• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
  • Celiac.com Sponsor:
    Celiac.com Sponsor:

Just Starting Out, Afraid Of Cc
0

12 posts in this topic

Hi everyone. I'm just starting out on a gluten free diet...this is my husband's and my 3rd day off of it. (I have ADD and many signs of gluten intolerance and my husband has a lot of GI issues that doctors have been unable to find the cause for). We have a 3 year old who does not seem to be gluten intolerant in any way so she's finishing off our glutinous bread and cereals for us and then we won't buy anything else that contains gluten. However, in the meantime, I worry so much about accidental gluten exposure. I really want to give the gluten free diet an honest try, but I keep wondering what's the point if I'm getting glutened from accidental CC from making My daughters cereal or sandwiches or something. I do wash my hands and try to be careful. I guess what I'm wondering is, will minute amounts of it affect whether I improve or not on this diet? like my mother is having us over for dinner in a few days, and I told her about cc and such, but I'm still afraid that eating there will ruin the whole diet. Is a tiny amount of accidental gluten really that bad?

Also, my husband took a bit of convincing to get on this diet. Since we started, he has been completely gluten-free at home, but at work, he'll eat what they have (he works for a food company so they get free lunch) but he'll avoid anything with gluten. However, I need to get it across to him that even if he's eating beans and rice,for example, the cook could have touched breaded chicken and then prepared other plates on the same counter or without washing his or her hands, and that even that amount of gluten might sabotage our hard efforts. I offered to make his lunch everyday but he'd rather take advantage of the free lunch his work provides and thinks he's doing fine. I feel like I'm nagging him with all this....if anyone has some good online articles about how bad even tiny amounts of gluten can be, please post them so I can show them to my husband. Thank you, and I'm so glad I found this forum!! Reading the posts here have helped me immensely. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


I know a few people like you , who are going gluten-free for reasons other than Celiac. They try to be gluten-free & don't cheat, but they don't worry about minute cc like a person with Celiac has to. Not sure if that will work for ADD or not.

I'm assuming you don't want to get tested or have been tested & it was negative?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest with you, I don't think anyone should give up eating wheat/gluten unless they know they have a problem. Coeliacs don't have a choice. Why make problems for yourself if you don't need to? I can understand it if someone has been tested and knows they have a problem with either Coeliacs or wheat/gluten intolerance. You and your husband are at liberty to chose to omit wheat and gluten from your diet but unless you know your child has a problem I wouldn't restrict her diet as you could be storing up problems for later and also she could resent you for taking it out of her diet, especially when she sees what her friends eat! Taking things out of your diet that you don't need to and then re-introducing them later down the line can actually cause an intolerance to develop.

Hi everyone. I'm just starting out on a gluten free diet...this is my husband's and my 3rd day off of it. (I have ADD and many signs of gluten intolerance and my husband has a lot of GI issues that doctors have been unable to find the cause for). We have a 3 year old who does not seem to be gluten intolerant in any way so she's finishing off our glutinous bread and cereals for us and then we won't buy anything else that contains gluten. However, in the meantime, I worry so much about accidental gluten exposure. I really want to give the gluten free diet an honest try, but I keep wondering what's the point if I'm getting glutened from accidental CC from making My daughters cereal or sandwiches or something. I do wash my hands and try to be careful. I guess what I'm wondering is, will minute amounts of it affect whether I improve or not on this diet? like my mother is having us over for dinner in a few days, and I told her about cc and such, but I'm still afraid that eating there will ruin the whole diet. Is a tiny amount of accidental gluten really that bad?

Also, my husband took a bit of convincing to get on this diet. Since we started, he has been completely gluten-free at home, but at work, he'll eat what they have (he works for a food company so they get free lunch) but he'll avoid anything with gluten. However, I need to get it across to him that even if he's eating beans and rice,for example, the cook could have touched breaded chicken and then prepared other plates on the same counter or without washing his or her hands, and that even that amount of gluten might sabotage our hard efforts. I offered to make his lunch everyday but he'd rather take advantage of the free lunch his work provides and thinks he's doing fine. I feel like I'm nagging him with all this....if anyone has some good online articles about how bad even tiny amounts of gluten can be, please post them so I can show them to my husband. Thank you, and I'm so glad I found this forum!! Reading the posts here have helped me immensely. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I respectfully disagree, Flowerqueen. I believe it is just a myth that people will develop an intolerance to foods if they don't eat them for a long time. For example, when I was a kid, my Mom made me eat my vegetables. Once I was out of the house, I never ate broccoli again until I was in my 40's. Now I like broccoli although I hated it as a kid. But when I started eating it again after 30 years of avoiding it, I didn't develop an intolerance to it.

Also, the OP said she not only had ADD, but OTHER signs of gluten intolerance, as well as her husband having GI issues. I think gluten-free is a very wise decision for them both.

But Dandelion, you really DO have to avoid cross contamination for it to work. And your husband does too! Have you read the sticky "Newbie 101"? It will explain why this is so important, and it will explain how to accomplish it. If you can stay gluten-free, TRULY gluten-free, you may find that you both had a slew of symptoms that you never would have associated with gluten. It can't hurt, and it might well help.

Your other option is to get tested, if you have the insurance and know a GOOD doctor. You need to be eating gluten to be tested though. Read, read, read - as many threads as you can here. You will learn so much, and hopefully be on your way to better health.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you guys! I definitely understand going gluten free is a big undertaking and not so,etching to be taken lightly, however, I have done lots of research and the more I read about the symptoms of gluten intolerance, the more I think I have it. I have sleep problems like insomnia, bloating, very bad teeth with weak enamel, often tired and sluggish, plus my ADD.

Bartfull, thanks for understanding. :) I've done a lot of research and I really feel a gluten free diet will benefit my Husband and I. In fact, it's only day 3 and I already see a noticeable difference in the amount of bloating I have! Could be just coincidence though, but I'd like to think I'm improving.

I will definitely check out the info on this board, and forward it to my husband to check out.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Taking things out of your diet that you don't need to and then re-introducing them later down the line can actually cause an intolerance to develop.

Where did you read this information?

For example, I only eat foods like lobster, shrimp, mussels, oysters etc., once a year when I go to Cape Cod and I do not have an intolerance to them.

Not sure where this idea has come from because, in theory, this is not how a food intolerance develops at all.

You would have to be eating a food regularly for an intolerance to occur. To resolve a food intolerance, it is advised that you take it out for a few months, then reintroduce it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bartful, I was referring to the fact that they were taking her daughter off gluten even though she has not had any signs of having a problem with it!

I definitely think there is a problem with her own health, perhaps I had not phrased it properly or you had not read the post right through.

I respectfully disagree, Flowerqueen. I believe it is just a myth that people will develop an intolerance to foods if they don't eat them for a long time. For example, when I was a kid, my Mom made me eat my vegetables. Once I was out of the house, I never ate broccoli again until I was in my 40's. Now I like broccoli although I hated it as a kid. But when I started eating it again after 30 years of avoiding it, I didn't develop an intolerance to it.

Also, the OP said she not only had ADD, but OTHER signs of gluten intolerance, as well as her husband having GI issues. I think gluten-free is a very wise decision for them both.

But Dandelion, you really DO have to avoid cross contamination for it to work. And your husband does too! Have you read the sticky "Newbie 101"? It will explain why this is so important, and it will explain how to accomplish it. If you can stay gluten-free, TRULY gluten-free, you may find that you both had a slew of symptoms that you never would have associated with gluten. It can't hurt, and it might well help.

Your other option is to get tested, if you have the insurance and know a GOOD doctor. You need to be eating gluten to be tested though. Read, read, read - as many threads as you can here. You will learn so much, and hopefully be on your way to better health.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take your point about intolerances occurring through eating something regularly, as once your reach your tolerance max level you have a problem.

There are other problems that can arise from messing about too much with your diet. Many years ago my daughter had a VEGA test to see if she had any intolerances as she had very bad eczema. Her younger sister had a severe intolerance to dairy products when she was only 3 and we had used the VEGA method to see why she was being ill. When it pointed to dairy and took it out of her diet she recovered almost overnight so I had hoped that the VEGA method would help her older sister. They told us she was intolerant to cows milk, plus citric acid. Hoping for a similar recovery to her little sister we cut out the 'offending' foods. Sadly her eczema remained and cutting out citric acid led to her being intolerant to tomatoes as well (which we were warned might happen). She had been happily eating tomatoes and foods/drinks with citric acid in until then. If we'd left well alone, she would not be in this situation.

Where did you read this information?

For example, I only eat foods like lobster, shrimp, mussels, oysters etc., once a year when I go to Cape Cod and I do not have an intolerance to them.

Not sure where this idea has come from because, in theory, this is not how a food intolerance develops at all.

You would have to be eating a food regularly for an intolerance to occur. To resolve a food intolerance, it is advised that you take it out for a few months, then reintroduce it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take your point about intolerances occurring through eating something regularly, as once your reach your tolerance max level you have a problem.

There are other problems that can arise from messing about too much with your diet. Many years ago my daughter had a VEGA test to see if she had any intolerances as she had very bad eczema. Her younger sister had a severe intolerance to dairy products when she was only 3 and we had used the VEGA method to see why she was being ill. When it pointed to dairy and took it out of her diet she recovered almost overnight so I had hoped that the VEGA method would help her older sister. They told us she was intolerant to cows milk, plus citric acid. Hoping for a similar recovery to her little sister we cut out the 'offending' foods. Sadly her eczema remained and cutting out citric acid led to her being intolerant to tomatoes as well (which we were warned might happen). She had been happily eating tomatoes and foods/drinks with citric acid in until then. If we'd left well alone, she would not be in this situation.

Tho this doesn't have anything to do with the original question, I think you aren't understanding what we are saying.

One more example: People only eat watermelon for 2 months a year then go 10 without. They don't become intolerant to it because they weren't eating it for a while. Maybe she always had a problem with tomatoes that was masked by her other issues. When they cleared up, all that was left was the tomatoes? Also, I think people can develop allergies. Maybe she has an allergy to tomatoes?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im sorry everyone, I made it seem like my daughter would be on a strict gluten free diet too, but she isn't and won't be. I should have clarified better by saying that the house would be gluten free just to make things easier regarding cc concerns and such, but when she's at the babysitter's (who provides her lunch) or we're eating at someone's house she can eat whatever's served.

You all are making me think twice about not getting tested before we started this, though. My husband has been tested for several things but doctors haven't been able to figure out the cause of his GI issues(we hadn't thought to ask about celiacs or a gluten intolerance) and now we don't have insurance anymore, which is why we're doing the diet without getting tested, just trying to improve things on our own, for free.

Is there anything that could prove to us that we do have a gluten intolerance? Let's say we go through gluten withdrawal (looks like I might be...I've been dizzy and had an unusual breakout of exzema on just one spot of my hand), or that we notice measurable improvements on the diet, or we get a very bad reaction after a slip up...could any of those things indicate we have a gluten intolerance?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wouldn't like to say. Some people get worse before they get better. Others improve straight away, others struggle with puzzling symptoms for a long time, while their gut heals. It's a dilemma deciding whether to go gluten free without a test. You are the best judge of that. If you do decide to get tested, you will need to be eating gluten for at least 6weeks (regularly) before hand to get an accurate result. (so that is something else to consider, if you were rethinking about getting tested).

Im sorry everyone, I made it seem like my daughter would be on a strict gluten free diet too, but she isn't and won't be. I should have clarified better by saying that the house would be gluten free just to make things easier regarding cc concerns and such, but when she's at the babysitter's (who provides her lunch) or we're eating at someone's house she can eat whatever's served.

You all are making me think twice about not getting tested before we started this, though. My husband has been tested for several things but doctors haven't been able to figure out the cause of his GI issues(we hadn't thought to ask about celiacs or a gluten intolerance) and now we don't have insurance anymore, which is why we're doing the diet without getting tested, just trying to improve things on our own, for free.

Is there anything that could prove to us that we do have a gluten intolerance? Let's say we go through gluten withdrawal (looks like I might be...I've been dizzy and had an unusual breakout of exzema on just one spot of my hand), or that we notice measurable improvements on the diet, or we get a very bad reaction after a slip up...could any of those things indicate we have a gluten intolerance?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take your point about intolerances occurring through eating something regularly, as once your reach your tolerance max level you have a problem.

There are other problems that can arise from messing about too much with your diet. Many years ago my daughter had a VEGA test to see if she had any intolerances as she had very bad eczema. Her younger sister had a severe intolerance to dairy products when she was only 3 and we had used the VEGA method to see why she was being ill. When it pointed to dairy and took it out of her diet she recovered almost overnight so I had hoped that the VEGA method would help her older sister. They told us she was intolerant to cows milk, plus citric acid. Hoping for a similar recovery to her little sister we cut out the 'offending' foods. Sadly her eczema remained and cutting out citric acid led to her being intolerant to tomatoes as well (which we were warned might happen). She had been happily eating tomatoes and foods/drinks with citric acid in until then. If we'd left well alone, she would not be in this situation.

What is VEGA testing?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,044
    • Total Posts
      933,987
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,621
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    LouiseBea
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  •  

  • Topics

  • Posts

    •  I'm a new member and totally frustrated with Dapsone which has done absolutely nothing for my autoimmune skin disease.  This is a condition where the white blood cells attack the skin, and it's been on-going for 6 years.  Only 1 in 2,000 have this rare disease so zero research has been done unfortunately.  My dermatologist put me on a stronger dose which merely worsened it.  So back to the drawing board of what to do.  Redirecting the white blood cells must be an impossible task to figure out, but in this age of technology surely some doctor, chemist, etc., could come up with a solution? I've read where many people become antibiotic resistant and this may have happened to me.  I'm sick to death of my problematic skin, and any suggestions would be helpful.    
    • Hello and welcome It's true that there's a connection between thyroid conditions and celiac.  Loose stools and other digestion issues can be symptoms of celiac and you should definitely explore this issue with your doctor. This is the full celiac panel, try and get as many of these as available to you: Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgA
      Anti-Gliadin (AGA) IgG
      Anti-Endomysial (EMA) IgA
      Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA
      Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) IgA and IgG
      Total Serum IgA You must be eating some gluten each day up to the test date for an accurate response.  Here's some more info. Also check out the forum FAQ   Best of luck    
    • This is a really good serum for moms to reduce dark circles and Puffiness.My mom really liked it and she uses it everyday. I thought it might feel sticky as it dries or sinks in but it doesn’t.It minimizes the dark circles under your eyes and its results get better over time.You don't need to use a lot, a tiny amount will do. If you use too much it could feel sticky. Overall, Excellent product for sensitive skin! And its fragrance free. Very happy with dermalmd's serum and would recommend it to anyone with skin that tends to react to most other creams
    • Hello I m new at this forum. I am 24 years old. My mother and I have hypothyroidism and a day before I found out about celiac, the symptoms of celiac and hypothyroidism are almost similar and i have read that both diseases can go hand in hand. I have felt that every time when i eat macaroni and spicy rice  I have loose stool. I eat whole wheat loaf and that doesnt bother me at all. So I want to order tests for tTG IgA and immunoglobulin IgA . I m not on gluten free diet so do i need to have more gluten before tests???
  • Upcoming Events