• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Can You Have Ibs And Gluten Intolerance?
0

Rate this topic

8 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

My doc casually mentioned to me recently that even though I am clearly gluten intolerant, IBS can be very difficult to rule out as well. He says they sometimes co-exist.

(He's not a GI by the way, but so far he's always hit the nail on the head for me and all my weird diseases LOL).

If this is true, how would I know if my GI symptoms are from a glutening or from IBS?

I find this whole idea very depressing because at least I know I can try my best to avoid all gluten, but with IBS I wouldn't know what to do.

On top of that, I'm one of those people who doesn't really believe IBS even exists, that it's just a catch-all for doctors when they don't know what's going on.

Anyone have any experience with IBS in addition to celiac?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


I believe that if you still have "IBS" symptoms after being on the gluten free diet for a year, then there is something else going on that is causing the "IBS".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Irritable Bowel Syndrome= something is irritating your bowels.

Some people it is only gluten. Looks like for you it is gluten + something else.

Bowels aren't going to be inflamed and irritated without a cause. The tricky part is nailing down the cause(s).

When doctors give you and IBS diagnosis, it is there way of saying "we don't know what is making you sick. You may just have to deal with it."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will eventually be able to distinguish between the two because the symptoms will be different with a glutening.

This is how I figured out that millet (grain) bothered me, for example. My gluten symptoms include brain fog, headachey, joints flaring, gut puffing up a bit, and water retention/swelling in my ankles and feet. Millet was just causing food to run thru my system too fast. This also happened when I ate new foods that turned out to have a lot of oat cross contamination. The same thing happens with flax.

When cooking, just add one new ingredient at a time. Then you can tell what the culprit is, a lot easier. In the beginning, I ended up doing a fairly restricted diet, a modified SCD (nearly grainless, used almonds and just a little bit of rice a few times a month) that I did not even put yogurt into, because I had so much trouble finding yogurt that worked for me. I did not branch out much from whole foods such as meat, eggs, oil, fruit, vegetables, and nuts until my system could handle it, and I was pretty cautious. When we had a power outage that lasted nearly a week, I learned that I had to figure out how to adapt to eating some sort of easy to prepare packaged foods, or learn to live off of apples... that is when I started to trial things like peanut butter and cheeses. I've since learned that organic cheeses work better for me and I have to be very careful with what brands I use on other items.... I've reacted to the cross contamination in a brand of peanut butter marked "gluten free," but I am okay with another brand that is not marked like that, but is more honest with their labeling "processed in a facility that includes other tree nuts." I've also reacted to a LOT of supposedly gluten free snack crackers, so those things I treat as "minefields" of potentially messy ingredients, some of which I might never figure out. So it's plain brown rice cakes, dedicated facility, for me, if I want something like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Thanks everyone!!! I tend to agree, I feel like an IBS diagnosis is pretty useless.

I think I do have to give this time to see what the difference is between glutening and anything else that irritates my guts.

Takala, like you said, it seems that something is making stuff run thru me too fast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've recently started a very restricted diet and the from tips I read I eliminated almost everything . Now it's time to add one item every 3-4 days and see. Had brown rice pasta last night and keeping my fingers crossed. Hoping to keep my "run away train" on track.

Keep the advice and tips coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I've recently started a very restricted diet and the from tips I read I eliminated almost everything . Now it's time to add one item every 3-4 days and see. Had brown rice pasta last night and keeping my fingers crossed. Hoping to keep my "run away train" on track.

Keep the advice and tips coming.

Have you been feeling better on the restricted diet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,155
    • Total Posts
      939,960
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,139
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Morell
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I myself also have EOE and Celiac. Before my diagnoses I was getting bread and meat stuck in my esophogus. It wouldn’t pass. It got so bad when I ate a ribeye. It sat in the esophogus for 4 hours. Eventually I was able to vomit it up. It was followed by blood. I then went for a biopsy a month later and was diagnosed. I cut out most of the gluten out of my diet. But I also had to go see an allergy doctor and I have a soy and nut allergy. He explained that the restriction in the esophogus is a delayed reaction to either the soy, gluten, or nuts. So I try to avoid those foods as much as possible. I carry an epi pen with me when I go out to eat. 
    • My biopsy showed Villi damage in the small intestine. It was followed up with blood work. My GI was frustrated with me when I started questioning her. She couldn’t even explain the results to me. She just circled positive and left me hanging. Can anybody explain how my results look? Am I definitely positive? Endomysial Antibody Titer 1:80 titer transglutamine AB, IGA  >100 U/mL Immunoglobulin A  228 mg/dl      
    • My daughter was diagnosed with celiac in 2014.    She never had a problem with gluten, and she is still a silent celiac.  But she was formally diagnosed with blood test and biopsy.   So, having no "problems" with gluten does not necessarily mean you are not celiac. I too, did not want to accept that my daughter has celiac, and we did a DNA testing, and found that she does carry one of the celiac genes.   So, if you do not want to accept celiac (or just very curious), you can get a dna test to see if you have one of these genes.   I was told that people without one of those celiac genes can not have celiac.
    • Download the app "Find Me gluten-free". It was a life saver when I went on a road trip. You can scan the area you are in for all of the nearest safe restaurants. I only go to the ones labeled "Celiac Friendly" , but that's up to you. Make sure you read the reviews and look at the ratings.  Majority of popular restaurants are not safe. I have found some local restaurants that I enjoy, so ask around in your community. I usually feel safe eating at Chipolte, because I watch them prepare everything right in front of me. If you tell them you have a gluten allergy they will wash their hands, change their gloves, change out the spoons for all of the ingredients you want, and get new bins of cheese. Just make sure you watch the whole time.  I have also eaten at Five Guys several times. Their fries are usually fried in peanut oil and do not have any coating, so if they change their gloves they should be okay. I usually get a hamburger on a lettuce wrap instead of a bun and ask them to keep it separate as they make it. Just like with Chipolte, you can watch everything they do. I always stand right by the counter and watch them make my food to look out for possible cross contamination.  They usually are very careful, but you do have to be very aware and make a decision based on how conscious the workers seem. Mellow Mushrooms also seem to be in many states. All of the locations I have been to have had gluten free options and dedicated kitchen space.  These are some of the restaurants that work for me, but it is different for every person and every circumstance. The most important thing is to be safe. Always ask a lot of questions. I have decided not to eat at places before because of the way a waiter has answered a question about their procedures to reduce cross contamination.  I will also skip out on eating out if the place is busy. No matter how careful they say they will be a kitchen is a busy place. If the restaurant is packed it's better to be safe and not risk it.  I hope you find some places to eat out that work for you, but the truth is a lot of the time you will just need to bring your own food or eat at home. Your health is more important than eating out.  It gets easier and you will learn what is safe and what works. Good luck!
    • Oh, I missed the part about Canadian candy.  Maybe you can buy some American candy on line - then you would know it's safe. Can you buy American candy on Amazon?  I buy everything on Amazon! Can you call the Hershey's in Canada and ask them?  Pick your favorite candy or two and research it?  Just a thought....
  • Upcoming Events