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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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IrishHeart

Newbie Info 101

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Additional products people ask about:

San-J Organic Tamari Gluten Free Soy Sauce is available.

McCormick single spice/herbs and vanilla are gluten free.

For spice blends, be sure to read the labels!!

Spice blends can not hide grain (gluten). Seasoning blends are a whole different ball game.

Edited by psawyer
Spices are not the same as seasoning.
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If you wish to add to this discussion, please post here

Appropriate comments will be merged into the thread.

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Updated 11/1/12 by IrishHeart

A list of symptoms and conditions associated with Celiac from the Univ. of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

(adapted from Cleo J. Libonati's book Recognizing Celiac Disease)

I had dozens of symptoms myself and found that most short lists do not include them all.

This may help.

http://www.curecelia...SymptomList.pdf

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Updated 1/2/13

Some advanced members felt this explanation of using the multi-quote option would be useful to new members.

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Updated 2/1/13

An excellent resource for celiacs ( Honestly wish I had found it 2 years ago--would have saved me a lot of research time!!)

Still plenty in it for me to learn.

Articles by more than 50 international experts. Not "too techie", short enough chapters ... and very enlightening.

Covers just about everything imaginable: the disease itself, obstacles to healing and solutions,

nutritional advice, trouble-shooting other food intolerances, related conditions, etc.

I was thrilled to see Dr. Gaundalini talk favorably about using probiotics.

I highly recommend it.

Real Life with Celiac Disease

Melinda Dennis, MS, RD, LDN Daniel Leffler, MD. MS

The Celiac Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.

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Updated 11/22/13

Additional suggestions for avoiding cross contamination in your home.

 

 

 

• Don’t use wooden spoons or cutting boards that also are used to prepare gluten-containing foods because the spoons and boards can harbor residual gluten and bacteria. Metal or plastic are better options.

• Cover shared grilling surfaces when barbequing because unless the grill reaches 500˚F or higher for 30 minutes or longer, grilling won’t eliminate any residual gluten.

• Buy a separate waffle maker or bread maker if the one the family uses doesn’t have parts that can be disassembled and placed in the dishwasher.

• If using a separate toaster isn’t possible, use toaster-safe toaster bags such as Celinal Toast-It or Vat19 ToastIt, available online.

Pam Cureton, RD, LDN, a dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland, adds these tips:

• When planning parties at home, prepare a buffet of foods that are 100% gluten free to prevent accidental cross-contamination among family members and guests.

• Buy squeezable condiment containers for ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise to prevent double dipping. If you don’t purchase squeezable containers, mark condiment jars as safe depending on whether they’ve been exposed to gluten-containing foods.

• Store gluten-free products on the top shelf of the pantry or refrigerator so other foods don’t accidentally cross-contaminate them.

 

Shelley Case, BSc, RD, president of Case Nutrition Consulting and author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide, offers the following ideas:

 

• In supermarkets, don’t buy unpackaged foods stored in bins. The scoops used to place the foods in bags or containers may have been previously used on nearby gluten-containing foods and may not have been sufficiently cleaned.

• Use different colored stickers to distinguish between gluten-containing and gluten-free products in the pantry and fridge.

• Purchase a colander in a different color for gluten-free foods so it doesn’t get mixed up with the colander used for gluten-containing foods.

• Buy gluten-free grains that are certified gluten free to ensure cross-contamination didn’t take place during processing.

• Buy gluten-free flours marked as gluten free from reputable companies that are more likely to test for gluten.

• Avoid purchasing imported foods. Other countries may not abide by the same gluten-free standards as the United States.

 

 

 

 

Found here:

 

http://www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/100713p16.shtml

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New book with lots of good info:

 

Gluten Freedom by Alessio Fasano, MD 

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some good info 

https://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free-foods/ingredients/top-10-ingredients-you-really-dont-need-to-worry-about/

Just 1 of the ingredients covered -

"

"Why it’s on worry lists: Maltodextrin can be made from a variety of starches, including corn, potato, rice or wheat.

Why you don’t need to worry: The source does not matter because maltodextrin is such a highly processed ingredient that the protein is removed, rendering it gluten free. Plus, if wheat is used to make maltodextrin, “wheat” will appear on the label. This might give you pause, but even in this case, the maltodextrin would be gluten free. In Canada, maltodextrin made from wheat was tested with one of the most sensitive tests available and no gluten was detected."

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