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Headache Culprit Is Tyramine
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6 posts in this topic

I've had worse headaches in the past couple of weeks than I have had in awhile, and I think I've finally figured out why.

Tyramine.

As a kid, (and I don't think I was a celiac as a kid), I would often get headaches, and it didn't take me too long to figure out that cured meats would give them to me sometimes, and then eating too much aged cheddar and pickles, and then artificial sweeteners caused it too. But it was never really consistent; probably because my diet was never consistent and I'm not super sensitive to it, so I need a certain amount to notice it.

Well, since being gluten and dairy free, I've replaced milk with Almond Breeze. And nuts are on the list of foods that are high in tyramine. I also did a test of eating plain gluten-free weiners, and an hour after eating them, bam, headache. Old meat (which is going to be all cured meat) is high in tyramine.

I will try not having any nuts or nut milk these next few days and see if a gluten-free hotdog will still give me the same reaction. (Since I've been having the Almond Breeze every day or close to it), to see what I can tolerate and in what amounts.

So I guess this is just a heads up to someone who might think they have only a nitrate or sulfate problem or a headache problem and you haven't considered tyramine.

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You poor poor thing! I'm currently tyramine "free" which means simply consuming as little tyramine as is humanly possible. I think what triggered finding out for me was a combination of my propensity for shopping the marked down meats at the stores and the fact that I consumed approximately 3-4 pounds of spinach in a week. Along with my nuts, cheeses, nitrites, nitrates, etc.... you get the idea. It's awesome that you figured out what's causing the problem, not awesome that it's tyramine.

Honestly, if I had to say which was harder, gluten free or tyramine? Tyramine is harder for me. Why? It just is! I can live without all the bread and other stuff, but there are so many healthy foods that full of tyramine that had become staples after going gluten free. Beans, nuts, leafy greens. Frankly though I called the doctor on the caffeine BS. There is no tyramine in caffeine, it can simply be a trigger for headaches by itself. (I'm not tyramine free for headaches, but for another medical condition.)

I am starting to see what I can and can't tolerate in small amounts. Hormel has a nitrate, nitrite preservative free bacon. Oscar Mayer Selects has hot dogs that are also nitrate/nitrite/preservative free and uncured I believe as well. Not really sure what makes them a hot dog but they are tasty on fresh off the grill.

I also gave my husband a heart attack and spent $12 on a jar of coconut butter. He was like can't you have any of these other ones that are cheaper? I was like, no nuts, no seeds, I can't eat ANYTHING! NO! I can eat coconuts, so damn it I'm buying this.

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I can't do high-tyramine foods or nitrates either. Fortunately I only have to avoid the super-high ones like red wine, aged cheese, and cured meat like ham. I'm going to have to try that Hormel bacon if I can find it and see if it works out. Glad I found this thread. :)

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I never heard of tryamine! But feeling it now had a v couple of banana. Have not had in 5 Months. Thought it would help with my muscle issues. Woke up with BIG HEAD ache . Wow best even ever had. Also gluten free , bread, dairy, most meats, sugar, fruit, every thing. Things I can eat can count on my fingers . Thanks again celiac. Com. Info much appreciated! Guess it true . Every one saying I'm falling apart!

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You may have already found the low-histamine & tyramine diet recommended for people with mast cell disorders and others, but here it is:

http://www.mastocytosis.ca/MSC%20HT%20Restricted%20Diet%20Nov2012.pdf

 

Note that it's a good starting point.  Most people find they have to customize their diet to look a lot like this one plus a few adjustments for unique triggers or foods that don't cause trouble (yet).  Good luck, I hope you feel better soon.

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On 8/1/2012 at 1:01 PM, cavernio said:

I've had worse headaches in the past couple of weeks than I have had in awhile, and I think I've finally figured out why.

Tyramine.

 

As a kid, (and I don't think I was a celiac as a kid), I would often get headaches, and it didn't take me too long to figure out that cured meats would give them to me sometimes, and then eating too much aged cheddar and pickles, and then artificial sweeteners caused it too. But it was never really consistent; probably because my diet was never consistent and I'm not super sensitive to it, so I need a certain amount to notice it.

 

Well, since being gluten and dairy free, I've replaced milk with Almond Breeze. And nuts are on the list of foods that are high in tyramine. I also did a test of eating plain gluten-free weiners, and an hour after eating them, bam, headache. Old meat (which is going to be all cured meat) is high in tyramine.

I will try not having any nuts or nut milk these next few days and see if a gluten-free hotdog will still give me the same reaction. (Since I've been having the Almond Breeze every day or close to it), to see what I can tolerate and in what amounts.

 

So I guess this is just a heads up to someone who might think they have only a nitrate or sulfate problem or a headache problem and you haven't considered tyramine.

Tyramines are the culprit for my migraines, which came from rising blood pressure. My doctor does not understand this, since I am not on any meds that would cause that.

Then my intolerance of gluten became a problem when eating away from home. My family is sympathetic. They keep trying new "clean" foods to tempt me. But I can count on one hand the foods that don't cause an effect. 

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