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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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Gluten-free menus enter food chain

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK (AP) - As a longtime chef in four-star restaurants, Joseph Pace had seen appreciative customers before. But nothing prepared him for the day that a well-dressed man walked into his Greenwich Village restaurant, ordered a pizza and a beer, and broke into tears.

That man, Pace recalls, had been diagnosed 10 years earlier with celiac disease - an incurable affliction that makes the body unable to take anything containing gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley and rye.

The pizza and beer that Pace serves in his restaurant Risotteria, like many other items on his menu, are formulated with substitutes for wheat and barley, making his place a magnet for people who have celiac disease. The customer told Pace that he hadn't been able to enjoy a pizza and beer for a decade.

"This is what the restaurant business is," Pace said. "Making people happy."

Not every customer may be as effusive as that one, but Pace says he gets tremendous amounts of feedback from customers, which also helps him try out new recipes. His latest experiment is a pasta made from white beans. Rice, the main ingredient in risotto, is naturally gluten-free.

Founded just five years ago, Pace's restaurant quickly became known among people with celiac disease, who make heavy use of the Internet and e-mail to share restaurant recommendations.

Several major restaurant chains are also reaching out to the celiac community. Outback Steakhouse, P.F. Chang's and other restaurant companies offer menus of gluten-free dishes, and more are joining them.

Last month, Mitchell's Fish Market, a 13-restaurant chain based in Columbus, Ohio, introduced gluten-free menus, and six months ago Boston-based Legal Sea Foods did the same in its 31 restaurants. Richard Vellante, the executive chef for Legal Sea Foods, said his company adopted a gluten-free menu after hearing requests from customers and also noticing that competing restaurants were doing it.

For people with celiac disease, dining out can become a source of anxiety because of the risk of unintentionally eating something that contains gluten.

Many consult pocket-sized Clan Thompson food guides published by a Maine family which has six members living with the disease. The Thompsons started making the guides in 1997 and now sell nearly 5,000 a year. Mother Lani K. Thompson, who does not have celiac disease herself, says she's seen a "huge jump" in awareness of the disease in the past year and a half.

Kevin Seplowitz, a former computer security expert who developed the first commercially produced gluten-free beer, Bard's Tale, was diagnosed with celiac disease almost four years ago. He even quit going out to dinner, fearful of inadvertently eating something with gluten in it.

"I think the most underappreciated aspect of being diagnosed with a chronic disease is the psychological impact," Seplowitz said. "You have to be very diligent about it. If we order something and say, a barbecue sauce had beer in it and they say it didn't, we get sick."

Outback Steakhouse, a major casual dining chain with 760 restaurants, has offered a gluten-free menu since 1998, and its Tampa, Fla.-based parent company Outback Steakhouse Inc. has also adopted gluten-free menus at two of its other chains, Carrabba's Italian Grill and Bonefish Grill.

"They're a very loyal following," Ben Novello, president of Outback Steakhouse, said of celiac patients. "The return goes beyond the sales that we generate from the loyal customers we get. It goes to goodwill."

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Wish I lived in Columbus, Boston or Tampa ... :P

There is a place with gluten-free-WF pies (cooked to order, about half an hour) near me but it plays a very loud sound track unfortunately ...

I read of several fish & chip shops that have a gluten-free-WF day a month and people drive several hundred miles for it ...

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    • Wow guys just read all the replies Thankyou all so much!!! There are so many things you've all said that has triggered a light bulb in my little head!  The glasses may not be clean!!  I will put this to a test. One night I'll stick to bottles of cider (double checked are gluten-free)  another I'll try the Gin or William chase vodka if I can find it! And see the effects. if I loose many days due to these not working I'll see a practitioner and see what the deal is!  Before I was diagnosed at Coeliac... I went to a herbalist who did a test and said corn is funny on my body!!! But then 18months later (when I became incontinant and lost a lot of weight) my bloods came back positive (after begging the docs and telling them it wasn't IBS)  i don't tend to snack at bars on food but I must admit I never thought it could be the way it's served!!  The humour and information has made me feel so much better  thanks all  xxx
    • Hey Matt  thanks for your reply fellow Brit! I this is very interesting... I am very sensitive to cross contamination... e.g. A sieve wasn't washed properly when I lived at my mums so when I had drained my gluten-free pasta .. I hadn't even eaten the dish before I started to pass out and go dizzy and hot .. calling for my bf and mum ( they had a great team going when I would have an episode) it's horrendous!  The fatigue is something I imagine every coeliac suffers with! I have to nap a lot.  Ok so the booze I drink most of is -processo -amaretto -vodka, wine, cider (very rarely)  when I drink at home I'm fine!!!  I wonder if it's cross contamination from the bar or the level of alcohol?!  I also had a jäger bomb shot on Friday (looked it up and a lot of people say it's gluten-free)  it's a hard live but someone's got to do it!!  Thanks for the reply!  When you get poorly from gluten (and the other evil candidates) are you so bad you can't function and feel your body is about to snap?  Kind regards  steph 
    • Hi Steph and welcome I'm yet another Brit, funny how the alcohol threads flush us out I don't drink now but after a big night I used to get truly savage all day hangovers, much worse than those of my friends. They could include splitting headaches, vomiting, nausea, a 'fuzziness' in my head, sweats etc.  After I put the pieces together and went gluten free I had a 'big night' on cider only and the next day was a revelation. What I'd thought was a 'normal' hangover was, for me at least, anything but. With gluten out of the equation hangovers were a breeze! The difference was mind blowing and just one more example of how gluten had been messing with me over the years. So when I read your post my first thought was that there was some trace gluten contamination going on. However: Obviously you've been at the diet for some considerable time now and know the score. I know Coeliac UK are firmly of the opinion that all spirits are safe but some (note some this a contentious one :D) members here will tell you they react to gluten based grain spirits for instance which distillation should render safe.  Then there's the dangers of shared lines if you're drinking say Strongbow in a pub as alluded to above. Lastly it its wine, there's the often cited but maybe apocryphal these days 'flour to seal the casks' possibility. Finally there's bar snacks, maybe a brand of nuts etc that you snack on that may have changed their production process? I'm sure you've thought of these already, but it may be useful if you post your alcoholic drink choices / bar snack of choice up here maybe someone will have some input?.   The second thing which leapt out was: Would you class yourself as super sensitive to cross contamination etc? Firstly that would make the cross contamination theory more compelling. You could test that out by having a drink at home under controlled circumstances to see whether the same issue arises? That could also answer the quantity question. Does one safe drink trigger it, two, three etc? Finally, and this is one that I find difficult, knowing you have the gluten issue may lead you to assume it's that when it could be something else. I tend to attribute EVERYTHING in the world to gluten these days due to it being able to affect me in so many different ways. Crisis in Korea? Gluten. Russian tanks massing on the Ukrainian border? Check their wheat intake. Global warming? etc. So it may make sense to pursue some other ideas at the same time. Try:  http://goaskalice.columbia.edu/answered-questions/suddenly-drinking-alcohol-makes-me-sick http://www.steadyhealth.com/topics/very-abnormal-hangovers-thinking-it-could-be-allergy-to-alcohol and a doctor's answer: http://www.steadyhealth.com/medical-answers/abnormal-reactions-to-alcohol Cheers Sorry, best of luck! Matt  
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