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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Feeling Fantastic
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so sorry it has been a while since i have been here

i have been feeling fantastic these past few weeks

i have never looked so good either

i have droped 67 lbs and im now at my body weight for my hight 135

now i went through hell to get here

but it all changed

when i cut out all grains and cereal family foods along

basically i eat grain free lactose free nightshade free soy free

for morning i drink one glass of green smoothie and take one with me

2 big leaves kale 2 leaves romaine lettuce chia seeds about 2 pinches

pear and apple sauce and blend

yesterday i put mango in place of the pear

then i take something for lunch today it was qunioa flour almond flour herbmare chives onion flakes mixed that with chunked up boneless chicken breasts and baked and then made sweet potato fryes oh yummm hubby loved them

the other day i did a grain free pancake recpie useing almond flour eggs soda coconut sugar in a muffin tin just pour enough to coat the bottom then drop in supposed to be sauage did not have any so i put cooked chicken and baccon on top then poured rest of the pancake mixture on top works great if you do your batter in a blender then baked at 350 for 20 min it was great to take to work

then i got this great recpie im in love with grain free carob muffins omg to die for they taste like a cross between chcolate cake and brownie

i use coconut oil all the time for everything

my sweetners are coconut sugar and honey and sometimes a bit of agave if i run out but only use it if recpie calls for a couple of tbs if it goes into cups i use honey

now mind you if i try and say oh well a bit of this or that wont hurt it does so i am super strict with what i eat

i process my own coconut flour and milk open them up with a cork screw works wonders the pull down kind and then take it to a piece of cement like the basement stair and it cracks open nicely

im so happy i finally figured out what i can and can not eat

i also have been doing oil pulling i think that helps alot too

i highly recomend oil pulling

now that the brain fog is gone i can now go and get my licence and i am now learning a new job as an aprentance to a upholstery shop working monday - friday 9-5 its wonderful i love it so much and learning alot

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Wow congratulations figuring all that out! :confettithrowingface:

Awesome to hear how fantastic you feel. :)

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That's awesome! And I love your idea about the pancake batter in a muffin tin with sausage (or whatever). I'm so going to try it! Another one I saw, but haven't tried yet; from a show called 'Sara's weeknight meals' is to line a muffin tin with a slice of ham, drop in an egg and put on some grated cheese and bake until the egg is set. I don't remember how long she baked it, and maybe using scrambled egg would be better so it's not really over cooked in order to cook the yolk. But it's another one I'm going to try, to cut down on carbs and have something made ahead that I can just warm up for lunch or breakfast.

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O M G!!! Colleen--that's FANTASTIC !! I have been wondering how you are doing. You stopped writing posts and I didn't want to bug you!

You really struggled for a while for there and I worried about you so much!

You did it!! yaaaay!

I knew you could do it. I couldn't be more happy for you!!! :)

hugs,

IH

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I love these stories.

So here is mine..

I'm a single mum to a loving a tender 9y/o. Been overweight most of my 39 years. Today I am 65 kg (143pounds for our US readers). My dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is still head to toe but milder and mostly healing.

I started getting the 'look' from men about 2-3 months ago. Now I am seeing a very gentlemanly man who describes my DH as being so strange given 'how beautiful the inside is'. In hindsight I think gluten has given me so much grief in so many ways that I can't now fathom that life can be good and happy. It makes my head spin. Can people be this content?

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In hindsight I think gluten has given me so much grief in so many ways that I can't now fathom that life can be good and happy. It makes my head spin. Can people be this content?

Yes, we can! :)

and good for you, Diana--enjoy your steady progress towards good health!

I'm am like you, happy to be healing, although my progress is very slow. I have stopped mourning what was lost to this disease and focus on what lies before me.

FWIW, from all I have learned from people with severe DH, it does die down in time. I know how maddening it is. Hang in there, hon!

Best to you, IH

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