• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Good Greens Bars - Labeled gluten-free, But Not Really
0

6 posts in this topic

Just wanted to share something I learned to help others...

I used to be enamored with Good Greens bars. They were my go-to food for portability. I swear, on my honor, that they used to be certified.

A while back I noticed some constipation with them, but figured I just wasn't getting enough fiber. Then, I had a PB&J bar, and noticed it was disgustingly sweet. I asked my husband, "Do these taste different to you?" He said, "I dunno"

He just called me from the grocery store to say that the box has a "Produced in a facility with wheat" statement. I went to the kitchen, pulled up the box, and sure enough, there it was. Also, the "Gluten-Free" is no longer the black and white certified gluten-free circle, it's just a generic grain pic with "gluten free" under it.

Looking closely at the ingredients, it has "grain dextrins" -- not sure how I missed those before; they don't list the dextrose source -- and "certified gluten free oats" -- that explains some things, for me at least!!

I am going to write the company to see if their formulas and certification status has indeed changed, that way I'll know if it's them or if it's me. When I first ate them, I was newly gluten free, and as time goes by, I seem to be getting more and more able to detect trace amounts by my reactions.

Just want to encourage you to read your labels of your Good Greens bars if you eat them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


response from the company

Begin forwarded message:

From: Good Greens Info <info@goodgreensbars.com>

Date: October 11, 2012 4:14:01 AM EDT

Cc: Jim Clifford <jc@goodgreensbars.com>

Subject: Re: change in formula / gluten free certification?

First off - We would like to thank you for supporting Good Greens, and for asking these questions.

1) The allergen statement about wheat,soy ect IS NEW - it was a requirement made by liability insurance for the facility the produces our bars, since it's not exclusively a gluten free or NON GMO facility

2) The sweetness in the bars comes from (1) the natural ingredients in our Z-52 superfood powder (nine different dehyrdrated berries), (2) the nautral freeze-dried fruit in our bars, (3) Fruitrim which is concentrated fruit juices that we use for freshness and to hold all of the raw ingrendients in our bar together. Since it's a raw product, the taste of the product varies depending upon when we harvest the ingredients for our superfood powder, and generally later in season berries tend to taste sweeter once they have gone thru the dehyrdation proces.

3) Again the grain dextrins are from the Fruittrim, http://advancedingredients.com/fruitrim.php, and it's certified Gluten Free

4) The facility that made our bars was at one time certified by GIG as being Gluten Free, and recently we were informed by GIG that they they were no longer certified, and therefore neither was our product. As a result we have had to remove the GIG certification and get certified by an independent 3rd party, which we are now doing. This 3rd party works with our manufacturing facility's Quality Assurance Team to ensure that the proper protocol is met each time we manufacture our product, and then subsquentially randomly tests our product to ensure that the gluten content in our bars is less than 20 ppm which is the FDA standard.

5) The oats we use are from Cream Hill Estates and are certified Gluten Free by GIG -The oats is what give our bar it's 5 grams of fiber, and also allows for bar to be low glyscemic (diabetic safe), no plans for changing in the futue - I understand your concern but this might help

http://www.creamhillestates.com/en_oats_celiac_disease.php

On Wed, Oct 10, 2012 at 4:55 PM, wrote:

Hi - I've been a Good Greens customer for a while; at least one year. I have noticed some changes, and am wondering if you can verity these for me?

1) I noticed the allergen statement about wheat, soy, etc. Has that always been on your packages? Is that fairly new?

2) I noticed that your bars seem to be much sweeter than before. Has the recipe changed? Have your suppliers changed formulas?

3) Can you tell me the grains included in the "grain dextrins" of the fruit sweetener?

4) I thought I recalled your products as having the "Certified Gluten Free" black and white circle logo on them. Do I remember this correctly? Has your certification status changed? I was surprised to look at a newer box and see that it is a wheat logo with gluten free under it, not the circle certification logo. Can you verify? Have you ever been certified? Will you ever be ?

5) Will you ever make a bar that is without oats? Some celiacs cannot tolerate even gluten free oats. Avenin can trigger an immune response like gluten. Have you considered other protein-rich things like chia?

Thanks for any info.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for checking on there bars and posting their reply HotinC, I'd have problems with them too since they have oats. I used to do oats every day but after a while on gluten-free they started to cause symptoms. So no more oats for me. Lara bars are a good choice to sub.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am the executive director of the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG), which runs the Gluten Free Certification Program (GFCO).

I just want to set the record straight regarding whether GOOD GREENS bars have ever been certified gluten free by GIG. In its 11 October 2012 post, Good Greens states that its GOOD GREENS bars had been, but no longer are, certified gluten free by GIG. In fact, GOOD GREEN bars have never been certified gluten free by GFCO, therefore their use of the GFCO logo is in violation of Trademark license registration.

Good Greens’ statement to the contrary is false.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, hello, GIG person above ^ !

re: 3) the "grain dextrins" - Noticed the link to the "Fruitrim" ingredient, STILL does not specify what the grain product it is that they call a dextrin, and mix with the fruit juice to create this ingredient, other than they claim it is NOT corn. Bad sign. If it is not corn, and it is a grain, that leaves the other categories of either wheat/barley or rice for the most common and cheapest grain sources. If it were rice, they'd probably be happy to put it on the label... just sayin' :mellow::blink:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I am the executive director of the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG), which runs the Gluten Free Certification Program (GFCO).

I just want to set the record straight regarding whether GOOD GREENS bars have ever been certified gluten free by GIG. In its 11 October 2012 post, Good Greens states that its GOOD GREENS bars had been, but no longer are, certified gluten free by GIG. In fact, GOOD GREEN bars have never been certified gluten free by GFCO, therefore their use of the GFCO logo is in violation of Trademark license registration.

Good Greens’ statement to the contrary is false.

Wow, thanks for letting us know! I never tried them myself, but I sure won't be trying them now!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,339
    • Total Posts
      935,565
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,999
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Con Smith
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • It seems like you really need a concrete or near concrete answer so I would say maybe you ought to get the gene testing. Then you can decide on the gluten challenge.   Thanks! I am convinced our dogs are there waiting for us. Meanwhile they are playing, running, laughing, barking & chasing. I have another favorite quote dealing with dogs: "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home & examine your conscience."  ~~~ Woodrow Wilson ~~~
    • I can't help thinking that all of this would be so much easier if the doctor I went to 10 years ago would have done testing for celiac, rather than tell me I probably should avoid gluten. He was looking to sell allergy shots and hormone treatment, he had nothing to gain from me being diagnosed celiac. I've been messing around ever since, sort-of-most-of the time being gluten free but never being strict about it. I really feel like three months of eating gluten would do my body a lot of permanent damage. I've got elevated liver enzymes for the third time since 2008 and no cause can be found which might be good, I guess. I wonder if it would be reasonable to do the HLA testing first, to decide if I really need to do the gluten challenge. If the biopsy is negative, that is. Squirmingitch, love your tag line about dogs in heaven. We lost the best dog ever last December. I sure hope all my dogs are there waiting for me!
    • Most (90%-95%) patients with celiac disease have 1 or 2 copies of HLA-DQ2 haplotype (see below), while the remainder have HLA-DQ8 haplotype. Rare exceptions to these associations have been occasionally seen. In 1 study of celiac disease, only 0.7% of patients with celiac disease lacked the HLA alleles mentioned above. Results are reported as permissive, nonpermissive, or equivocal gene pairs. From: http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/88906  
    • This is not quite as cut & dried as it sounds. Although rare, there are diagnosed celiacs who do not have either of those genes. Ravenwoodglass, who posted above, is one of those people. I think she has double DQ9 genes? Am I right Raven?  My point is, that getting the gene testing is not an absolute determination either way.
    • Why yes it is! jmg and myself are NCIS, I mean NCGS specialist/experts or is it NCGI people ourselves. posterboy,
  • Upcoming Events