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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Why I Still Eat Bread...
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81 posts in this topic

Sandra, I think the point that everyone is trying to make here, but has not been clearly stated for you yet, is this. If gluten makes you feel sick, you stop eating it, and you feel better, then there is nothing else wrong with you.

As far as I know, and I'm pretty sure everyone else on the board will agree with me, although correct me if I'm wrong guys- if you stop eating gluten and your symptoms go away, you're done! There's no underlying disease that will go dormant when you stop eating gluten and sneak up and attack you ten years down the road. Only gluten intolerance can make you sick when you eat gluten. Epilepsy, COPD, endometriosis- these things do not cause temporary gluten sensitivity. Only gluten sensitivity causes gluten sensitivity.

The most effective way for you to figure this out is this- Go gluten free for six months. You're a dancer, you said, and observing a healthy diet is clearly very important to you for that, so a fruit/veggies/meat/dairy diet is good. In six months, eat some of that vital wheat gluten. Get sick? There's your answer.

By the way, I TOTALLY understand your problem with feeling starving. I went an entire year without being able to sleep through the night because I would have to wake up and eat. The first few months I was gluten free I ate about 6,000 calories a day, and would have eaten more if I had more time in the day. It really will get better, I promise.

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Thanks for the link, I have a question about the article, it says:

"The main histology characteristic of [wheat sensitive] patients was eosinophil infiltration of the duodenal and colon mucosa"

My GI said he didn't find any in the endoscopy biopsy he took back in Feb, also my CBC is quite normal (overall WBC was rather low).

Is there a specific test to check for eosinophil infiltration?

Hi Sandra,

They do that my using a microscope and counting the cells of the biopsy samples.

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I think the most significant part of the abstract GeeEff linked to is this:

Our data confirm the existence of non-celiac WS as a distinct clinical condition. We also suggest the existence of two distinct populations of subjects with WS: one with characteristics more similar to celiac disease and the other with characteristics pointing to food allergy.

That is, they suspect there are two subsets of even non-celiac wheat sensitivity, one more akin to celiac disease (with the eosinophil infiltration which you did not appear to have on your biopsy), and one more similar to a food allergy, which may be where you fall.

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Sandra, I think the point that everyone is trying to make here, but has not been clearly stated for you yet, is this. If gluten makes you feel sick, you stop eating it, and you feel better, then there is nothing else wrong with you.

I understand, I'm avoiding it now, I only ate it again for the two tests I had to do (the Carcinoid and redoing the Celiac profile)

What I don't know what to do now is how to handle things like, restaurants/eating out, and things like that. My mom asked me what do I do if I have to go to some social gathering and there is food there, and what if the world's food supply runs out and there is only bread left, then what do I do? (it's silly but she actually asked me that and I didn't know how to answer)

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and what if the world's food supply runs out and there is only bread left, then what do I do?

If, God forbid, this should occur, I think we would have a lot worse problems than eating bread, Sandra. :blink::D

As those before have said....take baby steps. Eat before you go to a social function or bring some snacks with you. And most restaurants can find something that's gluten free for you. Call and talk to the manager, during non-busy hours about what your options are. Salads are always a good choice...and bring your own salad dressing.

You will do just fine, once you get the hang of the diet. ;)

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Hi Sandra,

Try searching for restraunts in your town that serve gluten-free foods. There are usually some around. P.F Chang's, Outback Steakhouse, are a couple chains, there are many more now. Check non-chain restraunts also. There is a certification program called GFRAP that certifies restraunts as gluten-free food providers. Their website lists certified restraunts. But you can find them by searching for gluten-free and your town name also.

If there is only bread left I guess there won't be any butter either.l So we will have to eat toast with mud instead. Yum, sounds great mom! :)

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