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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Pizza
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kellienye    0

Hi, I am new to this forum!

My husband was diagnosed recently and I think I have managed to find recipes for most things except for pizza! I was wondering if there are any good brands in the store or where I could find a good recipe. I am going to be making a trip to whole foods here this week since they have a full gluten-free isle, not really sure what to expect lol.

Thanks :)

Kellie

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sa1937    324

Hi, I am new to this forum!

My husband was diagnosed recently and I think I have managed to find recipes for most things except for pizza! I was wondering if there are any good brands in the store or where I could find a good recipe. I am going to be making a trip to whole foods here this week since they have a full gluten-free isle, not really sure what to expect lol.

Thanks :)

Kellie

Welcome to the forum, Kellie! While I have been experimenting with lots of from-scratch recipes, you might want to first try a mix. Gluten-Free Pantry makes a French Bread Mix that makes pretty darn good pizza (recipe is on the package). You can get a couple of large pizza crusts from one package. Price is reasonable, too, considering that prepared pizza crusts are pretty expensive.

I pre-bake the crusts (stuck one in the freezer for next time around)...of course, this depends on how many people you need to serve. Top as desired and then bake again. At least this is my preferred way to make them.

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ENF    8

Bisquick Pancake and Baking Mix, Gluten Free version, is delicious - and directons for making pizza crust with it are on the box.

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GottaSki    459

We like Bob's Red Mill Pizza Mix - it makes enough for two pizzas, so I usually make one and save the second dough ball in the fridge for up to a week to make another.

I'd second the suggestion to stick with a mix rather than a recipe in these early days - gluten free baking can be very tricky for even accomplished bakers.

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IrishHeart    1,633

These guys gave you good options for making your own crusts, but if you look in the Whole Foods store's freezer section, Against The Grain makes two pizzas: 3 cheese and Pesto. And Glutino makes a decent personal size pizza...and crusts, too, I believe. Both good --if you feel like keeping some ready -made ones in the freezer. They are good in a pinch when I could not bake a crust in advance (or someone was late coming home from golf. :D )

When you feel like baking your own pizza dough, there are many good ones to be found. Google away! Mary Capone, Jules Shepherd, Peter and Kelli Bronski, the Gluten Free girl, just to name a few.

Welcome to the forum! :) If you need any more help, just ask!

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kellienye    0

Thank you everyone for the comments, really helps a lot to try some different options to see what we like best :)

These guys gave you good options for making your own crusts, but if you look in the Whole Foods store's freezer section, Against The Grain makes two pizzas: 3 cheese and Pesto. And Glutino makes a decent personal size pizza...and crusts, too, I believe. Both good --if you feel like keeping some ready -made ones in the freezer. They are good in a pinch when I could not bake a crust in advance (or someone was late coming home from golf. :D )

When you feel like baking your own pizza dough, there are many good ones to be found. Google away! Mary Capone, Jules Shepherd, Peter and Kelli Bronski, the Gluten Free girl, just to name a few.

Welcome to the forum! :) If you need any more help, just ask!

hmmm coming home late from golf sounds familiar lol!!!!

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love2travel    396

My favourite recipes are those you can roll out rather than spread. One good one is:

http://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/pizzasflatbreadswraps/r/GFPizzaCrust.htm?nl=1

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Takala    413

Chebe mixes, tapioca based, either the pizza or the regular bread box can be used to make a pizza crust. Good for those who want a chewy crust, can tolerate dairy, and have allergies to some of the other grains or can't stand bean flour tastes.

I put olive oil on the bottom of the pan before patting the crust into it, as well as sprinkling a little bit of safe gluten-free blue cornmeal, if I can find some (I'm very sensitive to cross contamination). Another gluten-free grain could be used, this adds a toasted grain flavor to the result like in regular pizza.

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luvs2eat    60

I'm a fan of the Namaste pizza crust mix that I find in the health food store (and even found a discounted bag at T.J. Max once!). I make the entire bag which is supposed to make two 12 to 14 inch crusts except that I make about 5 or 6 personal pizza crusts, bake 'em, and freeze 'em.

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jage    0

pizza!

Deby's and Outside the Breadbox make good crusts, although they are Denver companies and I don't know where their distributions stops.

My next favorite is Schar, which were on the east coast months before being here in Denver, so it's likely you can get them. They are 3rd because they are thicker and slightly dry/chewy, but they are good none the less and get bonus points for being non-refrigerated.

Last is Kinnikinick (sp?) which are square and good, but very thick and high in calories comparatively. They are also very sweet.

I have some pizza mix to roll my own, but haven't had the courage yet to mix.

As far as recipes, warm the crust, remove then we use 1/2 bottle of Meditalia (King Sooper/Kroger) "Roasted Egplant Tapenade" (tomato allergy) and coat the crust, rip up or shred some cheese, add toppings (raw generally, all vegetarian), more cheese and bake at 375

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