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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Tax Break For Celiacs
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17 posts in this topic

I know that celiacs get some sort of tax refund or something for being celiac and having to buy expensive foods. Do we have to save our recipts or do we just have to have a dr note stating that we are celiac?

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Really? I've not heard of this, that's interesting! :)

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A topic from a year ago may be informative:

Also:

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A topic from a year ago may be informative:

Also:

I'm a bit unclear, is this only possible in Canada? A lot of the posters were Canadian in one of the threads. It sure seems like a lot of work, makes me wonder if it would be worth it.

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I'm a bit unclear, is this only possible in Canada? A lot of the posters were Canadian in one of the threads. It sure seems like a lot of work, makes me wonder if it would be worth it.

There is, I recall, an opportunity for a medical expense claim in the US, but I do not know anything about the details. Maybe someone who files a Form 1040 can comment.

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Things get pretty complicated with making the claims in the US. Honestly I can only speak for the most recent year as nothing is set in stone for the upcoming filing year. In short, you'll need medical expenses meeting or exceeding 7.5% of your AGI and medical documentation stating that a gluten free diet is necessary. You would deduct the difference in cost between regular and gluten free replacement foods, so if bread is $2 and gluten free bread is $7 you'd get a $5 deduction. It's quite complicated and I would highly recommend speaking with a tax professional immediately if you are interested in the deduction. (If you wait until tax time it will be too late to bother for this year.)

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There is, I recall, an opportunity for a medical expense claim in the US, but I do not know anything about the details. Maybe someone who files a Form 1040 can comment.

If I remember correctly, with the medical expense you have to itemize your deductions. If you just claim the standard deduction, it would not matter. If you do itemize, I believe that it then depends on how much you make as to whether it makes a difference.

I am not 100% on this, but I know we were checking into since we put 3 kids in braces last year!

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Things get pretty complicated with making the claims in the US. Honestly I can only speak for the most recent year as nothing is set in stone for the upcoming filing year. In short, you'll need medical expenses meeting or exceeding 7.5% of your AGI and medical documentation stating that a gluten free diet is necessary. You would deduct the difference in cost between regular and gluten free replacement foods, so if bread is $2 and gluten free bread is $7 you'd get a $5 deduction. It's quite complicated and I would highly recommend speaking with a tax professional immediately if you are interested in the deduction. (If you wait until tax time it will be too late to bother for this year.)

Oh goodness, it does seem as though this could get pretty hairy rather quickly. I do have a tax professional, so I'll question her and see what she thinks. Thank you for the input, not sure if it's for me but definitely worth looking in to!

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Oh goodness, it does seem as though this could get pretty hairy rather quickly. I do have a tax professional, so I'll question her and see what she thinks. Thank you for the input, not sure if it's for me but definitely worth looking in to!

I used to be a "tax professional" but frankly it drives me up a wall. My best friend is a CPA and I let her keep me in the loop but this past season was my last, I've thrown in the towel. I don't even want to do my own!

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Haha yes, one of my friends is a CPA and she had a rough time this year as well! She dreads tax season every year!

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When claiming that a regular loaf of bread costs $2 and the gluten-free one costs $7, you would need a receipt for the loaf you purchased and proof that a comprable loaf is only $2. I thik these sort of deductions will make you more likely to be audited, so this proof is important. I would imagine there could be an argument that store brand $2 bread is really not the gluten equivalent of a $7 loaf of Canyon Bakehouse Seven grain bread.

If you have enough medical expenses, maybe it would be worth it.

This would be for the US.

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My husband is a chartered accountant and tax specialist and we did this. It didn't really help a great deal - I believe a $400 credit (not a refund). But it is easy for me to track - I keep all receipts and do a simple spreadsheet itemizing everything. Then you just claim what is "reasonable". Revenue Canada cannot refute that. And as stated above, if you do not have lots of other health claims it is not worth doing (I must have weekly massage, physiotherapy, chiro and so on).

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My husband is a chartered accountant and tax specialist and we did this. It didn't really help a great deal - I believe a $400 credit (not a refund). But it is easy for me to track - I keep all receipts and do a simple spreadsheet itemizing everything. Then you just claim what is "reasonable". Revenue Canada cannot refute that. And as stated above, if you do not have lots of other health claims it is not worth doing (I must have weekly massage, physiotherapy, chiro and so on).

Great info, thank you all for your input.

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Thanks guys! I'm thinking I may not do it haha seems like too much work!

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Thanks guys! I'm thinking I may not do it haha seems like too much work!

I agree with you there, Skittles!

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You can deduct the difference between regular food and gluten-free food. For instance, My gluten-free bread is $6.50. If regular bread is $3.50 then you can deduct $3.50. You do need to keep receipts. You can also deduct the mileage for gluten-free shopping and doc appts and nutritionists. Hope this helps.

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Oo I didn't even think about mileage, my gastro is 4 hrs from me, good to know!

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