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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Thyroid Problems
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15 posts in this topic

What do you keep your TSH level at? I know there are new ranges and I am just wondering if other go by the new ranges or the old ranges and if so, how do you feel?

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Tsh ranges fluctuate, so I just kind of get what I get.

Most good docs want it around the 1's.

My ND monitors free t3/t4 and prescribes my rx by those levels. My other doc watched tsh and wanted it down from 5's to 1's regardless of t3/t4.

Last time tsh was 8+, which was an all-time high but t3/t4 was on spot. We don't really know what happened on that one. I'm on a decent dose of rx now - doubling it to drop tsh (which may drop anyway) was a bit extreme, we thought. I'm in a wait-and-see pattern.

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I have had problems with my Doctors and labs still using the old tsh ranges. I know what I feel the best at and it is 2 or below. They have had me so up and down taking me off my meds for 6mths. They Just put me back on them because I was right at 5. I wish all the doctors would adjust to the new ranges and I wouldn't have been miserable for 6mths or longer with all the symptoms. I have been gluten free almost 4mths now so I am Hoping it will keep my levels from fluctuating so much

Good luck :)

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What do you keep your TSH level at? I know there are new ranges and I am just wondering if other go by the new ranges or the old ranges and if so, how do you feel?

It's a little-known secret that TSH can vary several points during the day. I do not manage my thyroid by TSH but by symptoms, and Free Thyroid Hormone levels. I am generally suppressed, with a TSH averaging .03.

TSH is NOT a thyroid hormone and if you are taking thyroid meds your docs should manage your dose using Free T3 and Free T4 because the supplemented hormone messes up the TSH-thyroid gland feedback loop. T3 and T4 are the main thyroid hormones your body needs (there are others but T3 and T4 are most prominent).

T4 is the "reserve" hormone which is stripped of an iodine atom to create T3. T3 is the active form of hormone picked up by receptors to be used by your cells.

I do not feel well with my TSH even in the "new normal" ranges. If my TSH goes up to 2.0 or over, I feel lousy.

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It's a little-known secret that TSH can vary several points during the day. I do not manage my thyroid by TSH but by symptoms, and Free Thyroid Hormone levels. I am generally suppressed, with a TSH averaging .03.

TSH is NOT a thyroid hormone and if you are taking thyroid meds your docs should manage your dose using Free T3 and Free T4 because the supplemented hormone messes up the TSH-thyroid gland feedback loop. T3 and T4 are the main thyroid hormones your body needs (there are others but T3 and T4 are most prominent).

T4 is the "reserve" hormone which is stripped of an iodine atom to create T3. T3 is the active form of hormone picked up by receptors to be used by your cells.

I do not feel well with my TSH even in the "new normal" ranges. If my TSH goes up to 2.0 or over, I feel lousy.

my labcorp score is 3.47. I really know nothing about thyroid issues but I will be getting a test soon for t4 and t3 and reverse t3 so I don't know what those scores are yet. any help here would be much appreciated.

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my labcorp score is 3.47. I really know nothing about thyroid issues but I will be getting a test soon for t4 and t3 and reverse t3 so I don't know what those scores are yet. any help here would be much appreciated.

3.47 is over the new recommended range of 0.5-2.5 or 3.0. I bet you're tired. I feel bad if my TSH is over 2.0 and that's "normal".

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my labcorp score is 3.47. I really know nothing about thyroid issues but I will be getting a test soon for t4 and t3 and reverse t3 so I don't know what those scores are yet. any help here would be much appreciated.

I agree with Skylark. Your TSH is a little higher than the level at which most thyroid patients report feeling okay. Hopefully your T3 and T4 tests will be revealing.

It is good that your doctor is looking at your reverse T3. Docs don't usually do that. Reverse T3 is created when the "wrong" iodine atom is stripped from the T4 molecule, and the chemical structure looks like a mirror image of the regular T3. What happens then is, the thyroid receptors in your cells don't recognize it and can't use it for metabolism. Kind of like a polarized electrical plug that can only go into the receptacle one way.

When your body does this, and it can do it for many reasons, you have "thyroid hormone resistance". Too many docs won't even acknowledge the condition exists. It causes you to feel hypothyroid even with normal lab numbers, and will get you a diagnosis like "fibromyalgia" if you are lucky, "all in your head" or "it can't be your thyroid,your TSH is normal" if you are not lucky.

You don't want to look at the straight RT3 number, rather you want to look at your reverse T3 ratio. That is found by dividing your T3 measurement by your reverse T3 measurement. If your T3 is a "total T3" (the lab sheet will tell you) your ratio should be around 10 or less. If your T3 is the "free T3" you will want a ratio of 20 or less.

EDITED TO ADD: Be sure the T3 and Reverse T3 you are using in your calculation are using the same unit of measurement or your numbers won't work! And be sure they are using results from the same blood draw.

There are many reasons the body creates reverse T3, it's pretty complicated. You can Google it and find out more. If you have it, there is a Yahoo group that could be some help.

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I agree with Skylark. Your TSH is a little higher than the level at which most thyroid patients report feeling okay. Hopefully your T3 and T4 tests will be revealing.

It is good that your doctor is looking at your reverse T3. Docs don't usually do that. Reverse T3 is created when the "wrong" iodine atom is stripped from the T4 molecule, and the chemical structure looks like a mirror image of the regular T3. What happens then is, the thyroid receptors in your cells don't recognize it and can't use it for metabolism. Kind of like a polarized electrical plug that can only go into the receptacle one way.

When your body does this, and it can do it for many reasons, you have "thyroid hormone resistance". Too many docs won't even acknowledge the condition exists. It causes you to feel hypothyroid even with normal lab numbers, and will get you a diagnosis like "fibromyalgia" if you are lucky, "all in your head" or "it can't be your thyroid,your TSH is normal" if you are not lucky.

You don't want to look at the straight RT3 number, rather you want to look at your reverse T3 ratio. That is found by dividing your T3 measurement by your reverse T3 measurement. If your T3 is a "total T3" (the lab sheet will tell you) your ratio should be around 10 or less. If your T3 is the "free T3" you will want a ratio of 20 or less.

EDITED TO ADD: Be sure the T3 and Reverse T3 you are using in your calculation are using the same unit of measurement or your numbers won't work! And be sure they are using results from the same blood draw.

There are many reasons the body creates reverse T3, it's pretty complicated. You can Google it and find out more. If you have it, there is a Yahoo group that could be some help.

thanks for your information, it seems my doctor (functional medicine) mentioned what you mentioned here about ratios. My testosterone has gone steadily down over the last several months. I had gained alot of weight and my bone density is low, plus I have low ferritin.

my doctor gave me Calcium D-Glucarate and Thyroid Synergy by a company called Designs for Health ( I am not employed by them) to help me. Fatigue, low energy, irrational fears, anxiety, weight gain. this must all be thyroid related. I am hoping I can bring down estrogen and feel better or the next step is bio identical HRT.

and yes skylark, I am tired. I work 2 jobs and I am completely wiped out every day. I almost sometimes wonder if I can make it through the days anymore. I just wanna sleep or rest on the couch. I am glad I lost 16 pounds by cutting out most carbs so I at least feel better that i can fit into my jeans now!! Funny because the endocrinologist I went to said nothing about my TSH numbers being too high, it was my function medicine internist who did not like the numbers and took action. Celiac is far reaching in the body, wow.

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My TSH level is always below 1. My doctor does not really look at TSH, but looks at the Free T3 and Free T4 numbers. I feel best when my Free T3 is towards the upper end of the range and my Free T4 is towards the middle.

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My TSH level is always below 1. My doctor does not really look at TSH, but looks at the Free T3 and Free T4 numbers. I feel best when my Free T3 is towards the upper end of the range and my Free T4 is towards the middle.

I am wondering why my TSH has consistently been 3.47 and the endocrinologist NEVER said there was anything wrong with that number?? Is it because I am a male?

it sounds like a stupid rhetorical question, but I am stumped. In fact, NONE of my doctors, GI, or GP ever said anything about it. The only one who raised a flag was my integrated medicine internist. I just always assumed since the number was below 4 on the labcorp range I was ok....

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I am wondering why my TSH has consistently been 3.47 and the endocrinologist NEVER said there was anything wrong with that number?? Is it because I am a male?

it sounds like a stupid rhetorical question, but I am stumped. In fact, NONE of my doctors, GI, or GP ever said anything about it. The only one who raised a flag was my integrated medicine internist. I just always assumed since the number was below 4 on the labcorp range I was ok....

It's not just because you're male. They do it to everybody.

I would say they're less likely to even test it if you're male, though...

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It's not just because you're male. They do it to everybody.

I would say they're less likely to even test it if you're male, though...

I always heard of women complaining of thyroid problems so maybe they just don't want to bother unless the number is above the "normal" range. Every time I would take the testosterone test the number would come back lower and lower, and I have to wonder how low does it have to be before they suggest

something is wrong.... I really think these doctors think celiac is just a stomach ache!!!!

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I always heard of women complaining of thyroid problems so maybe they just don't want to bother unless the number is above the "normal" range. Every time I would take the testosterone test the number would come back lower and lower, and I have to wonder how low does it have to be before they suggest

something is wrong.... I really think these doctors think celiac is just a stomach ache!!!!

I am starting to think they don't know how to interpret labs and "think". My ND is great at thinking about the labs. Thankfully.

And statistically thyroid problems are higher in women than men. I have no idea what's up with ignoring the dropping testosterone.

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I am starting to think they don't know how to interpret labs and "think". My ND is great at thinking about the labs. Thankfully.

And statistically thyroid problems are higher in women than men. I have no idea what's up with ignoring the dropping testosterone.

Its been awhile since I posted on this thread, so maybe someone will pick up on it. My recent labs showed my TSH down to 2, and if based on how i feel is an indicator, the thyroid supplement I was taking has worked. I don't feel as tired anymore, my weight is down to a more comfortable and healthy range for me and I don't feel as depressed or low as I used to.

I don't have my numbers, but my T3, T4, and reverse T3 and ratios were normal.

I recently had a saliva test to check cortisol in the morning and there was barely a reading. Mornings are the worst for me. my cortisol level was .3, barely on the chart. does anyone have any knowledge of such a bad cortisol number and how I get that to go up?

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