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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Gi Or Nutritionist/allergist? Which Would Be Better?
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Hi all

So, while I have so far avoided any real testing aside from initial screening for Celiac a few years ago (I'm technically self-diagnosed, with clear evidence), I think it's time I was properly tested/screened for the other food intolerances that are popping up. I seem to be intolerant to casein, soy, and possibly eggs, quinoa, and who knows what else.

For those who have gone through this, would you recommend I see a GI to checking things out from the gut angle, or to see an allergist/immunologist/nutritionist/naturalist (they all seem to blend together these days) to test/figure out what I'm actually sensitive to and what to be done from a diet angle.

Also, any advice on reliable testing for intolerances?

I live in Toronto, Canada, have pretty good health insurance. A GI would likely be covered by medicare if I was referred. I'd have to look into whether my insurance will cover allergist/etc.

FYI, I have never had an endoscopy done to test for Celiac (vili damage). I didn't want to wait for the test when I went on the gluten-free diet. Now, the last thing I want to do is ruin 3 years of healing by doing a gluten challenge to get proper testing done.

I am willing to go back on milk/soy/etc for testing purposes.

Thank you!

Peggy

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There are no medical tests for food intolerances that I am aware of.

If you can limit your diet initially to things you know are safe foods for you (plain, whole foods, not processed), and then add additional foods one at a time while keeping a food and symptom diary, you should be able to identify the suspects. Of course you drop everything you react to. You might try testing the major food allergens first before moving on to the other lesser known problem foods. This is the only sure-fire way I know. An allergist can only test for allergies, and food intolerances and allergies are most often not co-existent (although they may be - i.e., some celiacs are also allergic to wheat, for example).

Celiacs often show a response to many foods in allergy testing that they are not actually allergic to, just reactive, Some posters have used this testing as a basis for what foods to test first on their elimination diet. If you are not able to eat a food currently, it does not mean you will never be able to eat it.

When you first went gluten free, did you use probiotics/digestive enzymes/L-glutamine or other means to heal up your leaky gut. If new intolerances are still popping up it might be a sign that your gut is not properly healed and additional foods are leaking into your blood stream in a partially digested state. The place to start is with the gut when it comes to preventing food intolerances. (from personal experience :rolleyes: ).

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