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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Chebe Revisted
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20 posts in this topic

I've been a big fan of Chebes bread mixes for pizza crust, breadsticks, flatbread. I guess I'm lazy but mixing all those differnt flowers and then having stuff turn out ptretty yucky turned me off of bread.

I lived fine without it. Tonight, however, I had a big craving for bread. For you in the know, the only bummer with Chebe is it doesn't get brown, has low eye appeal, and the middle is squishy.

Tonight while I was mixing up the batter, I heated the oven up to 400 degrees and stuck a well seasoned cast iron skillet in there. I patted out 4 rolls and 2 breadrolls in the meantime.

My oven shelves were situated at next to the highest and next to the lowest.

I took the piping hot cast iron skilled out of the oven and loaded my six pieces of bread in it. I cooked it for about 18 minutes on the low oven shelf, flipped them, and cooked the bread on the upper shelf for another 10 minutes, removed them and stuck them on a rack to cool.

They're the bomb!

They key with Chebe's is not adding more liquid. It should be crumbly. If you use a soft cheese vs. a hard cheese, cut down on the liquid called for. If it's humid, you don't need as much liquid. Start with maybe 3/4 of the liquid called for and start mixing and kneeding with your hands.

Anyway, I'm really happy with the results and thought I should share.

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Thanks so much for sharing your cooking method. I probably wouldn't have thought to use the cast iron and it sounds like it worked well?

I haven't tried the Chebe mix, but I see my grocery store carries it. I'm real tempted to run out and get some to go with the pot of beef stew I'm making for supper. My hubby and son would be thrilled! :D

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Also, if you let chebe sit out covered for a while after shaping it gets better. Leave it out for an hour or two. The end product is softer, doesn't get as hard on the outside, and cooks through more on the inside.

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Having followed both Marilyn and Bunz's suggestions before, we have enjoyed the CHEBE mixes very much.

Nothing like pulled pork on a cheesy roll. Hubs loved the hot dogs in a chebe blanket, too.

Recently, I transformed a gluteny-based old family recipe for a meat pie (made with ground lamb, toms, herbs, garlic, etc.).

Using the CHEBE pizza mix---I rolled it as flat as possible to resemble the flat wheat flour round the recipe calls for--and it was a close to my Grandmother's lamejun (aka Armenian "pizza")--as it could ever get.

I thought I had lost that taste treat forever.

Thanks, guys! ;)

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I'm real tempted to run out and get some to go with the pot of beef stew I'm making for supper. My hubby and son would be thrilled! :D

oh, you have got to try the chebe cheese rolls with your stew, B M---awesome! I used grated cheddar in mine. Enjoy!

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I made these for dinner last night as hamburger buns. My family hated them but said if I'd add garlic powder and make small rolls instead of big buns then they'd taste like Red Lobster biscuits. May have to try it again.

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If you use them as hamburger buns they have to be really, REALLY flat before you bake them, or else they're just all gooey and gross in the middle. Think pita bread.

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Here is how to make hamburger or sandwich rolls with Chebe that are more "breadlike."

Take a box of chebe bread mix. Add to the mix about 1/4 cup to 1/2 cup of whatever gluten free flour substitute(s) you wish, such as buckwheat, amaranth, sorghum, ground almond meal, brown rice flour, quinoa flour.

Add a small amount of salt, a dash.

Add a small amount of baking soda, about 1/4 teaspoon.

Add a pinch of cumin and a pinch of cinnamon or other sweet spice.

To the liquid part of the mixture, (the eggs, oil, water) in addition to what is called for on the box, you then add a dash of cider vinegar, an extra tablespoon of cooking oil, and an extra egg and/or a heaping tablespoon of yogurt. Depending on the flour used, you may or may not have to add just a bit more water. Don't forget the extra oil. Otherwise they are too dry.

You can also add a tablespoon of chia seed, if you wish. Highly recommended!

I use a combo of half amaranth and half buckwheat. I presoak this with the chia in some of the liquid, so the chia gels and the buckwheat softens, which makes it work better.

Make a dough out of the ingredients. At first it will seem too dry, keep stirring, then you will be able to knead it. It will become more and more doughlike as you work it. Knead until it is all blended and workable as a bread dough. Don't add too much water or it will be sticky, and you will have to add more tapioca mix or gluten-free flour to it.

Oil your hands and make doughballs in the desired shapes of chebe bread rolls.

Place doughballs on oiled cookie sheet or pan. If you are making an oblong sandwich roll, make it flatter than a regular sandwich bread dough shape. Then, take your finger and press down the center lengthwise to make a "groove," then take a knife and sliced gently into this groove. If you are making larger round sandwich rolls, press a dimple into the top, then slice a cross hatch shape into the roll. This helps the chebe rolls cook through completely.

Bake for the recommended time on the package, then check for doneness by taking a clean table knife and poking it into the roll to see if it comes out clean and not gummy. Return the rolls to the oven if they are not done yet. Typically, the larger rolls are taking a bit more time to bake, about 25 to 28 minutes. They will be lightly golden browned, and have a great "grain" scent.

Let cool and slice for sandwiches. :)

If you use amaranth as part of the mixture, you can keep these in the refrigerator for many days, stored in a ziplock bag, and they will reheat nicely. The flavors actually improve.

I have found you can also replace part of the grated cheese in the regular recipe with yogurt.

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Holy Chebe science, Batman!

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Yowzers.

I make 4 delicious rolls out of the mix. I love this mix because it is so easy.

I do not flatten them. I make them "rounded" --they look like hamburger rolls.

I do nothing special except add grated cheddar cheese and they come out squishy and moist.

Hmm...what am I doing differently and how do I get so lucky?

I dunno.....maybe I have a "magic oven" ?? :lol: :lol:

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You're just weird. :ph34r:

:P .....bunzie is just jealous I have a magic oven.....hehehe

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I haven't been back to my post. I got a little wrapped up with Hurricane Issac, even though it was just a tropical storm here.

Anyway. Back to the OP. If you find the buns are too gummy, you have a couple of choices I found out by accident.

If you make buns thin and freeze them, you can toast them in your toaster (I just have a pop up) or make the rolls thick and freeze them, then slice the frozen buns (not easy, but hey, you're used to that) then toast them. The sliced toasted buns pretty much rock. You can do a BLT, an egg salad, a burger, pretty much anything.

I make the breadsticks long so I can toast them after freezing them. (Just unplug the toaster if you have to use tongs to get them out.) Chebe breadsticks are great with soup or salad.

When I notice my sidekick is getting whiny, I pop one of the skinny buns in the toaster (on 5). He says it's just about like a slice of pizza.

Anyway, experiment a little. You might get some Holy Chebe moments to, Batman.

The Wright Brothers probably didn't get to fly the first plane they built. (My Irishman mentioned that to me the first time I got bummed with gluten-free baking.)

:)

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The Wright Brothers probably didn't get to fly the first plane they built. (My Irishman mentioned that to me the first time I got bummed with gluten-free baking.)

:)

True, true!

And when I get frustrated with it all, my Irishman always scolds me with "Rome wasn't built in a day" :lol:

The first few gluten-free loaves of breads we made? :blink: Most of them serve as door stops in the house. One holds up the bedroom window that keeps slamming shut.

P.S.

Glad hurricane Isaac did not give you any grief, Marilyn.

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:P .....bunzie is just jealous I have a magic oven.....hehehe

:P :P :P

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Having followed both Marilyn and Bunz's suggestions before, we have enjoyed the CHEBE mixes very much.

Nothing like pulled pork on a cheesy roll. Hubs loved the hot dogs in a chebe blanket, too.

Recently, I transformed a gluteny-based old family recipe for a meat pie (made with ground lamb, toms, herbs, garlic, etc.).

Using the CHEBE pizza mix---I rolled it as flat as possible to resemble the flat wheat flour round the recipe calls for--and it was a close to my Grandmother's lamejun (aka Armenian "pizza")--as it could ever get.

I thought I had lost that taste treat forever.

Thanks, guys! ;

Babe...will you share Grandmother's recipe?

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Babe...will you share Grandmother's recipe?

I know, right? Get crackin!

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oops, sorry, guys!

Just saw this. I've been down and out (damn gluten) but will

happily post it as soon as I can figure out what I did exactly to

convert it... :lol:

Be back shortly!!

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oops, sorry, guys!

Just saw this. I've been down and out (damn gluten) but will

happily post it as soon as I can figure out what I did exactly to

convert it... :lol:

Be back shortly!!

Sorry a lot you're not feeling well.

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Armenian Lamb Pie (Lamejun or lahmajoon)

This popular pie is “pizza” to Armenians.

It is traditionally made with a circular flat bread (think : a very pliable tortilla- type thing)

but I tried making it with the Chebe pizza dough.

I made a large flat square on a 15 X 10 rimmed non-stick baking sheet, the same as I do when I make other pizza. You can use a circular one, if you like.

So, I had to figure out the measurements as my Grams never measured a thing in her life while baking.

I found the book The Cuisine of Armenia by Sonja Uvezian had a recipe with actual ingredients, so I will post it here.

It's the same as Gram's!

Assemble your Chebe pizza dough

OR

I imagine you can use gluten-free white rice flour tortillas, if you prefer. I have not tried them yet.

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Combine the following in a large bowl:

1 lb. Ground lamb

a medium onion, FINELY chopped

¼ cup finely chopped green pepper.

1 medium ripe tomato, seeds removed and finely chopped

1 / 4 cup finely chopped flat leaf parsley

1 teaspoon finely chopped mint leaves (optional)

1 garlic clove, finely chopped

2 tablespoons tomato paste

1/8 teasponn cayenne

S and P to taste

dash of Paprika (optional )

Knead together.

Spread the meat mixture onto the pizza dough, leaving about a 1 /2 - inch border/edge.

(or if using tortilla rounds, about 1/3 cup of the mixture and spread, leaving some room left around the edges.)

Bake pizza for 14-15 minutes (check the tortillas at 11-12; they may be done faster)

and then

briefly put oven on BROIL –for about a minute, with the door slightly open---so the pie gets lightly browned and a teensy bit “crispy”

Can be served hot or cold, with lemon wedges or plain yogurt and crisp cucumbers and some spicy pickled veggies like gardinera or pepperoncinis. A Greek salad with feta also works!

It should resemble this picture:

http://georgefamily.net/food/?p=166

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