• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Cheez Whiz Not Gluten Free?
0

16 posts in this topic

I'm in Canada right now visiting my family..I was calling some companies making sure about different foods that mom has here in the house..I was informed by Kraft that Cheese Whiz is NOT gluten free. I read on this website it was.....is there a difference between U.S. and Canada or what?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


The answer is not a simple one.

Kraft has an excellent policy regarding gluten, but it can be confusing for folks new to the game.

Kraft's gluten disclosure policy is the same in every country where they do business. If an ingredient is derived from a gluten grain, the gluten grain will be named on the package label, either in the ingredient list, or in a "contains" statement (in practice, usually both).

If you call their customer service line, they will NEVER say that a product is gluten-free. This is because products change, and they can not be sure that the ingredient information in their CURRENT files matches the product you actually have, even if the UPC (bar code) is the same.

They WILL tell you to read the label on the package that you have. The ingredient list there will accurately reflect the product in that container. If any gluten-grain derived ingredient is present, the grain will be clearly disclosed.

That is as good as it gets with mainstream manufacturers. Kraft is on our side.

So, read the label on your mom's Cheez Whiz jar. It will have the answer.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in Canada right now visiting my family..I was calling some companies making sure about different foods that mom has here in the house..I was informed by Kraft that Cheese Whiz is NOT gluten free. I read on this website it was.....is there a difference between U.S. and Canada or what?

Krista, many products vary from county to country....even US and Canada, for instance, Campbell's products are very different in both countries.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add to this now..I called them about something from my grandmothers house the other day...regarding a jello chocolate pudding snack. I wasn't sure about what one ingredient was and i wanted to be sure so i called them and the guy on the phone told me it contained stuff derived from gluten.....even though nothing was clearly listed..so i was confused....Later on that day I called them again about something else unexpectedly and the woman on the line told me the same thing you have...they will clearly list. But when i told her about what the guy told me about the jello she didn't know why he'd say it contains it and to not eat it if it's not clearly listed. I wonder if it was the same guy who told me that about cheese whiz? It's only causing me confusion..should i eat the cheese whiz and pudding snacks or not? uugh

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess there's only one way for you to know, how bad do you want the flippin' cheez whiz??? Patrick which thread was it that we discussed the modified food starch? That's a good one with a link to the info. Very interesting info. I'm not knew to this gig, per se, but there's always more to learn. I have made the choice that if I don't know what it is, can't pronounce the ingredients, or question anything I won't eat it. Some are better at the labels than I, but I just can't take a chance and that's my own personal feelings. I'm more of a whole foods person anyway, so it all comes down to what you like I guess. So, how bad do you want that cheez whiz? Lol I think I'd forgotten it even existed until now, my Canadian cousins used to eat it on toast...while I was breaking out my American peanut butter, oh the memories! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Kraft will clearly label any ingredient derived from a gluten source by naming the grain. They do not test their ingredients or final products for gluten content. Many of us here, including me, trust Kraft products.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow this scares me. I haven't had Cheez Whiz since going gluten-free, but...I'll have to check the label like you said.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




You're the second person who has gotten a weird answer from Kraft. I don't think they are training their telephone people about gluten. I'd trust the label.

I'm enough of a health food person that Cheez Whiz is out of the question anyway. :lol: If I'm going to wreck my stomach with dairy, it's going to be a really high-quality aged cheese!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh I didn't want the cheese whiz but my mom may put it on my gluten free hamburger bun for instance and put it in the oven to toast it to have hamburgers etc.

I just called about their peanut butter..and the guy...who i hope isn't the same guy...gave me the same talk about labeling and i felt okay about it but then he went on a seperate shpiel and said if it lists "spices" on the label or anything like that to ASSUME IT HAS GLUTEN. So I said to him this confused me cause I thought kraft was a company that if the spices contain gluten it will list it in brackets next to it....he said to assume it does...anyone out there eating kraft products that list "spices"? Just sheer curiosity.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing grain-derived can be listed as "spices." "Seasonings" are another matter.

In Canada and in the US, wheat must be disclosed using the word "wheat."

Kraft's policy is:

The ingredient information on labels of Kraft products is very specific to help you make accurate and informed choices. If a Kraft product has an ingredient that is a source of gluten, the specific grain will be listed in the ingredient statement, no matter how small the amount. For labeling purposes, Kraft products will always state the names 'wheat, barley, rye and/or oats' when they are added to a product either directly as an ingredient or as part of an ingredient.

Here is one link to a place you can find it for yourself.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Gee I wonder if it's the same guy I got on the phone before? :P So i SHOULDN'T assume spices means gluten then like he was saying?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you did get a different guy on the phone at Kraft, I'm really starting to wonder about the accuracy of the information on their website. There is a pretty serious discrepancy between what Peter quoted and what their telephone reps are telling people. Do you trust the website or what the telephone reps are being instructed to tell customers???

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In any event, it would be a violation of Canadian and US rules to label a grain product as "spices." That fact says that the person is confused or misinformed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at the grocery store just now to get some items. Although Cheez Whiz is not a product I use, I read the labels on the regular and light versions.

I am in Canada, and based on a read of the labels, they are both gluten-free per Canadian label regulations.

Both list mustard as an ingredient. Both say "Contains: Milk, Mustard"

The inclusion of mustard means they have been updated to comply with new rules effective August 4, 2012. Those revisions add mustard, and ALL GLUTEN GRAINS to the priority allergen list (wheat has been there for years).

FWIW, the ingredients did not list spices, but did list seasoning. Under the old rules, barley malt could conceivably have been hidden there, although I never found a case where it was.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really really strange...well...I honestly trust the fact that they say they label properly...i still use their shredded cheese and what not but i'm just a little nervous now but a lady i talked to on the phone the same day as the guy who originally told me this....she said what you all are saying...so it's rather confusing. Seems like there is a divide with the phone representatives.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was at the grocery store just now to get some items. Although Cheez Whiz is not a product I use, I read the labels on the regular and light versions.

I am in Canada, and based on a read of the labels, they are both gluten-free per Canadian label regulations.

Both list mustard as an ingredient. Both say "Contains: Milk, Mustard"

The inclusion of mustard means they have been updated to comply with new rules effective August 4, 2012. Those revisions add mustard, and ALL GLUTEN GRAINS to the priority allergen list (wheat has been there for years).

FWIW, the ingredients did not list spices, but did list seasoning. Under the old rules, barley malt could conceivably have been hidden there, although I never found a case where it was.

I am a super sensitive Celiac and have recently tried Cheez Wiz in Canada, and I was fine. I have reacted to many other products

listed as gluten free by the manufacturer which were under 20 ppm such as Frenchs Mustard (I am currently having a severe reaction to Frenchs Yellow Mustard) but Cheez Wiz has not caused me any grief. Hooray!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,339
    • Total Posts
      935,566
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,999
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Con Smith
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yes you are correct. Interestingly my genes in the US are thought to be more associated with RA. Which is something they thought I had prediagnosis. In the Middle and far East they are more likely to be associated with celiac and they are rare genes in Caucasians which I am according to my parents known heritage. I always caution folks not to take the gene tests as absolute proof they can't have celiac because I had one child who had positive blood and biopsy, did well on the diet, then got genes tested in young adulthood and was told they could never be celiac. Of course that resulted in her abandoning the diet. I worry but hope someday doctors will realise we still have a lot to learn about the genetics of this disease. PS While I still have some deformity in my hands my joint pain resolved after a few months on the diet.
    • It seems like you really need a concrete or near concrete answer so I would say maybe you ought to get the gene testing. Then you can decide on the gluten challenge.   Thanks! I am convinced our dogs are there waiting for us. Meanwhile they are playing, running, laughing, barking & chasing. I have another favorite quote dealing with dogs: "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home & examine your conscience."  ~~~ Woodrow Wilson ~~~
    • I can't help thinking that all of this would be so much easier if the doctor I went to 10 years ago would have done testing for celiac, rather than tell me I probably should avoid gluten. He was looking to sell allergy shots and hormone treatment, he had nothing to gain from me being diagnosed celiac. I've been messing around ever since, sort-of-most-of the time being gluten free but never being strict about it. I really feel like three months of eating gluten would do my body a lot of permanent damage. I've got elevated liver enzymes for the third time since 2008 and no cause can be found which might be good, I guess. I wonder if it would be reasonable to do the HLA testing first, to decide if I really need to do the gluten challenge. If the biopsy is negative, that is. Squirmingitch, love your tag line about dogs in heaven. We lost the best dog ever last December. I sure hope all my dogs are there waiting for me!
    • Most (90%-95%) patients with celiac disease have 1 or 2 copies of HLA-DQ2 haplotype (see below), while the remainder have HLA-DQ8 haplotype. Rare exceptions to these associations have been occasionally seen. In 1 study of celiac disease, only 0.7% of patients with celiac disease lacked the HLA alleles mentioned above. Results are reported as permissive, nonpermissive, or equivocal gene pairs. From: http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/88906  
    • This is not quite as cut & dried as it sounds. Although rare, there are diagnosed celiacs who do not have either of those genes. Ravenwoodglass, who posted above, is one of those people. I think she has double DQ9 genes? Am I right Raven?  My point is, that getting the gene testing is not an absolute determination either way.
  • Upcoming Events