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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Hunger Pains
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22 posts in this topic

Just a tiny TMI alert...

Today has been a weird day. Apparently, I was glutened by my tapioca (maybe it was the strainer I used, my sister cooked the not so gluten free rice pasta and used it) so yesterday I felt discomfort and unusual bloating. Today, a minor part of my stools was loose, had a foul smell and there were bits of food (ew :blink:). And I feel so hungry!

Since I was glutened, I decided to keep the diet very light. To breakfast, I had a tall glass of acerola juice, a scrambled egg and a banana. Two hours later, I felt cramping, and I started going nuts thinking what the hell did I eat to cause me cramping, then turns out it was hunger. Made a light tomato soup, ate a cup of it with passion fruit juice. Two hours later, cramping. It was hunger. Half of a cup of the soup, an apple. Two hours later, the same damn thing. Ate another banana, a glass of guava juice. And again. Another scrambled egg, another apple. Now it won't make even a couple of hours I ate this last meal and I'm hungry again, with cramping and all. Will make a glass of caj

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If that's all I ate, I'd be starving, too. I'd go for that nice juicy gluten-free hamburger!!! laugh.gif

Maybe I missed it in a previous post, but is there a reason you need or want to stay at or under 1,000 calories a day?

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I'd say phooie on the 1k calorie thing and go for it (if you don't have a medical reason to do so).

You could also eat more often with less meals. Thats what i generally do.

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I actually end on 1000 cals by chance. I eat normally and use a calorie counter app on my phone as a food log, and I put the exact quantities and everything. It always end up 1000 or less, and usually I have only three or four major meals... Today was an exception because I thought my tummy would be upset. It is not, gladly :P

I am definitely concerned because I have swimming and dance classes, and I am underweight already (92 pounds at 5'3) but I just didn't find the right foods yet. Right now, I tried to cut the salad of my plate at lunch to eat more meat, rice and beans but then I reached 1000. Before, I'd stay at 800 or 900 at best.

Maybe meat is the solution...

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I definitely think you need more protein and good fats. Your body is telling you something...you're starving!!!

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Exactly! Also, can you eat tree nuts? They're loaded in protien.

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I used to eat cashews, then I reacted to them as well (it wasn't CC, I tend to react to things when I eat them a lot and too frequently, learned the lesson <_< ) so I'm thinking of introducing some brazilian nuts and almonds now.

Will try to make a recipe of honey and lemon cupcakes without baking powder and with whole foods only to see if I get along well with them.

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I have to agree that you are definitely not eating enough. Honestly though, after I've had a glutening incident I find that for several days I have very severe stomach cramps. They are quite similar to the pain I'll get after not eating for days, and I've found only one thing helps. Constant snacking. The only relief I get is to keep something, anything, in my stomach. From sunup to sundown I will keep something I can munch on within arms reach and start stuffing my face the minute I feel the pain again. I don't personally have a lot of protein options so I like to do things like hard boiled eggs and fresh veggies with some dip. Or I'll even do cheese if you can do dairy. I probably only eat 1/4 to 1/3 of a cup of something at a time but it's enough to keep my stomach from gnawing on my spine.

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That's what I'm doing basically... I snack every couple of hours or so right now. Hmm... Carrots :lol:

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And you're eating a lot of low energy-density foods. The don't have many calories for their size and ability to fill you up. Which is great for some people, but not so great if you're needing the calories (and sustained energy) to keep your blood sugar up.

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Fruit juice is very high in natural sugar. It has as much sugar as soda. It might make you spike and then crash needing nourishment. I agree also that high protein and good fats would be helpful. Without coconut, olive oil, or butter, I am hungry again shortly thereafter.

Diana

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I find avocado or sweet potato keep me full well

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I definitely think you need more protein and good fats. Your body is telling you something...you're starving!!!

I agree.

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If you react to things after eating them a lot or too frequently it might be because you are salicylate sensitive. Salicylates build up in your system. Pistachios are a good example. I can eat ten or twelve at a sitting, and only once a week. Any more than that and I have a reaction. Most nuts are high in sals. Walnuts are generally safe though. How do you do with berries? They are all very high in sals. Do you have trouble with them? Check out salicylatesensitivity.com for more info.

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Yeah, all that juice is cranking your blood sugar all over the place. I don't even drink any kind of juice anymore, I just eat the fruit. With cheese. You really need more calorie dense foods, soup and apples and juice just aren't going to cut it.

Avocados, nuts, olive oil, potatoes, sweet potatoes, all winter squashes, MEAT. These things will help keep you full.

So yes, to answer your question, shut up and eat a hamburger.

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Yeah, all that juice is cranking your blood sugar all over the place. I don't even drink any kind of juice anymore, I just eat the fruit. With cheese. You really need more calorie dense foods, soup and apples and juice just aren't going to cut it.

Avocados, nuts, olive oil, potatoes, sweet potatoes, all winter squashes, MEAT. These things will help keep you full.

So yes, to answer your question, shut up and eat a hamburger.

and she says that with LOVE!!

and I second it....eat these healthy fats and a big old burger of you want!. I just baked an acorn squash rubbed with coconut oil and it's gonna be de-lish with beef filet.

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and she says that with LOVE!!

and I second it....eat these healthy fats and a big old burger of you want!. I just baked an acorn squash rubbed with coconut oil and it's gonna be de-lish with beef filet.

Heehee, I should put that as the quote at the bottom of all my posts- "She says with love"

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Heehee, I should put that as the quote at the bottom of all my posts- "She says with love"

that'll work ;)

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But my juice is just the blended fruit with water... :huh:

Bartfull, I don't think I'm salicylate sensitive. My father told me the other day I have a leaky gut since a child and it does cause random intolerances... Though I will sure pay attention to sals now, to see if it might have something to do with it.

And yes, everything noted down. Olive oil, nuts, meat. And eat more :P

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Using the whole fruit is a very good thing, but having just straight liquid fruit is still going to jerk your blood sugar all over the place. When not combined with fiber, fat, and protein, it's pretty much the equivalent of having a soda every time, when it comes to your blood sugar levels. Yes, there's lots of good nutrients in there, but they'd be outweighed by the damage you're doing with the blood sugar spikes and the resulting insulin flush. Insulin is pretty rough on the human body. So a smoothie with whole yogurt (if you can have dairy) and protein powder and some flax seed along with that fruit will do you much better. If dairy's a no-no you might try coconut milk. Very tasty in smoothies!

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Just read your signature line, totally ignore my silly-head dairy suggestions.....

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I will try that, for sure! Yeah, dairy does no good to me, but I already used coconut milk in recipes and felt just fine.

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