over rate on it...and made it itch hurt SO much WORSE!

I have found keeping lotion on it, seems to help my skin from cracking so much.

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The only things I've noticed are that 1) steroids may reduce it but stops it from healing completely 2) anything astringent or scented seems to irritate mine, but that could be because that stuff tends to irritate my skin anyway.

Lotions help - I prefer Vanicream, and Dove unscented products work ( I mean the ones that don't smell at all - the unscented body wash has a scent that turns me green).

I've had a spot on my finger lately - unsure what it is - but it does better if I cover it with some shea butter/olive oil salve and a bandaid.

I think everyone here may react to some otc product - we all seem to have slightly different sensitivities. If you find one that works for you stick with it.

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Benzocaine products work for the pain, sting and itch.

Walgreens Pain Relieving Ointment

Solarcaine

Bactine

They only work temporarily but sometimes it is a great relief.

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Doesn't the prescription Dapsone that I've read about even work?

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Read these threads all the way through. Check out Dapsone thoroughly before you jump on it. Be aware of what you take & what it may do to you both good & bad. Believe me, I wish there were magic for this beast. Personally, I wouldn't touch Dapsone with a 10 ft. pole even though I am a squirmingitch! AND even if I didn't have a sulfa allergy.

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/80271-sulfa-allergy-no-dapsone/

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/78001-oxygen-levels-and-dapsone-and-dh/

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/86903-dapsone/

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/68551-tired-of-dapsone/

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