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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

If It Isn't Just Gluten, What Is It?
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8 posts in this topic

I have been suffering from various weird symptoms of what I think must be various vitamin deficiencies

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It is quite possible that if you used your same utensils and same bread pan that you cross-contaminated your gluten free loaf with gluten crumbs which are very hard to get rid of. Porous utensils (think wooden and plastic), cutting boards,etc., can all harbor gluten.

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Burping can be a side effect of GERD - are you still having other GERD symptoms?

Celiac or gluten intolerance could be causing your GERD, but it would take a while to clear up after going gluten free. GERD or GERD-like symptoms can also be caused by some medications.

Do you have other gastro symptoms when you eat dairy, like diarrhea?

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Aqua, you need to read the thread, "Newbie 101". It'll teach you all of the places gluten can hide. As Mushroom said, it could very well be cross contamination. Pans, utensils, your toaster, all of these things can hold gluten.

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Thanks for all your replies :)

I do not think it can be cross-contamination since I have used all the equipment for other things since I last used them with gluten and have not become ill - I use the same pots and pans for everything and cook 3 meals a day with them, none of which have made me sick.

I also have not had any other gastro symptoms from dairy, just burping and pooping a little more often. I still get GERD symptoms from time-to-time, but they didn't really accompany the burping from the bread today. Belching is at least fairy minor - socially awkward but nothing that is going to cause too much pain!

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i'm putting my money on the flour blend. Have you used it before?

Also, vitamins and whatnot can occasionally contain gluten.

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Are you still experiencing gum infections and loss of bone density in my teeth, constant rashes and allergic reactions, sleeping 12+ hours a night, foggy mind, sores in the corner of my mouth, depression and anxiety, sciatic pains, dry skin, poor circulation, hair loss and weak nails? Or have these symptoms started to show improvement?

Something to consider if you have only improved in some area is eliminating Sodium Laure Sulfate (SLS) from your environment. It is in a lot of stuff and will overwork your immune system (check tooth paste, hand soap, shampoo, bubble bath, and even some prescriptions). This may help with dry skin, the sores in your mouth, increase the strength of your hair (maybe nails, not sure) and decrease the overall inflammation level of your body and help decrease fatigue.

Insofar as loss of bone density, if you are having trouble absorbing calcium then you may have damage to the upper part of your intestine, where celiac does the most damage. Supplementing calcium may be a good start as well as digestive enzymes to help your system break down any fat soluble vitamins you might not be absorbing as well (Vit D or magnesium shortages can also cause decreased bone density).

Hope this helps.

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It would be good to get the blood testing for celiac disease done before going gluten-free. The antibodies start dropping off after you go gluten-free and are harder or impossible to detect. The gluten-free diet is not an instant cure though, it can take months (or years) for the GI system to heal and symptoms to go away. In the beginning of the gluten-free diet it is not unusual to have somewhat random reactions to foods that may not be gluten reactions at all. Your digestive system is irritated and raw inside and things just don't work right in that condition. That doesn't mean you shouldn't be careful and try to eliminate all traces of gluten though. A whole foods diet with no processed foods is a good way to start the gluten-free diet.

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