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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Gas And Can't Figure Out The Cause
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Ive been gluten-free for 6 mos and things are going well. However the past several days I've had smelly gas each night. I'd say 3 of the last 4 days. Always at dinner time or later. No glutening symptoms, normal BMs, feel fine otherwise. My meals each of these days have been different. I thought maybe it was garlicky hummus but no hummus today. I can't ID a common ingredient from those days breakfasts, lunches, or snacks. Could lactose cause symptoms 6-12 hrs later?

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I do believe lactose could cause symptoms 6-12 hours later. That may well be your problem. Try laying off of it for the next few days & see what happens.

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When this happens to me, I always suspect soy. They're sneaking that stuff into everything! The last time it happened, it turned out that the chopped garlic I was using had soybean oil in.

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I have been lactose intolerant for most of my life, and several in the family including brothers and nephews. From my own experience I will say absolutely yes, it can happen 6-12 hrs. later. Smelly gas going on for much of the evening is typical of some. Others will get cramps and run to the bathroom and then it will be over for them. It depends on how much lactose you have consumed and your rate of your digestive system and what else is in there being digested at the time, and the degree of your lactose intolerance.

The lactose intolerance tests at my Digestive Disease Center can take up to 4 hours. They cannot tell you how long the test will be in advance because people digest at different rates. They just say be prepared to stay there for up to 4 hours. You are given a big dose of lactose sugar to drink, and there is nothing else in your system at the time because you have not been allowed to eat or drink since the evening before.

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Before you start suspecting other foods and cutting them out give it another day or so. Garlic and chickpeas are both gas producing foods (especially when your stomach is vulnerable) and it can take more than a day to clear from your system.

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I would suggest the garlic hummus is a real possibility!

Do you eat gluten-free grains? I ate some gluten free granola (KIND) the other day, and I had horrible gas for two days- ONLY thing different that I had, no eating out or anything abnormal. I am thinking of trying it again to see if it does the same!! We tried gluten-free pizza crust a few weeks ago, and had the same effect- I assume it can be common to have issues digesting gluten-free grains?

I would give it another day, the garlic hummus sounds like the culprit!

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So, I was gas free once again on the 6th, 7th, 8th. I was out of town the 6th and 7th and eating gopicnic meals and thai food. No issues. Ate as I usually would at home on the 8th and no problem. Last night I was a bit bloated, but not gassy and tonight I'm gassy again. I did actually have hummus, although different brand, while traveling, but not here at home, so I've ruled that out.

Yesterday:

breakfast: coffee w/ creamer, scrambled egg w/ a bit of shredded cheese and avocado

lunch: diet dr pepper and a few tortilla chips (on the run and no time for lunch)

dinner: corn pasta fagioli, salad, strawberry shortcake (gluten-free busquick w/ fresh picked berried and whip cream)

Today:

breakfast: coffee w creamer, gluten-free Vans waffle w/ strawberries

lunch: ham and shredded cheese on corn tortilla w/ avocado, leftover gluten-free pregresso corn chowder soup

dinner: turkey sausage, cantaloupe, boiled spinach, strawberry shortcake (gluten-free busquick w/ fresh picked berried and whip cream)

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As a friend of mine who is a science teacher says

Carbs = gassssssss

Protein = smell

The things I would focus in on are corn, creamer and ham.

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Speaking from my own experience only and noticing what you posted that you ate I might first suspect corn. I would agree creamer and ham could be possibilities also but I see a lot of corn in there.

Speaking as someone who has corn intolerance herself (and having a little granddaughter who could clear out a movie theater with smelly noisy gas if you make the mistake of giving her popcorn) I can tell you what I know about it.

Symptoms can include nausea, bloating, cramping, gas, diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

The cause of intolerance is because the small intestines do not produce enough of the enzymes needed to digest the proteins and/or sugars that are found in corn. It might also be that you are not intolerant but just consumed more corn in one day than you intestines could break down and digest.

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Thanks all for helping me troubleshoot. I keep a food log so I'll keep an eye on the corn connection.

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