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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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ScottR13

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I have been getting chronic yeast infections in spots all over my body. I'm fed up with using antibiotic cream just to have a new spot pop up else where. I am strictly gluten-free (except being Glutenized once in a while) and I have eliminated all my allergies that I discovered & tested for ( Wheat, Barley, Rye,(oates), Coffee, Legumes, Caffeine, and Oranges).

I'm wondering if anyone else has this problem and found the culprit? Thanks in advance for any possible solutions or advice.

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Are you sure it's yeast infection spots that you have? Have you read about Celiac DH? Dermatitis Herpetiformis is the skin form of Celiac and it would be very sensitive to the cross contamination of gluten and it also can be sensitive to iodine. Would you mind describing your rash? Or spots? Do they itch? Burn? Sting? Are they worse at night? Do they weep or ooze? Has your Dr. said this is a yeast infection? Many people with DH do not know they have it. Often we are treated for fungus, yeast, impetigo, neurotic excoriation, anti-virals, antibiotics and all sorts of medications that will not work because the only thing that treats DH is gluten free and for some it is important to limit iodine to heal. Thyca.com is a low iodine diet if you find that your rash is sensitive to iodine.

Check out the DH forum. There is a photo bank for the various presentations of the rash.

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I have been getting chronic yeast infections in spots all over my body. I'm fed up with using antibiotic cream just to have a new spot pop up else where. I am strictly gluten-free (except being Glutenized once in a while

Hi Scott and welcome!

You mention 2 things:

(1) yeast infections in spots all over and

(2) being glutened "once and a while". :( How often is that?

If you do have a yeast infection, well, that needs to be treated by medications and diet (meds such as diflucan, etc.) Topical treatments do not eradicate yeast. You need to see a doctor who understands how to treat candida, IMHO

If you do have a yeast infection, that is a different beast than a gluten-induced rash. You COULD have a gluten rash (such as the ones I get, but it is not "classic DH") OR you could have dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), an extremely itchy rash -- weepy blisters. The rash is chronic, which means it continues over a long period of time. (this is what Eatmeat4good mentions).

We cannot be sure what you are dealing with here.

Can you give us a little more information so we can try and help?

If you are being glutened consistently, then it may not be yeast, but a gluten-induced rash.

If you have been DXed with candida, that's a separate health condition.

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I agree that it may be DH...but, then again, it might just be areas of yeast overgrowth, which CAN be treated with over-the-counter medications used for Athlete's Foot (sorry, IrishHeart, but I've treated numerous family members and friends for this problem successfully without oral antibiotics). For the areas on your skin that need to be treated, I've had the best success with the Athlete's Foot medications that contain Clotrimazole. You have to apply it TWICE daily for a minimum of 60 days...or, otherwise, it will come back! If you can stand applying the medication for 90 days, so much the better. However, you also need to either take probiotics or eat yogurt several times a day to address the underlying problem, which is yeast overgrowth. Your body may be telling you that you're eating too many simple carbohydrates....or you may be prediabetic.

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I agree that it may be DH...but, then again, it might just be areas of yeast overgrowth, which CAN be treated with over-the-counter medications used for Athlete's Foot (sorry, IrishHeart, but I've treated numerous family members and friends for this problem successfully without oral antibiotics). For the areas on your skin that need to be treated, I've had the best success with the Athlete's Foot medications that contain Clotrimazole. You have to apply it TWICE daily for a minimum of 60 days...or, otherwise, it will come back! If you can stand applying the medication for 90 days, so much the better. However, you also need to either take probiotics or eat yogurt several times a day to address the underlying problem, which is yeast overgrowth. Your body may be telling you that you're eating too many simple carbohydrates....or you may be prediabetic.

I am no fan of antibiotics --as you well know--I am all for PRObiotics. I am the probiotics pusher on here! :)

But we have no idea what he is dealing with. He refers to his issues as "allergies" for starters. Not celiac.

THIS IS HIS FIRST POST. We know nothing about Scott yet or his medical history.

I do not treat people and I am no doctor.

I suggested he may need to be seen by a doctor simply because he has provided no information except for what he calls "yeast spots". ??

I cannot see them and I do not know what they may be.

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I agree with your statements, IrishHeart--I was just remarking on your statement that antibiotics cannot cure yeast infections of the skin, because I know that Clotrimazole can do just that. This man needs to be seen by a doctor, because I do believe that he may be prediabetic, since he's having difficulty treating the skin infections.

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As far as I know, clotrimazole is an anti-fungal, not an antibiotic, although it acts like an antibiotic. It would not be available in over-the-counter forms if it were an antibiotic. :unsure:

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I agree with your statements, IrishHeart--I was just remarking on your statement that antibiotics cannot cure yeast infections of the skin, because I know that Clotrimazole can do just that. This man needs to be seen by a doctor, because I do believe that he may be prediabetic, since he's having difficulty treating the skin infections.

I'm sorry, Rose, but I said he needs to be seen by a doctor if he has candida.

I did not say that "antibiotics cannot cure the yeast infections of the skin".

What I did say was he may need anti-fungals such as Diflucan. That's a different treatment protocol than antibiotics.

Yeast is nasty bugger to eradicate. I know 2 people who have battled it for YEARS, even with antifungals, antibiotics and topicals. It did not finally resolve until they also included probiotics and went gluten-free and healed a leaky gut.

I do not think treating a skin manifestation of yeast by topical antibiotic cream will eliminate the yeast entirely. Just MHO

Nowhere did I say "take oral antibiotics" ----because I do not think they are a good thing, unless absolutely necessary.

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Oh, IrishHeart, we're bandying about semantics. I shouldn't rely on my memory--what I was disagreeing with was the following statement: "Topical treatments do not eradicate yeast." As I stated above, I've had great success when recommending that friends and family use Clotrimazole ointment to treat yeast infections of the skin--really, it works! However, you were perhaps referring to the fact that topical treatments do not eradicate yeast within a person's system, which is quite true. I believe that the problem is systemic and that yeast infections of the skin are simply indicative of a larger problem inside (hence, the probiotics, changes in diet, and suggestion that a doctor be seen about prediabetes). I think we're actually on the same page on this matter....but semantics is/are the crux of the problem. Forgive me, dear IrishHeart, for starting a war of words.

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Forgive me, dear IrishHeart, for starting a war of words.

oh come now, when do we ever fight, dear Rosie? never! xxoo

I was indeed referring to candida albicans, which will give someone thrush or some very uncomfy genitalia. :unsure:

And I wanted to make the distinction that diflucan is an antifungal, not an antibiotic. (I do not see how this is just a matter of semantics, but one of two different treatment protocols.)

I do not disagree with you that you can treat some conditions topically, but I have no knowledge of yeast medications so, nor do we know how the OP was diagnosed with it, so I always suggest someone see a doctor if that is involved.

As always, I respect your thoughts and send my best! ;)

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Thanks to all replies. It is a Yeast infections as diagnosed by my Doctor. I put Clotrimazole and Betamethasone on areas twice daily. They take along time to go away but then they pop up in a different spot.

As for being Glutenized, I have very obvious signs when it happens (Acne, Arthritis flare ups, Acid Reflux, Psoriasis, ect...). It's doesn't happen enough to weaken my immune system to cause yeast infections like this. Unfortunetly I live in a area where Doctors have no idea Gluten Allergies exist, let alone how to deal with Yeast infections with anything other than medication. I ordered my own allergy tests (I work in a lab @ my Doctors office) thru him and he has know clue what they are or that they even existed.

Basically I'm on my own here and running out of ideas. I don't believe Candida is a illness all of it's own, something is wrong (underlying issue ex: Hidden Food/Chemical Allergy) that is allowing yeast to grow out of control.

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