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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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I've had roommates for the last two months for the first time since going gluten free and was doing good keeping the kitchen clean and feeling good until the second week of classes.

We keep dishes and food separate. My silverware is in a microwave cart away from everything else. I move all dishes they leave in the sinks or counters to the dishwasher which I don't use. I wipe down the counters and scrub the sinks multiple times everyday. I've started doing before each time I get anything out. We have separate dish towels and brushes.

I'm having some issues with the roommates and asked them to keep up with the kitchen because it was making me sick. They said they would and that they wipe down the counters everytime but neither are true and dishes haven't been done in over a week now and the dishwasher can't be closed anymore and I'm running out of space to stack all of their stuff.

What more could I do to keep things clean? Before school started I did everyones dishes and all the cleaning but I just don't have time and I don't think it'll get through to them to keep up with cleaning the kitchen until I get sick or past my breaking point of patience.

I don't want to cause drama with the roommates and just keep their stuff out of the way and my areas as clean as I can expecting/knowing that the roommates won't clean as much as they say they do.

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Honestly, I doubt they'll ever do what is necessary to live safely and courteously with a Celiac. Of course, I could be absolutely wrong-but thinking back to my college days-people were either on the clean wagon or off, and if they aren't on I sincerely doubt they'll start now.

I'd just suck it up and do whats necessary to keep myself safe. Some days that would mean cleaning the entire kitchen.

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Get a couple of big tubs with lids and put their dishes in them and stick them in their rooms. Or put your own personal cooking supplies in one and put that in your room with the door locked. You could also go the route of getting rid of all but one or two sets of everything they use, like 2 plates, 2 glasses, 2 coffee mugs, 2 spoons etc in the shared kitchen and keep the things you use in your room. That way they will have to do their dishes to be able to eat.

It is too bad you took responsibility for doing the kitchen duties before classes started cause you spoiled them and they will likely expect you to do all of it for ever.

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I do all the cleaning around here for everything. We all have normal allergies I just prefer to keep the place clean instead of popping tons of allergy pills.

I don't have confirmed celiacs but a confirmed wheat allergy with celiacs symptoms so im completely gluten free.

I don't think they've been using flours at all but could other things be getting into the air by just being left sitting in an open dishwasher? Something obviously caused my insides to turn to yellow mush and was super tired with headaches and sick in the mornings. Finally feeling closer to normal again and trying to keep it that way.

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Maintaining celiac precautions ultimately has to fall onto the person with the issue. I am not sure you really can ask a roommate (non-spouse/child) to go above and beyond what a regular college roommate would do. Each of us has to take on the role of protecting ourselves, making sure we have safe food when we go to events, etc. I just do not think we can expect others to do this for us. If the roles were reversed I am not sure I would be willing to avoid flour, use special dishes, etc, especially not when I was in college.

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On the other hand, roommates that let their crap pile up until its overflowing onto the counter and overflowing the dishwasher are being downright nasty and rude, completely aside from the gluten issue. I second the suggestion that you remove all but two of everything, if it's all yours. Then they'll have to wash to eat. If it's all theirs, put it in a bin in their room, and tell them before you do.

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Are you in housing that is associated with the university/college you're attending, or is it a private apartment that you rented? If it's on campus you should be able to talk to the housing office about the issues and your illness. They would be expected to find you another living arrangement considering the circumstances.

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