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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Soy Lecithin...?
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16 posts in this topic

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Cujy    1

Can we have it?? What is it? We can't have soy right? Sorry for my ignorance but Im still trying to desperately learn! Just ate some MM's and I hope to God I didn't just gluten myself!!! :unsure:

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alex11602    75

Soy lecithin is derived from soy which Celiacs can have from a gluten perspective. Of course you could be intolerant to soy, but as far as gluten goes it is not a concern.

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sa1937    324

I don't avoid soy lecithin and as far as I know, I don't have any problem with it. While I am well aware that some people have serious problems with soy, I don't buy products based on soy like tofu or soy flour as I figure I just don't need them.

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Skylark    935

There are links to safe and unsafe ingredients at http://celiac.com. Here is the safe list, and as you can see soy lecithin is on it. http://www.celiac.com/articles/181/1/Safe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Safe-Ingredients/Page1.html

This is the UNSAFE list so you know what to look out for. To be honest I find it easier to mostly avoid processed foods. Reading long ingredient labels is confusing and if you make a mistake you gluten yourself.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/182/1/Unsafe-Gluten-Free-Food-List-Unsafe-Ingredients/Page1.html

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PennyH    0

This was written in 2011 on the Livestrong website but raises concerns to me. Does anyone have any more info on this?

Soy, or soya, lecithin is a gluten-free food because it is not made from wheat, rye or barley. While soy lecithin by itself does not contain gluten, additives to lecithin may contain gluten. Consumers must do their own research into ingredients and gluten content, which can sometimes be confusing.

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Rchelpka    0

I'm  relatively newly diagnosed Celiac. My understanding of the whole Soy issue is that while Soy itself does not contain gluten, it is often suspect due to the high likelihood of cross contamination. This is due to the fact that most Soy growers also grow Wheat, Barley and Rye in rotation with their Soy crops. This means the soils are contaminated with the gluten containing grains and the equipment used to harvest and process the Soy is shared with the other gluten containing grains. So, the bottom line is, it's pretty much a crap shoot with Soy unless the product containing the Soy is specifically labeled gluten free. This would and should imply that the Soy used in the product is grown independently and isolated from other gluten containing grains.  

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notme!    287

no, dude, you are thinking of oats.  i have an independent soy sensitivity and if i have a reaction it lasts maybe 24 hrs.  i know it doesn't contain gluten because i would be knocked down for 2 weeks.  

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Rchelpka    0

Thanks Arlene! However, a very short Google search using the string "Soy Wheat Rotation" yielded hundreds of articles about crop rotations including wheat, soy, corn and the list goes on. In fact, One short info article from Ohio State University http://ohioline.osu.edu/iwy/croprota.html recommends planting wheat following soy. It would appear there is nothing truly safe as far as crops go as it seems to be a largely common practice to rotate wheat with just about any other crop. Guess we Celiacs should just stop eating period! :-) Does anyone else out there know if wheat crop rotation is really a concern for those suffering from Celiac disease?

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notme!    287

so, once every 3 years, wheat is planted.  i suppose, the weather and the rest of the year take care of any excess wheat - also whatever likes to eat wheat would take care of what is left - after all, that is what the point to crop rotation is anyway, right?  and corn and soybeans are self contained so the wheat (theoretically, if there even was any to begin with) would be washed off when the kernels or beans were washed.  

 

but, i am not a farmer.  i am a celiac who eats corn and soy and gets no gluten reaction from either :)  i got enough worries, i don't need to borrow any ;)

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Among many things, soy is a product that is not good for people avoiding gluten. the protein in soy is so similar to that of gluten that your body reacts the same way with it. Also, soy is not as healthy as people had once thought. It increases the risk for breast cancer and is genetically modified...among many other reasons why we shouldn't eat it. I avoid it all together, but it is very hard because it is in ALOT of foods.

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kareng    1,992

Among many things, soy is a product that is not good for people avoiding gluten. the protein in soy is so similar to that of gluten that your body reacts the same way with it. .

This is not true. There is no scientific evidence of this. Soy does bother some people, Celiacs or not.

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Celtic Queen    33

I believe it's not the crop rotation that is an issue with wheat/oats.  It's the fact that they are usually grown next to each other at the same time.  And they are often processed in the same facility.

 

I live in a state where large amounts of soybeans are grown.  Where I live, almost no wheat is grown.  Soy may be rotated with corn or cotton here.  Not sure if it's the same in other parts of the country.

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luvrdeo    1

soooo....is the gum I'm chewing - both kinds with soy lecithin on the label - gonna get me?  For whatever reason I decided to read what all was in my gum, looked up the soy l - and of course was brought back to my favorite celiac board :)

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kareng    1,992

soooo....is the gum I'm chewing - both kinds with soy lecithin on the label - gonna get me?  For whatever reason I decided to read what all was in my gum, looked up the soy l - and of course was brought back to my favorite celiac board :)

 

 

Maybe if you have a problem with soy.  Wouldn't be a gluten issue.

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