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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Dh On The Palm Of Your Hand?
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12 posts in this topic

Can DH break on on the palm of your hand? Reason for the question - My mother was, we believe, undiagnosed celiac and had what we now believe was DH on her elbows and knees. She also had several other auto diseases. I am celiac. My daughter recently broke out with very itchy blisters on the palm of her hands that pop and then peel. She said that as long as she keeps lotion on her hands it seems to go away. It also started during the time when her husband was in he hospital and she was under a lot of stress (stress?!) She is convinced that it is just stress doing it to her.....I am thinking possible start of celiac symptoms? Main problem here is that she has no health insurance :(. Any advice from anyone?

Thanks!!

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I have had a very few on the palms of my hands. More on the sides of fingers as well as sides of hands. but yes, I have had it on my palms & I have read others here too who have had it to a worse degree than myself on their palms. Stress can trigger dh outbreaks as well as celiac making itself known. So while stress can do lots of things to us; it can also make the dh show itself.

With the family history there I would say it's quite likely your daughter is experiencing the start of dh.

Why worry about health insurance? She doesn't need anyone's permission to go gluten-free. And we know the treatment for celiac disease is gluten-free. Period.

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Yes, my son and I both get DH on our palms (and the soles of our feet, too). My DH was actually triggered when my son was placed in Intensive Care when he was eight weeks old. I believe that stress played a part in triggering it.

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I also get (currently have!) DH on my palms and soles, so yes it is possible. The history and risk factors are strong, although if they are clearing with lotion and it really is DH, I'd love to know what that lotion is! I'm in a different camp when it comes to Dx. I believe that you should try to get a Dx. It has helped me tremendously not to second guess myelf all the time, and has been shown to increase compliance with a gluten-free diet, although there are many ppl who get so sick eating gluten that they don't need extra incentive to stick to the diet. Best of luck - let us know how you get on.

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I also get (currently have!) DH on my palms and soles, so yes it is possible. The history and risk factors are strong, although if they are clearing with lotion and it really is DH, I'd love to know what that lotion is! I'm in a different camp when it comes to Dx. I believe that you should try to get a Dx. It has helped me tremendously not to second guess myelf all the time, and has been shown to increase compliance with a gluten-free diet, although there are many ppl who get so sick eating gluten that they don't need extra incentive to stick to the diet. Best of luck - let us know how you get on.

I can understand some ppl needing the dx for compliance sake & especially for kids & teens. For myself the dh is so terrorizing that I don't need any other incentive to stick strictly to the diet.

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Thanks for all the replies. I was afraid that it might be the start of Celiac symptoms when she told me. I mentioned it to her but she assured me that it was just stress. :(

Some years back I had the dreadful itchy bumps on my elbows for several months but then they disappeared one day long before I went gluten-free. Seems like maybe DH has a mind of it's own! ?

Of course I know that we don't need insurance or a dx to go gluten-free but for some, and I am thinking my daughter included, a dx is important. In spite of the fact that my kids are very careful around me and very conscious of my "diet" they don't want to hear that they could be at risk. You know the old familiar family doesn't really want it hear it story...... Unfortunately she lives about 1500 miles away and I only see her once a year. sigh. Well, I will send her some info, keep my mouth shut and not nag. If I can........ !

Thanks for the feedback.................

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Forgot to add that my daughter is 38, has severe endomerosis, difficuly getting pregnant..... just like me. Poor kid!!

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At celiac conferences, the mantra is, "Just wait until she wants to get pregnant. Then, she will consider the possibility that she has celiac." This is what is stated every time someone shares that a young female relative refuses to get tested or do a trial of the gluten-free diet even though symptoms are obvious. If this argument doesn't work with your daughter, she may never consider a celiac diagnosis (unless she becomes extremely ill or the DH gets out of control). I hope she sees the light sooner than later!

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You're a good & wise mom cap6. You can lead a horse to water but you have to drown them to get them to drink it. Life will take care of it sooner or later. Like rosetapper --- I hope she sees the light sooner.

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At celiac conferences, the mantra is, "Just wait until she wants to get pregnant. Then, she will consider the possibility that she has celiac." This is what is stated every time someone shares that a young female relative refuses to get tested or do a trial of the gluten-free diet even though symptoms are obvious. If this argument doesn't work with your daughter, she may never consider a celiac diagnosis (unless she becomes extremely ill or the DH gets out of control). I hope she sees the light sooner than later!

Thanks...... She has four stepkids so more babies at her age aren't in the plan. lol I am going to just lay low for a bit. Her husband who is 41 has CHD and had a stroke so she has a lot on her hands. Me pushing right now on the celiac issue probably won't help. I threw it out there to her and and will do the "quiet mom" thing for a couple of months. I was grateful for all the replies as didn't want to start on her if I wasn't sure. !!

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:)

You're a good & wise mom cap6. You can lead a horse to water but you have to drown them to get them to drink it. Life will take care of it sooner or later. Like rosetapper --- I hope she sees the light sooner.

Thank you!

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I had very painful DH on the palms of my hands until I was diagnosed and went gluten free. I haven't had it since.

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