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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Types Of Celiac Disease
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I found this very interesting article on a link on Celiac Disease and thought I would share it. In this piece, there is quite a bit of "eye-opening" relative information. The fact that there is some "typing" makes sense and then there are the "Marsh" types as well that hold more definite terms. The part I really like is the added information on what needs to be "watched" along being gluten free. What areas we need to focus on for remedial and distressed issues. Follow-up care just seems to be lacking from what I have heard and read so far. This link actually gives some insight for future Dr. visits we Celiacs need.

http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/gastroenterology/celiac-disease-malabsorptive-disorders/

Hope it helps others as well.

:)

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I found this very interesting article on a link on Celiac Disease and thought I would share it. In this piece, there is quite a bit of "eye-opening" relative information. The fact that there is some "typing" makes sense and then there are the "Marsh" types as well that hold more definite terms. The part I really like is the added information on what needs to be "watched" along being gluten free. What areas we need to focus on for remedial and distressed issues. Follow-up care just seems to be lacking from what I have heard and read so far. This link actually gives some insight for future Dr. visits we Celiacs need.

http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/gastroenterology/celiac-disease-malabsorptive-disorders/

Hope it helps others as well.

:)

Good link, especially because it is written in English and not scientish :)

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Good link, especially because it is written in English and not scientish :)

And it isn't trying to sell us something! :D

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Great article. Thanks for posting the link.

I was very interested in the long list of other conditions people might have that should prompt celiac testing. It is too often difficult to get doctors to consider testing for celiac!

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This should be emailed to each and every doctor on the planet (except mine who is very good).

One of the most informative articles I have read in ages - thanks for posting! :)

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I am just thankful that my "silent celiac" 11 year old had a doctor that recognized it goes with thyroid conditions. I am still amazed we found it before symtoms and with only "simplification of the villi". (Although, a very slight small symtom would be helpful so I could know if these restaurants are safe!)

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I am just thankful that my "silent celiac" 11 year old had a doctor that recognized it goes with thyroid conditions. I am still amazed we found it before symtoms and with only "simplification of the villi". (Although, a very slight small symtom would be helpful so I could know if these restaurants are safe!)

I know what you mean. I was diagnosed as a silent celiac (through genetic screening) so never know whether I have been glutened or not. I assume not because I am very careful but you never know when eating out.

My villi were very blunted, nearly flat but I am glad that your son was diagnosed early!

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Excellent article! Thanks for posting the link.

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Wow, thank you SO MUCH for posting this.

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