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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
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Soy?
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9 posts in this topic

Hi, I have been diagnosed with Celiac disease 4 weeks ago. I thought I was getting a handle on the dietary needs by reading all the info I can find and meeting with a dietician. Today at my Dr. appointment he said I also had to be aware of cross contamination with Soy. I guess I'm back to the deer in the headlights feeling. I'm wondering if I could get some advice on where to start sorting this out? Thanks for any advice.

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Generally, some celiacs are fine with soy; others are not. Its the same with dairy and nightshades; some people can handle them and others not.

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He may have meant that most soy sauce contains gluten (wheat). It is clearly listed on the label.

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Soy beans can be grown in the same fields (not at the same time, obviously). So it's not an outrageous concern.

But, I would suggest that you concentrate on removing all gluten from your diet for an extended time period. If....after you're satisfied that you have been "clean" from all gluten (as much as possible), then explore other potential intolerance's.

One step at a time! ;)

And welcome!

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Good advice. I'm learning each time I log in I feel better every day without gluten in my diet. Thanks for the welcome.

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I am also a new celiac and was warned of soy which I have found to be troublesome. Also tapioca which is disappointing since so many products that are gluten-free contain either soy or tapioca flours. Learning to cook decent means has been a challenge and I do miss bread terribly. Pizza was a fond memory until Dominoes gluten free which I actually find quite tolerable. I have a supportive boyfriend, however, and friends have finally stopped offering cakes, pies and cookies. I am new to researching it and looking forward to learning more. Thank you all for being here.

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I am also a new celiac and was warned of soy which I have found to be troublesome. Also tapioca which is disappointing since so many products that are gluten-free contain either soy or tapioca flours. Learning to cook decent means has been a challenge and I do miss bread terribly. Pizza was a fond memory until Dominoes gluten free which I actually find quite tolerable. I have a supportive boyfriend, however, and friends have finally stopped offering cakes, pies and cookies. I am new to researching it and looking forward to learning more. Thank you all for being here.

Are you saying that you think tapioca has gluten or that you cannot tolerate it? Tapioca flour/starch is a gluten-free product, which a lot of us use in baking. You might want to check these lists of safe and unsafe ingredients and also the Newbie 101 topic.

Edit: If for some reason you cannot tolerate tapioca, there are other starches that can be substituted in baking (potato starch, cornstarch, etc.)

Edited by sa1937
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Some of the dangers you will find will be in products like soy sauce, teriyaki, worchestershire, chicken and beef broth and other additive products. Archer Daniels Midland is a giant company that makes tons of food additives (citric acid, xantham gum, etc) and you'll need to learn which of those products are derived from wheat, barley or rye. Plus watch for things like "natural flavoring" as well. Sometimes those are safe, sometimes not. Your body will let you know, but that's the worst way to find a food contains gluten. I have an app on my phone just for gluten containing ingredients...basically lists whether they are safe or not. Works great in a crunch when I can't recall from the hundreds of ingredients whether something is safe.

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Probably your doctor meant soy sauce, which usually includes wheat.

However, some celiacs (me included) end up with an intolerance to soy (including me). However, since you have just started eating gluten-free and are still healing, as another poster said, give youself a few months to heal before worrying about other food intolerances. If you're getting symptoms after that, then you can look at soy (dairy/casein is another common problem) as a culprit.

In the meantime, just be very careful when reading labels. There are great gluten-free soy sauces out there, and you can make your own teriaki, etc, or carry some with you to sushi restaurants and such.

Happy healing

Peg

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