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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Triglycerides
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My triglycerides are practically non-existant and I see from a search of the site that others have commented on both low and high results. I hate to ask this question at the risk of sounding whiny over something that most people struggle at the opposite end of the spectrum, but I can't find anything saying whether an extremely low triglyceride level indicates a poor/unhealthy fat absorption. However, the lit does say that people who drink alcohol and eat a lot of carbs have higher triglycerides. So is it better to view a low triglyceride level as more than just a fat intake issue?

To the person who asked about how do you know if the diet is working just before my post:

My Vit D (fat soluble) levels have gradually increased after being on the diet for a year. That's been my best objective indicator. I also gained a little weight, though that's certainly not an indicator for all Celiacs.

More subjective or maybe objective, I haven't thrown up in a really, really, really long time, maybe a year. Clearer thinking. Softer skin. Far, far, far less nausea. Less joint pain. (Joint pain and nausea are the first symptoms I get if I eat crosscontaminated products.) Better energy, though I would like to not get fatigued so easily with strenuous exercise. Surprisingly, my eyes used to feel sensitive, that all went away.

The more I stick to the diet, the easier it is to tell if I'm sick. I've learned what normal feels like.

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Aaah...normal. I thought that was an urban legend? ;)

Sorry...I can't answer your triglycerides question...but, I'm very happy for you (your progress)...

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My triglycerides are practically non-existant and I see from a search of the site that others have commented on both low and high results. I hate to ask this question at the risk of sounding whiny over something that most people struggle at the opposite end of the spectrum, but I can't find anything saying whether an extremely low triglyceride level indicates a poor/unhealthy fat absorption. However, the lit does say that people who drink alcohol and eat a lot of carbs have higher triglycerides. So is it better to view a low triglyceride level as more than just a fat intake issue?

To the person who asked about how do you know if the diet is working just before my post:

My Vit D (fat soluble) levels have gradually increased after being on the diet for a year. That's been my best objective indicator. I also gained a little weight, though that's certainly not an indicator for all Celiacs.

More subjective or maybe objective, I haven't thrown up in a really, really, really long time, maybe a year. Clearer thinking. Softer skin. Far, far, far less nausea. Less joint pain. (Joint pain and nausea are the first symptoms I get if I eat crosscontaminated products.) Better energy, though I would like to not get fatigued so easily with strenuous exercise. Surprisingly, my eyes used to feel sensitive, that all went away.

The more I stick to the diet, the easier it is to tell if I'm sick. I've learned what normal feels like.

http://www.ehow.com/list_7277388_causes-low-triglycerides_.html

it appears that it would be malabsorbtion/hyperthyroid....good luck

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It's good to know that you continued to feel better even after a year+ of being gluten free. I can only hope that this is the same for me, and I'll only have better feeling days to come! It's great to hear from people who are already so far along the healing journey.

The last time my trigs were checked (which was before going gluten-free) they were borderline high, and had been slowly rising for several years. My cholesterol levels have always been very good though. I think the highish levels are related to the birth control I've been taking for many years. Many medications can change your trig levels.

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Yes, very low triglycerides, in the absence of a super low-carb diet, is a sign that you are still not absorbing well. A year after dx, my triglycerides were 42. I was a huge carb/ sugar eater so this was a misleading sign of good health. I discovered I was casein intolerant as well and suspect that was causing continued malabsorption. Been casein free for several months now and remaining digestive issues have resolved. I will be curious to see where my triglycerides are next time I test. (I am eating much better now, following a mostly primal diet)

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I had abnormally low cholesterol levels because of the malabsorption. I assume the same could happen with triglycerides.

richard

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I too have triglycerides that are below the normal reference range even though I am hypothyroid and that usually raises your cholesterol. Score 1 for celiac. lol :rolleyes:

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