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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Celiac: The Trendy Disease For Rich White People - Science 2.0
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42 posts in this topic

I'm saying that if you have a problem with the "moronic, useless articles" that appear here, and you really want to improve the site, you would discuss this with the person who is in charge of what goes on this forum site.

There's the misunderstanding again. I'm not at all looking to press for changes that I alone believe would benefit everyone. I'd like that IF everyone (well, most everyone) wanted a change, it'd be considered. 1st step has to be raising the question.

BTW, I don't appreciate the disingenous misuse of my "moronic, useless articles" phrase as if it applied to anything here. I was quite obviously referring to articles throughout the internet which were NOT linked to.

Hey I'm just saying there have been thousands of similarly moronic, useless articles about gluten-free on all sorts of blogs that WEREN'T given the publicity of a post here.

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Perhaps I wasn't clear with regard to my thoughts regarding Tom's proposal that Scott not post links to certain types of information.

I originally thought a link for the "Science 2.0" blog/article should not have a link posted on this site.

Upon more thought - I now believe that it is good for those within the Celiac Community to be aware of false information regarding Celiac Disease being posted on the net. It provides the opportunity to add facts to the conversation, rather than letting the false blogs/articles stand alone.

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There's the misunderstanding again. I'm not at all looking to press for changes that I alone believe would benefit everyone. I'd like that IF everyone (well, most everyone) wanted a change, it'd be considered. 1st step has to be raising the question.

BTW, I don't appreciate the disingenous misuse of my "moronic, useless articles" phrase as if it applied to anything here. I was quite obviously referring to articles throughout the internet which were NOT linked to.

what I'm am trying to suggest to you is that : if you have issues with this website,, rather than make comments in a post that a mod should do somethng, offer to help this be a better place. Talk to the person who makes the rules & purchases the press clipping service and offer to help.

I'm done arguing for tonight.

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There's the misunderstanding again. I'm not at all looking to press for changes that I alone believe would benefit everyone. I'd like that IF everyone (well, most everyone) wanted a change, it'd be considered. 1st step has to be raising the question.

Then you should ask.

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I now believe that it is good for those within the Celiac Community to be aware of false information regarding Celiac Disease being posted on the net. It provides the opportunity to add facts to the conversation, rather than letting the false blogs/articles stand alone.

Makes sense to me.

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The posting of links to articles in this forum is automated. Certain keywords in the article, including "gluten" and "celiac," cause a link to be posted. There is no subjective analysis. Use the word--get a post here.

I do weed out some stuff that really has no relevance. But this does have some merit. It is about how some members of the general public, including this misinformed author, perceive the diet.

Tom, the mods are doing what we have been asked to do by Scott. If that troubles you, you can send your suggestions to him via a PM, or:

http://www.celiac.com/glutenfreemall/contact_us.php

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...

I do weed out some stuff that really has no relevance. But this does have some merit.

..

Ahhh thanks Peter. That answers my original question.

Don't most of us agree that this article deserves no mention here at all?

...

That's the 1st sentence of my 1st(oops 2nd) post in this thread. Trying to see what others thought. So thanks Peter & GottaSki

...

Upon more thought - I now believe that it is good for those within the Celiac Community to be aware of false information regarding Celiac Disease being posted on the net. It provides the opportunity to add facts to the conversation, rather than letting the false blogs/articles stand alone.

There's certainly no shortage of false info re celiac disease % gluten-free online.

It could almost be a subcategory in the Publications section, if such a thing existed.

Should we have *more* threads w/ links to false info articles? (In an awareness-promoting sense I mean. Please don't anyone take that wrong)

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There's certainly no shortage of false info re celiac disease % gluten-free online.

It could almost be a subcategory in the Publications section, if such a thing existed.

Should we have *more* threads w/ links to false info articles? (In an awareness-promoting sense I mean. Please don't anyone take that wrong)

I think this site does end up with a lot of those. If they don't get posted through the auto system, then someone finds them and posts to ask about them.

And they may as well be fully discussed here, because ignoring them could easily be construed as supporting them.

But I also find them annoying, and can't be bothered to comment on them. B)

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I just found another one, but lost my first write up.

Science seen lacking for gluten free craze

http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Consumer_Trends/2012/08/Science_seen_lacking_for_glute.aspx?ID=%7BA77637C9-F272-4E0B-8C54-3D9AA6565135%7D&cck=1#.UEH5k6p23A8.twitter

8/31/12 Josh Sosland, FoodBusinessNews

NEW YORK

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Interesting, but as far as I know, there is no evidence that supports the theory that eliminating wheat from one's diet is detrimental in any way.

Many people do not consume whole wheat (or any grains for that matter) and they are neither celiacs nor gluten intolerants--and they live healthy lives.

I know many, but 2 examples are:

--- my friend who has MS and she has kept it at bay for 25 years by following a grain free diet (long before gluten-free was "faddish");

-----another is my husband who takes no meds, works out a gym 3x a week, walks 3 miles without breathing heavily, has no health issues and is in better shape than men half his age. (and he has great legs, too)

There are many "theories", many "agendas", many "opinions" out there--and right on here at c.com....but really,

in the end, whose business is it what people eat?

Your own.

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Well, Takala, I followed your links--all of them, but did not arrive at the same conclusion.

I have met Shelley Case. We talked at some length. I have read her writings. Gluten-free does not mean grain-free. Suggesting alternate grains as foods, such as rice, corn, quinoa, and others, is not in conflict with eating gluten-free. I found no evidence to suggest that she is promoting wheat. If you have a specific reference where she endorses wheat as a food, please provide the link.

I can put a link to anyone who has a website in any post I make. That does not mean that they agree with my position, or even know that the link exists.

Edited by psawyer
Irish posted while I was composing.
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From everything I have read, and information from doctors and dieticians, there is really no harm in following a gluten free diet, which is why I decided to make the whole house gluten free instead of making different things for the 2 of us.

On the other hand, gluten is not harmful to those who can tolerate it, and there is no sense in following a gluten free diet for health reasons if a person can tolerate it. I just do it because it eliminates the risk of cross contamination, and means that I only have to make one lot of everything, instead of 2 lots of everything when only 2 of us live here.

I run a local fb group for people in our community, and someone posted a link to a business she is starting up which is making all gluten free goods. It started in a different town 4 hours away and has really taken off, so she is starting it up here. She wanted to guage support for such a business, and was surprised at the amount of people who are interested, and I have already ordered 1 dozen cupcakes from her to pick up in 2 weeks time. She does them vegan as well, but only by order, but everything is gluten free. One of the comments was asking why the government allows gluten in foods when it's proven to be harmful to people, and they can simply take it out. I had to then tactfully explain what gluten was, and that it was not harmful to everyone, only those who cannot tolerate it. Like lactose, only a small portion of the shelf/fridge is set aside for lactose free because the majority of the population don't require it, so more space is set up for regular milk which is not harmful to the majority of people.

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Takala, I see absolutely nothing wrong with Case, who has done a ton of good for our community, being on this board. In fact, I think it's an excellent idea to have a celiac expert on a grain board.

richard

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That "board" of directors is the one governing an organization that is lobbying against gluten free. Hellooooo. They are funding studies by "expert" "professors of xxx with pHd's" which conclude a diet based on wheat is better.

Case has also been quoted in the regular media more times than I can count, as the Registered Dietician Celiac Expert claiming this:

Besides the hassle, you can end up with serious nutritional deficiencies. "Gluten-free doesn't necessarily equal healthy, especially when people yank vitamin-enriched and wholegrain foods from their diets and replace them with gluten free brownies," says Case. In fact, research suggests that those who forgo gluten may be more likely to miss out on important nutrients such as iron, B vitamins, and fiber.

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/gluten-free-diet

another one

"Gluten-free doesn't automatically equal healthy," says Shelley Case, RD, author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide. And these foods won't help you lose weight: They tend to be higher in calories and lower in fiber than regular grain products because they have to pack extra starch, fat, and sugar to make them palatable, Case says. Also, most are not enriched with iron and B vitamins as are other refined grain products, so you may miss out on key nutrients.

http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/food-labels-really-mean-160500128.html

There's that phrase, "research suggests.... " again.

And the "most are not enriched... so you may miss out on key nutrients"

I had never even paid much attention at all to Case, until she kept getting quoted in the media, implying that a gluten free diet using any sort of gluten free baked good was less nutritious than a regular diet.

Case getting quoted by another registered dietician, Lisa R Young, PhD:

GLUTEN FREE. Gluten free products are on the rise but not everyone needs to eat gluten free, and gluten free does not mean that a food is healthier. Gluten free diets are important for people with celiac disease or people who cannot tolerate gluten. Gluten free cookies, however, are still cookies and these foods DO have calories. In fact, many gluten free products often have more calories than their non-gluten free counterparts. As my expert colleague Shelley Case, RD, author of Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide says

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I agree with this:

If you are eating a poor diet, with lots of donuts, pizza, bagels, and so forth, and switch to a diet with lots of gluten-free cookies, donuts, bagels and pizza, well, you now have an unhealthy gluten-free diet. In fact, in this case, it may be less healthy since many of the gluten-free substitutes have more fat and calories than the gluten ones.

A gluten-free diet can be better and more healthy, or not.

If you go gluten-free by changing your eating habits, not just by substituting poor gluten-free choices, you will have a healthier diet.

It is really about what types of foods you choose to eat, not whether the specific choices are gluten-free or not.

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If you go gluten-free by changing your eating habits, not just by substituting poor gluten-free choices, you will have a healthier diet.

That's the truth. Amen.

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Lately I say things like, "When I was diagnosed with celiac disease...", even though I never got tested by a doctor. I am SELF diagnosed, but if I say that no one takes me seriously. The way I say it, I'm not lying exactly, just heading off the misconceptions.

I do the same thing, and was very annoyed by this article. I'm on an island with doctors who seem to know nothing about celiac disease and have this misconception that celiac disease can only occur in white people. This kind of thing just makes it harder for me to get a proper diagnosis.

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