• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Gluten-Free Label But Wheat In Ingredients List
0

Rate this topic

9 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Hi guys,

I'm a little confused. I live in NZ where apparently the food laws are very strict when it comes to labelling a product gluten-free - it must have no detectable traces of gluten. So I bought Sakata rice crackers (seaweed) as it had a gluten-free sign on the front. Started eating it then noticed that under soy sauce, where was wheat in there!

So, is there some sort of processing method that removes the gluten from it and it is actually gluten-free??

Appreciate your input =)

There are a few little exceptions. I'm Aus but I think the laws are similar. The wheat could be from glucose syrup and if that's the case then it is gluten free due to the processing method. In Australia gluten free on a label overides any listing of wheat as it means the processing method has removed the gluten. They still declare the wheat though as some people who are very sensitive can't tolerate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Food Standards Australia New Zealand [FSANZ] is a bi-national Government agency that administer the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code in both countries.

As to labelling: wheat is an allergen that is required by law to be included on the label of any food that it is in ... regardless ..

Food Standards defines gluten free as

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some naturally fermented soy sauce gets broken down by the cultures to where the gluten is below detection limits. Problem is, the tests don't work right on broken-down gluten so you can't really know whether the soy sauce is safe. Since the laws don't take the subtleties of gluten testing into account they can be legally labeled gluten-free. I personally wouldn't eat them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I found this on their site:

http://www.sakata.uk.com/gluten-free.htm

I don't really understand what they mean by: "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

As I said above, "not detectable" assumes the test for gluten works reliably on soy sauce. It doesn't. Eat at your own risk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sakata are a well known gluten free brand, they process the wheat so highly that there is no gluten detected. We have very strict laws so it has to be under 3ppm. We eat sakata stuff all the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


If you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be alright with this product. Funny how when I read this I think of Kikkoman. Their soy sauce contains wheat but is distilled and considered gluten-free. They released a statement about this some time ago and I've read quite a bit about the controversy. After this happened they then released a gluten-free soy sauce, probably more out of spite then actual concern. I've heard that on the gluten-free test kits (which I've never purchased only heard about) people claim Kikkoman is completely safe, the regular one I mean. Meanwhile their gluten-free soy sauce is almost double the price.

It is different for every person and that is why I don't come on here often because all I see are posts about people eating gluten-free food and getting glutened. It is very depressing. Again, if you can tolerate distilled alcohol then you should be fine with this product. Personally, I think they should come out with a blood test to see if you got glutened, one that you can do at home. Now that would be interesting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

> "the wheat proteins are removed or de-natured by the soy sauce manufacturing process and therefore there is no longer any detectable gluten present."

> That makes it sound like any soy sauce would be ok.

I would call bulls$#& on that - not you what they put on their site. If that were true I would not get searing pains and all that other fun stuff that comes along with having Celiac. Plus if every other brand of soy sauce in the world does not make the claim that their soy sauc eis gluten free, I think they are just doing an end run around the laws to make their product Gluten free so that more people will buy it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,157
    • Total Posts
      939,982
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,141
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Victoria Zoey
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • You mention low cortisol. Did you get tested for Addison's disease?
    • Hi Matt, I was never fully glutenfree. Tried it and then got such bad hypglycemia. My blood sugar started to drop dangerously low every hour. After that I decided to take it step by step. I had only 2 slices of bread left. But still have 1,5 slices of bread left. Right now I fall asleep after meals with only tiny amounts of carbs, even if that is non gluten. This is because my cortisol has gotten too low. And my female hormones as well. This all got this bad upon tryng to cut out gluten. As there is no doctor yet to support me in this, it is too dangerous to continue on my own. 
    • The stool and saliva test are not considered to be valid by mainstream medical.  Helpful tools, but again, not recognized by the GI Association.  You need to be on a gluten diet for 8 to 12 weeks prior and then ask your endo or PCP for a celiac blood panel.  KarenG gave you a link that explains the testing.   I certainly sounds like you should do the gluten challenge and get retested.   I am officially diagnosed, but my hubby is not.  He went Gluten Free per the poor advice of two medical doctors.  It worked though.  He saw enough improvement to make him adhere to the diet for 16 years.  He never cheats on the diet.  I need my diagnosis since I did not have GI issues at the time of my diagnosis.  I could not believe that both of us would have gluten issues. I hope you figure it out and your health improves!  
    • Wow!  Good for your daughter asking if the medication was  gluten free.   She might not be lactose intolerant at all.  It is the one intolerance that is most common among celiacs.  Just stay the course.  It just takes time.  Each individual is different as to how they heal.  Kids are supposed to heal faster.   Will the GI recheck her antibodies at three months or six?  Follow-up Care is important.  http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faq/how-often-should-follow-up-testing-occur/  Soon, she will be just fine!  
    • Well I was going to attach the copies of the test but it says the file is too large. The stool results are from a "Comprehensive Stool Analysis/Parasitology x3 test by Progressive Medical. Sample 1 had rare RBC, WBC, and Yeast. Sample 2 had Rare yeast. And Sample 3 had Rare RBC and yeast. The yeast amount is in the normal range but it doesn't say anything about RBC health.  I'm not sure if a "rare" amount of RBC  (in my stool, yes) means anything but this holistic provider thought it meant I needed further investigation. She was also the one who diagnosed me with Celiac though. My grandfather did have colon cancer so maybe she is being precautionary.  Other tests from 2017 (don't remember if I was eating gluten that week but I have been on and off for a few months): Blood tests: T-transglutaminase, IgA 4 (range 0-20) IGa Antibody 186 (range 81-463) Antigliadin Abs, IgA 12 (range 0-20) and the REticulin IgA and IgG were negative. Stool tests: Lysozyme 644 (range <600), indicates inflammation Secretory IgA 150 (range 51-204) Saliva test from 2014 (was eating gluten then): sIgA 61.7 range (25.9-136.5) Gliadin IgA (gluten) 18.6 H (normal <6.0) Gliadin Antibody Ration 30.1 H (normal <22.4%) This is pretty confusing... Please let me know what y'all think!
  • Upcoming Events