• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Stop And Shop Shelf Labels - New And Nice
0

5 posts in this topic

Just got back from the grocery store (Stop & Shop) and today they had tags hanging under lots of regular products that said "Gluten Free" in big, clear letters. It was not in the health food aisle, where the gluten-free "special" food is, but in the regular aisles to help with things like mayonnaise, salad dressing, salsas, chips, cereal, etc. It was really nice. Not sure how they determined which products to flag, as some salsas I know are gluten-free did not have the sign, but it is a step forward.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


They do that at Fry's and Safeway too. Problem is they have so many signs saying different things that the gluten-free gets lost in the shuffle.

And then, I see it on stuff I'm really unsure about and I hesitate to use it.

And, it isn't on stuff I know is gluten-free.

But they did put it on plastic containers of spinach in the produce section. Go figure.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a corporate retail background and we charged vendors for everything! (They pay out the wazoo to be in a flyer and even more for the front or back page) I have a feeling that the food manufacturer has to pay extra for those labels to go there. They are wanting to target the gluten free customer. It isn't on some items but it is on others leading me to believe that they pay extra for the "gluten free" label under their item. But yes...I like it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've noticed it seems to be different at every store. At Harmon's, they have a 2 aisle section for "health food" which includes a freezer on one side of an aisle and has all sorts of stuff that's "natural" or "organic" and some that's gluten free. They also label things on the shelves throughout the store. At Smith's they don't have a separate section but do have one three foot section of every aisle for "specialty" items. This includes all the same things, natural and organic and gluten free.

I've noticed though that at both of these stores if I shop the separate section things cost significantly more. Instead of $2 for a bottle of LaChoy soy sauce I'll pay $8 for a bottle that's specially labeled gluten free. Instead of a bag of chips that's $3 I'll pay twice as much because the bag has a big gluten free stamp on the front of it. It's ridiculous! I much prefer reading labels (which I do anyway, even if it says it's gluten free) and buying stuff for half the cost or less by shopping the regular aisles of the store. I do though love the little labels on the shelves as they can point me to something I may not have otherwise considered or have been having trouble finding.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whole Foods does this as well and I believe it is only foods labeled "gluten-free" on the package. They also have a dedicated gluten-free section, which annoys me as some things are in 2 places and some are just in the gluten-free area (like gluten-free oats).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,339
    • Total Posts
      935,562
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,998
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Con Smith
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • This is not quite as cut & dried as it sounds. Although rare, there are diagnosed celiacs who do not have either of those genes. Ravenwoodglass, who posted above, is one of those people. I think she has double DQ9 genes? Am I right Raven?  My point is, that getting the gene testing is not an absolute determination either way.
    • Why yes it is! jmg and myself are NCIS, I mean NCGS specialist/experts or is it NCGI people ourselves. posterboy,
    • LilyR, jmg has given you good resources/links. I used to have constant issues with ear infections that went away when I went gluten free. And recurrent bronchitis they I never have now. NCGS can cause low grade inflammation that you don't realize at the time . .. till you stop eating gluten. That said have you been checked for a UTI infection.  It is not uncommon to have low grade fevers when you have one. My friend at work recently had a bad spell of health and the only symptom she complained about before coming down with a bird flu virus was a low grade persistent fever (not for a few months but for a few years). The last time I had bronchitis before it became pneumonia I had a low grade fever in the few months before my pneumonia diagnosis. Keep looking is my advice to you.  Low grade fevers are fighting off an infection . .  sometimes we don't know why until other symptom's present themselves. I do know that when I went gluten free most of my chronic health issues got better.  I can only assume it (gluten) was triggering inflammation in my body. I hope you find out what is the cause of your fever and that being gluten free helps it. ****** this is not medical advice just some of the ways going gluten free helped me and some possible other causes of a low grade fever that have happened to myself or others that I know of. posterboy,
    • "If the biopsy is negative, then is there another test that can be done to make sure I really don't have celiac? " Yes, we can do a genetic testing for the celiac gene, I think it is the DQ2 and DQ8 gene, and maybe one other.   If you don't have one of these genes, I was told that you can not have Celiac.   See if your insurance will pay for one of this test.   If not, I think you can pay out of pocket for about $300.
    • I was just thinking the same thing! 
  • Upcoming Events