• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
andi1235

gluten-free Copycat Olga Bread

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Olga Bread is a slightly sweet flatbread that is served in Olga's restaurants, a chain that (AFAIK) exists only in the Midwest USA. They're pretty commonly found in shopping malls, in my experience.

I grew up eating at Olga's in Michigan, and one of the things I missed the most post-Celiac diagnosis was Olga bread, so I decided to see if I could find a recipe online. Sure enough, I managed to track one down here: http://www.copykatchat.com/recipe-requests/30154-2.htm. Obviously, this is a gluteny recipe, so I decided to try my hand at adapting it.

My first few attempts failed fairly badly. The bread I made wasn't inedible, but it was dry and didn't have the nice chewy texture I remembered from "real" Olga bread. Then I realized my problem: gluten-free bread always seems to need more liquid.

I managed to make a VERY successful copycat of the real thing just by adding a half-cup more water to the recipe. :)

My recipe is as follows:

1 cup millet flour

1 cup brown rice flour

1 cup tapioca starch

1 cup sweet rice flour

1 cup milk

1/4 cup honey

1/4 cup butter

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 ounce active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

1 teaspoon sugar

Oil (to oil your hands)

Mix all the dry ingredients in a bowl. Even the yeast.

The original recipe says you have to scald the milk. Basically, what I did was put the milk, butter, and honey into a pan, and heat it all up till the milk was kinda scalded looking. Then I added in the 1/2 cup of water COLD to cool the milk mixture down to a temperature where it wouldn't kill the yeast.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry, and mix it all up till it's blended into something sort of the consistency of cookie dough, and sort of globs together into a ball. It shouldn't be pourable, but it shouldn't be like play-dough, either. The dough will be VERY sticky, too.

Heat a dry, non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Don't turn it all the way up to high or your bread will burn.

Pour out some oil. Coat your hands liberally with the oil (you really can't use too much oil for this part), grab a golf-ball sized (or so) ball of dough, and roll it into something roughly ball-shaped and coated in oil. If the dough is sticking to your hands, you need more oil. Flip the dough back and forth on your hands until you flatten it out into something roughly pancake-shaped. Carefully lay the dough-pancake in the hot frying pan. Try not to let it tear or fold in on itself, but don't worry too much if it does. The dough is very delicate; it will tear if you make it too thin, so leave it a bit thick. It's ok - you'll flatten it down more in the pan. This bit takes practice, and is probably easier if you have larger hands than mine. ;)

Your goal is to make approximately 1/4-inch thick pancake/pita things, as large around as you can manage with your hands and your frying pan. What I found is that if the heat on my frying pan is relatively low (I set my electric stove to 4 out of a maximum of 6; no idea what that translates to in other people's stoves), I could drop the mostly-flat dough into the pan, then oil the flipper and sort of flatten and spread the dough into something mostly flat, then flip it and press it down. You only want to just brown each side, while making sure the bread eventually cooks all the way through. Once one side starts to cook, you can flip it over and it will hold together well enough that you can squish it down to appropriate thinness. Cook all the balls of dough until you run out. How many breads you get will depend entirely on how big you make them. I recommend a larger frying pan, and trying to make them as thin as you can without tearing. You could probably roll them out on parchment paper, or use one of those two-sided sandwich grill things, too.

A couple notes:

The original recipe called for one egg. I just made a batch, and accidentally left out the egg. My bread was a complete success, so I guess the egg isn't necessary. Add it or not, whatever you like.

I used butter and regular milk. I'm sure it would work fine with margarine and dairy-free milk, if you needed to make it vegan/dairy free (in fact, the original recipe called for margarine rather than butter).

Even if you've never eaten at Olga's, I HIGHLY recommend this bread. The stuff is awesome, and good pretty much any time you would normally use a bun or a pita. The restaurant makes a killer gyro sandwich, but also serves the bread with burgers, and hot dogs, and teriyaki chicken stir-fry (one of my favorites), and grilled cheese.

At the restaurant, they also make what they call "snackers," which are seasoned, day-old Olga bread cut into triangles and fried. The seasoning (according to the copycat recipe page), is McCormick Salad Seasoning. They serve these with soup and a soft almond-cheese dip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


This sounds very interesting. Can you roll it around fillings? Or split it open like a pita? Or just use one on top & one on bottom. I'm also thinking about adding herbs or maybe cinnamon and sprinkling with sugar at the end? Do you think any of that would be good? Also, about how many frying pan sized breads did you get?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sounds very interesting. Can you roll it around fillings? Or split it open like a pita? Or just use one on top & one on bottom. I'm also thinking about adding herbs or maybe cinnamon and sprinkling with sugar at the end? Do you think any of that would be good? Also, about how many frying pan sized breads did you get?

I got about 12 frying-pan sized breads; of course that will vary depending on how thick you make them (eg how much dough goes into each bread), and how big your frying pan is.

I made mine too thin to split like a pita, but I suspect you could do that if you made them a bit thicker and were clever about it. I don't know the trick to making "real" pita bread. I roll my breads around fillings (today my lunch is some of these with peanut butter and banana). :)

The cinnamon and sugar sounds DELICIOUS. I'll have to try that! :) The right herbs would be fantastic too - you would just want to either reduce the amount of honey in the bread (although that would probably change the texture of the dough, so experimentation in liquid / egg amounts would be necessary - if I reduced the honey content I would DEFINITELY use the egg for structural reasons), or use herbs that would be good with a slightly sweet bread. It's not VERY sweet, but the sweetness is definitely there, so it might be odd with some herb combinations.

The breads are sturdy enough, once cooked, that they would hold together well enough to use to make sandwiches no problem. The actual restaurant uses theirs for hamburger and hot dog buns, among other things. My husband used one the other night as a soft taco shell. Really, the possibilities are pretty much endless. It's a VERY versatile bread :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*wah*

I'm getting "Page not found" :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mateo

the gluten-free recipe is included with the very first poster.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


mateo

the gluten-free recipe is included with the very first poster.....

It's just my computer. I've got it :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FYI, see this post for an update. I've refined the process and it's a little easier, and slightly less messy. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,943
    • Total Posts
      943,611
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      67,283
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Lapplegate888
    Joined
  • Topics

  • Posts

    • You should get the lymph nodes checked. You need to be eating a regular gluten containing diet to get the best & most accurate results for celiac disease.
    • try ragu double cheddar sauce
    • Hi everyone, This is my first post. I am happy to find a forum for being shared and being answered. I am really despressed with my all symptoms and got confused with tons of information from google :((. Sorry if my story below is long and spend your time. I just want to be shared my worries. Thanks I experienced some symptoms such as abdomen pains, diarrhea, fatigue, one side heachade and enlarged lymph nodes. These things are appeared more frequently after I gave birth to my baby 2 years ago. Recently, it becomes quite bad. I have met some family doctors, they did not concern anything until the recent one. She said that I should try gluten free for 1 month, diary free for 2 weeks, then returned. But I still do not do any tests for comfirming except for CBC test and ultra sound for lymph nodes. All results were normal, except for one indicator in blood test a little low (mchc). The doctor said that she had no concern. I have travelled a lot, so it was hard to eliminate gluten totally. I have had some accidentally gluten eating, so I still feel sick, especially abdomen pain and lymph nodes. I am now in strictly diet for 1.5 weeks and feel quite better, except for the lymph nodes. After 2 months, I finally can return doctor office for more discuss, though I am very worried. To talk about the lymph nodes, I have one in gland for 1 year, not movable; another in neck for about 4-5 months, movable. They are in size of a bean. Are they too big? They seem not enlarge or down size from the day I felt them. Recently, I am very scared to find that there are 2 or 3 on going in the lower neck and groin area. They are at the size of peas. And no one is bad pain, just a little discomfortable. Oh my god, I hope you guys can share my feeling... just some days you wake up and find out that some new lumps growing up in your body. That's a terrible feeling. Has anyone experienced the enlarged lymph nodes? Before or after going gluten free diet. Could the diet help to reduce their size or they will still there. I read about the link between celiac and lymphoma. I am really really scared. My daughter, she is just 2. I will have doctor appointment next week, beside the tests to comfirm celiac, should I ask her to check the lymph nodes again also. Any one got celiac and lymphoma at the same time? Please share your experience. Thank you.
    • For the people that been  diagnosed with celiac diseased and med board, when you got out of the army did you get and disability I've been in the army for 6 years and this has been my family's income for the 6 years, so what assistants have you guys been given???
    • That isn't entirely correct.  the gluten-free list is the stuff that they know is & test to be gluten-free and not made with gluten products.  The other list is no gluten ingredients but not tested .  Read the link for the explanation
  • Upcoming Events