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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Is It Safe To Vacuum Up Gluten?

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We have some wall plaster on the floor behind some furniture left from before going gluten free...how would we go about getting rid of this? normally we would vacuum but will that send this stuff into the air at all?

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Maybe. Maybe not. It would vary from vacuum to vacuum, based on how good the filter is. If you are worried, I would consider using a face mask during the actual process. Then stay out of the room for an hour while any remaining dust settles.

But, honestly, it is not something that worries me.

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With the average vacuum, I would not do it. I ruined my new central vac picking up sheet rock dust and the company said it was not made to pick that up. Vacuums are not made to pick up powder they said. Of coarse if it is an incindental amount I wouldn't worry about the vacuum.

I suggest someone else use the vacuum. Most vacuums do put dust into the air. To minimize that I wonder if you could use a special filter bag- if they have one for your vac. Change the bag before someone vacuums and when you are done.

If you can find noone else to vacuum, that does not have a gluten problem, I say the mask would be a good idea. I might pick it up with gloves and mask and small broom. I might vacuum. I would also rinse off everything used afterward. I would stay out of the room and revacuum several times before I was really happy with it.

I would say, for your information, that I think this is very cautious, and would satisfy me if I had the need.

I

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:) since I am WAY too cautious...I would also wet mop/wet wipe surfaces down and either wash the mop and rags on sanitize or use disposable things like paper towels...

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I have gotten ill from the dust from sheetrock. If its not cleaned up, its the bad gift that keeps on going. I know since I am a property manager of old cottages that often have needed repair.

If you can either wear a heavy duty mask with goggles or have someone else take a dampened paper towel(s) to pick up the sheetrock granules, and then just throw them away into a plastic bag, then it would reduce the amount that goes into the air from vacuuming.

You can buy vacuum cleaners that put very little dust into the air. I just got one from a used vacuum cleaner place, which reduced the cost to half.

I agree with cleaning the rest of the room. I would use a heavy duty mask while doing it, or have someone else do it.

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We live in the basement apartment of my in laws house..they could do it but i would be too paranoid about stuff in the air after. maybe i'll use wet paper towels to pick up the bit that's there and then the VERY small bit after i'll vacuum ...like so small i can't hardly see it lol it's almost behind the bookcase so it's not anything major it was just left from a minor repair. i might be able to do this without the vacuum we'll see. I had cleaned out the floor of our jeep a couple months ago using a dust buster..you know..the hand held things? well we had just bought it and i forgot it just has a compartment..when i opened it some dust came up and i freaked =\ Actually ..maybe that made me ill beginning of august hmmm Either way the thing couldn't pick it all up..was useless so we trashed it anyhow lol

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This reminds me...we still have holes in our walls that need repairing..how should we go about this? i know most plasters available out there have gluten..is there a "recipe" to make some at home or anything?

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I thought that someone said in another thread i saw that a normal mask isn't good enough when sanding that stuff that you need something that filters? =\ Is there possibly any brand out there gluten free? I don't want to have to worry about it =\ then i also have to worry about clean up after.

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You need a vacuum cleaner with a good filtration system and even better a HEPA filter and that should do the trick. I would not advise dampening the plaster first, especially with an upright vacuum cleaner as it could damage the mechanics. For added protection use a face mask, you can also buy these with filters (from a DIY store). Of course, it would be better if someone else did the vacuuming for you but even then I would still advise a vacuum cleaner with a good filtration system so the particles are not left in the air, as this kind of dust takes ages to settle.

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Naw what i'm saying is the little bit there i can probably get almost all of it with the damp paper towel and any miniscule stuff left could easily be vacuumed and practically unaffected by any damp towel.

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Sheetrock dust has gluten in it? I went to look at houses with my friends just for fun and we went to one that was in the middle of being built. As we were walking around everything was covered in some sort of dust( Sheetrock, wood...?!) I was obviously breathing it in, I could feel it in my lungs. Later that night my eyes got all swollen and red, itchy and watery. My eczema got really bad and my throat was itching/closing. Thought it was an allergic reaction to the dust, is it possible it was from gluten??!!! I usually have gastric issues, not that kind though.

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Wow! My husband and I have been renovating our home for the past couple years, off and on. I knew I was sensitive/allergic to the dust, but never imagined it was gluten. I just cleaned up some mess after a demo a week or so ago and wore a mask and gloves, but still didn't feel great afterwards.

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I had NO idea there was gluten in sheet rock! :blink: This has been a really eye opening thread.

We live in a 90 year old house, which has plaster and lath instead of sheet rock. Anyone know if old plaster has gluten in it as well?

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I had NO idea there was gluten in sheet rock! :blink: This has been a really eye opening thread.

We live in a 90 year old house, which has plaster and lath instead of sheet rock. Anyone know if old plaster has gluten in it as well?

I lived in a 130 year old house for 26 years and moved out almost 1 year ago. I did work on that house many times and I had horsehair plaster and sheet rock

all over the place. I am an extremely sensitive, diagnosed Celiac who nearly died from this disease. I hit the wall with Celiac in that house and I recovered well in that house. It was never, ever an issue. Unless you decide to snort it up your nose, and the dry wall does indeed have a gluten component to it, then this should not be a problem for anyone. Not all sheet rock is a problem. It can easily be vacuumed up but if it is a large amount, a wet dry vac would do better.

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Ok so since it was a rather small area and just a dusting of the wall plaster i put a bandanna with wax paper underneath it (between my mouth and nose and bandana) for a makeshift mask. wore vinyl powder free gloves and took duct tape and picked it up a bit at a time with that...that worked really well for the majority of it...then anything little left over i vacuumed. it would be such a miniscule amount i have my doubts it would be worrisome. i couldn't see anything anymore. and now the window is open.

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Ok so since it was a rather small area and just a dusting of the wall plaster i put a bandanna with wax paper underneath it (between my mouth and nose and bandana) for a makeshift mask. wore vinyl powder free gloves and took duct tape and picked it up a bit at a time with that...that worked really well for the majority of it...then anything little left over i vacuumed. it would be such a miniscule amount i have my doubts it would be worrisome. i couldn't see anything anymore. and now the window is open.

That's perfect! Duct tape is just awesome, isn't it? I think Celiac is the only thing duct tape doesn't fix..... :P

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That's perfect! Duct tape is just awesome, isn't it? I think Celiac is the only thing duct tape doesn't fix..... :P

I agree! lol You can do practically anything with it!

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I agree--a vacuum cleaner with a hepa filter is the best. I bought a used refurbished one and its great! However I have also used a shop vac with good success. Thing is though that when you open it up you really need to be suited up with your mask, gloves and a clothes you plan to wash.

You can use the wet paper towel method, and then let it dry before using the vacuum.

Meanwhile I use one of those masks with carbon nozzles and extra cotton filter on the outside for nasty jobs like that. It does work.

As far as plaster goes, you can get the old fashioned kind that is just plaster and I think with a trace amount of corn. You mix it yourself. Again use the mask and gloves when mixing (and mix it outside) just in case there is CC. It does work! Then when it comes to sanding the patch, use the wet sanding method so the dust does not go into the air--and again the mask etc.

I always wash my clothes afterwards again to avoid CC.

Good luck! It should work out fine.

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